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Niño de Guzmán, G.T., Hapeman, C.J., Prabhakara, K., Codling, E.E., Shelton, D.R., Rice, C.P., Hively, W.D., McCarty, G.W., Lang, M.W., Torrents, A., 2012 (May), Potential Pollutant Sources in a Choptank River (USA) Subwatershed and the Influence of Land Use and Watershed Characteristics: Science of the Total Environment, v.430, p. 270-279.

Hunt, E.R. Jr., Hively, W.D., McCarty, G.W., Daughtry, C.S.T., Forrestal, P.J., Kratochvil R.J., Carr, J.L., Allen, N.F., Fox-Rabinovitz, J.R., and Miller, C.D., 2011, NIR-green-blue high-resolution digital images for assessment of winter cover crop biomass: GIScience & Remote Sensing, v. 48, no. 1, p. 86-98.

Hively, W.D., McCarty, G.M., Reeves III, J.B., Lang, M.W., Oesterling, R.A., Delwiche, S.R., 2011, Use of Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery to Map Soil Properties in Tilled Agricultural Fields: Applied and Environmental Soil Science, v. 2011, no. 358193, 13 p.

Understanding Agricultural Conservation Practices

Advances in available information and data management allow us to analyze farmland management on a field-by-field basis, integrating high resolution maps of crop type and cover crop performance with privacy-protected knowledge of farm conservation practice implementation records.
Advances in available information and data management allow us to analyze
farmland management on a field-by-field basis, integrating high resolution
maps of crop type and cover crop performance with privacy-protected knowledge
of farm conservation practice implementation records.
The effective implementation of agricultural conservation practices is critical to the improvement of water quality in the Chesapeake Bay region, where non-point sources of nutrients, sediment, and agrichemicals are significant contributors to water quality impairment. The use of winter cover crops, for example, has been identified as a key conservation management practice for reducing the loss of nitrogen and sediment from agricultural lands. However, the effectiveness of conservation practices varies widely depending on landscape, climate, and agronomic management. How successful are cover crops at protecting water quality, when implemented across the landscape on a wide variety of farms? This question can be answered by combining satellite remote sensing of wintertime vegetation with site-specific knowledge of agricultural management practices. This allows a field-by-field evaluation and mapping of winter cover crop performance and associated nutrient and soil conservation benefits. The results can be reported to farmers, Soil Conservation Districts, and State and Federal conservation programs, providing valuable information to support adaptive management strategies that target and promote the most successful conservation practices. This allows a field-by-field evaluation and mapping of winter cover crop performance and associated nutrient and soil conservation benefits. The results can be reported to farmers, Soil Conservation Districts, and State and Federal conservation programs, providing valuable information to support adaptive management strategies that target and promote the most successful conservation practices.

Principal Investigator: Dean Hively, dhively@usgs.gov, Eastern Geographic Science Center, Reston, VA

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