BETA.USGS.GOV COUNTDOWN
Check it out and give us feedback.
View Site
USGS - science for a changing world

Climate and Land Use Change Research and Development Program

Climate and Land Use Change Home
Additional Information
Select Bibliography:

Hodgkins, G.A., 2009. Streamflow changes in Alaska between the cool phase (1947-1976) and the warm phase (1977-2006) of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation - The influence of glaciers: Water Resources Research.

Hodgkins, G.A., and Dudley, R.W., 2006. Changes in the timing of winter-spring streamflows in eastern North America, 1913-2002: Geophysical Research Letters.

Climate and Land Use Impacts on Streamflows

Streamflows in undeveloped watersheds are influenced by climatic changes while highly developed ones are also influenced by changes such as urbanization
Streamflows in undeveloped watersheds are
influenced by climatic changes while highly
developed ones are also influenced by
changes such as urbanization
This project will improve understanding of historical hydrologic extremes in the United States through analysis of historical trends and relations with climatic variables (such as temperature and precipitation) and variables indicative of direct human influence on extreme streamflows (such as urbanization and streamflow reservoir regulation). The current focus of the project is to put extreme high streamflow trends in the United States into a better temporal and spatial context by examining historical climate-related changes in the frequency of major floods in North America and Europe. Following this, the project will concentrate on quantifying climatic and direct human influences on both high and low extreme streamflow trends in the United States.

Why is this research important?

It is critical to better understand how both climatic changes and direct human influence such as land-use change affect the magnitude of extreme flow trends. Extreme high flows can be very damaging to river and floodplain infrastructure. Extreme low flows can be detrimental to human water use and aquatic habitat. Based on previous work it is clear that both climatic and direct human factors are important to extreme flows, however, there has been very little quantitative analysis of how these joint influences affect trends over time at the regional or national level in the United States.

Principal Investigator: Glenn Hodgkins, Maine Water Science Center

Project Team: Robert Dudley

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/climate_landuse/clu_rd/projects/cc_streamflows.asp
Page Contact Information: Website Manager
Page Last Modified: Thursday, January 24, 2013