Author Archives: Casey Hickcox

Habitat surveys of 2015 pallid sturgeon spawning patches on the Yellowstone River

By Carrie Elliott, Robb Jacobson, and Casey Hickcox During the last two weeks of June, USGS habitat crews surveyed the pallid sturgeon spawning reach of the Lower Yellowstone River near Fairview, North Dakota.  Using a compact multibeam sonar echosounder system … Continue reading

Posted in Habitat mapping, Methods, Pallid sturgeon, Reproductive Female, Spawning, Telemetry tracking, Upper Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers | Tagged , , |

Characterizing Spawning Habitat Substrate on the Lower Yellowstone River

By Eric Allen, Ed Bulliner, Carrie Elliott, Robert Jacobson Many sturgeon species spawn over coarse, hard substrate, and Missouri River scientists have thought that this was probably the case for the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus).  Characterizing the size, type, … Continue reading

Posted in Habitat mapping, Spawning, Upper Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers | Tagged , , |

New shallow water surveying technology deployment at CERC

By Carrie Elliott, Robb Jacobson, Eric Allen, and Casey Hickcox This spring, experiments to observe shovelnose sturgeon spawning behavior have been ongoing in ponds at the Columbia Environmental Research Center. To characterize the depths and velocities in the experimental ponds, … Continue reading

Posted in Habitat mapping, Technology | Tagged , , |

Stream studies back in action

By Aaron DeLonay, Robert Jacobson, Kim Chojnacki, and Casey Hickcox Final preparations are underway to initiate lake sturgeon laboratory and artificial stream studies at the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC).  One 46.5 lb. female and three males have been selected … Continue reading

Posted in Early life history, Spawning, Sturgeon culture and propagation | Tagged , |

Spreading the word on pallid sturgeon research

By Robert Jacobson, Kim Chojnacki, and Casey Hickcox Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) scientists took to the road in March to share some of the center’s work over the last year with the Missouri River Natural Resource Conference (MRNRC) in … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Habitat mapping, Technology |

The Sounds of Sturgeon Research

By Aaron DeLonay, Kimberly Chojnacki, and Casey Hickcox Recently, Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project scientists documented a spawning event in the Yellowstone River when researchers followed a reproductive female sturgeon to a location where an aggregation of male sturgeon had been identified (See … Continue reading

Posted in Spawning, Technology, Telemetry tracking, Upper Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers | Tagged , , |

A Spawning Recorded in the Yellowstone River

By Patrick Braaten She was initially captured in September 1993, but at the time, the sex and reproductive status of the 1325 mm, 15.9 kg pallid sturgeon were not determined. She was implanted with a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag … Continue reading

Posted in Recapture, Reproductive Female, Spawning, Telemetry tracking, Upper Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers | Tagged , , |

Mapping the Chutes

By Robert Jacobson and Casey Hickcox The presence of pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) on the Federal Endangered Species List generally boils down to their inability to reproduce in the wild. Scientists suspect shallow-water habitat lost when the Missouri River was … Continue reading

Posted in chute, Habitat mapping, Technology | Tagged , , , |

It’s more than just gravel and sand!

By Aaron Delonay, Robert Jacobson, and Casey Hickcox Scientists hypothesize that pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus), like other sturgeon species, spawn over hard or coarse substrate such as bedrock, cobble or gravel. The type, size, or composition of coarse substrate that … Continue reading

Posted in Habitat mapping, Spawning | Tagged , , , |

Unpredictable Water in the Missouri River

By Aaron Delonay, Robert Jacobson, and Casey Hickcox As the temperatures in the Missouri River Basin begin to rise each spring, snowmelt and spring storms typically introduce large quantities of water into the system. This water becomes runoff that enters … Continue reading

Posted in Drought, Flooding, Spawning | Tagged , , , |