Oh, chute!

Two telemetered pallid sturgeon were located in Lisbon Chute the week of April 18th. Lisbon Chute is a side channel to the Missouri River between Glasgow and Arrow Rock, Missouri, on the Big Muddy National Wildlife Refuge.  It formed during intense floods that occurred between 1993 and 1996. The chute currently has a rock inlet structure which controls the amount of water that flows into it from the main channel of the Missouri River. The discharges and geomorphology of the chute combine to provide a diverse range of depths and velocities for fish habitats and other aquatic biota.

Lisbon Chute is a side channel to the Missouri River between Glasgow and Arrow Rock, MO, on the Big Muddy National Wildlife Refuge. It currently has a rock inlet structure (pictured) which controls the amount of water that flows into it from the main channel of the Missouri River. Telemetered pallid sturgeon have been located downstream of this structure.

This is not the first time telemetered pallid sturgeon have been located in Lisbon Chute. In 2008, a reproductive female (PLS08-008) was located twice inside the chute as she migrated upstream. In 2010, a reproductive male (PLS09-013) was followed as he entered the chute and swam up to the inlet structure.  Last week, another male (PLS10-028) whose reproductive condition is unknown was found at the inlet structure at the top of the chute.  He was located there over a 4 hour period on one day and then found downstream of the chute the next day.

The other sturgeon located in the chute in 2011 is a reproductive male (PLS11-003).  New to the telemetry study this spring, PLS11-003 was caught on a trotline and implanted nearly 40 miles downstream of Lisbon Chute at the end of March.  That’s a 40 mile upstream swim in one month!

Lisbon Chute Use Map 2011

Telemetered pallid sturgeon locations in the Lisbon Chute side channel of the Missouri River, 2008-2011.

About Emily Pherigo

Emily is no longer with the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project. When she was here, she was a biologist contracted to the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project. Most of her time was spent at a computer performing QA/QC on data or updating figures and graphs most used by Aaron DeLonay. However, she occasionally made it to the river, where she enjoyed seeing pallid sturgeon and was reminded why she entered the natural resources field.
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