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Chen, X., Liu, S., Zhu, Z., Vogelmann, J.E., Li, Z., and Ohlen, D.O., 2011, Estimating aboveground forest biomass carbon and fire consumption in the U.S. Utah High Plateaus using data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program, Landsat, and LANDFIRE: Ecological Indicators, v. 11, no. 1, p. 140-148.

Dietze, M.C., Vargas, R., Richardson, A.D., Stoy, P.C., Barr, A.G., Anderson, R.S., Arain, M.A., Baker, I.T., Black, T.A., Chen, J.M., Ciais, P., Flanagan, L.B., Gough, C.M., Grant, R.F., Hollinger, D., Izaurralde, R.C., Kucharik, C.J., Lafleur, P., Liu, S., Lokupitiya, E., Luo, Y., Munger, J.W., Peng, C., Poulter, B., Price, D.T., Ricciuto, D.M., Riley, W.J., Sahoo, A.K., Schaefer, K., Suyker, A.E., Tian, H., Tonitto, C., Verbeeck, H., Verma, S.B., Wang, W., and Weng, E., 2011, Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales—a spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis: Journal of Geophysical Research G—Biogeosciences, v. 116, no. G4, p. G04029.

Euliss Jr., N.H., Smith, L.M., Liu, S., Duffy, W.G., Faulkner, S.P., Gleason, R.A., and Eckles, S.D., 2011, Integrating estimates of ecosystem services from conservation programs into data-assimilation models for decision makers—the vision for CEAP—wetlands: Ecological Applications, v. 21, no. 3, Suppl. S, p. S128-S134.

Carbon Dynamics on DOI Lands

Ecosystems such as this forest have complex evolutionary and land use histories and disturbance regimes. Models are being developed to quantify the provision of multiple ecosystem services, including carbon sequestration, across these diverse landscapes.  Photo: Devendra Dahal
Ecosystems such as this forest have complex evolutionary and land
use histories and disturbance regimes. Models are being developed
to quantify the provision of multiple ecosystem services, including
carbon sequestration, across these diverse landscapes.
Photo: Devendra Dahal
One of the ecosystem services provided by the land managed by the Department of the Interior (DOI) is carbon sequestration. There is virtually no systematic research on carbon status and trends on the vast areas of DOI land, and this is a critical deficiency in our national understanding. We use geographic information systems, remote sensing, and biogeochemical modeling techniques to quantify the status and trends of carbon stocks in vegetation and soils and to assess the impacts of land management actions, disturbances, and climate change on the carbon cycle on DOI land. It will provide critical information to support the management of the DOI lands. This project fills a knowledge gap and therefore contributes significantly to the understanding of the carbon cycle of the entire country, the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan, and the North American Carbon Program (NACP).

There is a strong need to develop modeling systems and tools to simultaneously quantify the impacts of land use and climate change on diverse ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, for decision makers. In order to address this need, we are developing an ecosystem services model (EcoServ). EcoServ development is a community effort, and the modeling system is staged on the Internet using open-source data and model sharing technology to accommodate a variety of algorithm developers, data providers, and users. It also relies heavily on existing disciplinary models, web services and visualization technologies, and datasets from the ground and satellites.

Principal Investigator: Shuguang (Leo) Liu, sliu@usgs.gov, EROS Center, Sioux Falls, SD

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