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Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries - State Wildlife Action Plans (SWAP)

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A national look at Species of Greatest Conservation Need as reported in State Wildlife Action Plans

State Wildlife Action Plans are plans developed by a state for conserving wildlife and habitat before they become too rare or costly to restore. In 2005, all 50 States and five U.S. territories developed a State Wildlife Action Plan (http://www.teaming.com/state-wildlife-action-plans-swaps). Each plan includes the identification of Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) for that state.

One approach to advance the national conservation agenda is to use common terminology to identify and communicate common needs that extend across political boundaries. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a process that allows the Species of Greatest Conservation Need from all of the state's plans to be compiled, making their representation across taxa groups and nationwide available via the Species Conservation Analysis Tool. Before a compiled view could be accomplished, consistent naming of species amongst the states' plans had to be achieved. Conforming species names to a single naming authority--the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (see www.itis.gov), an internationally recognized source for naming species, compiling a national list of Species of Greatest Conservation Need is now possible.

Revisions of State Wildlife Action Plans are currently underway and will be completed by 2015. USGS is coordinating with the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and individual state agencies to provide access to compiled species lists from the revised plans. The Species Conservation Analysis Tool will be updated with the new data to enable up-to-date information to inform decisions effecting conservation.

Please direct questions regarding this effort to or .

Important Message:

Revisions of each States' Wildlife Action Plan will be occurring throughout the year. Complementary changes to the Species Conservation Analysis Tool are underway to accommodate the revisions. As you explore the various views of the tool, be aware that there will discrepancies among and between the earlier, revised, and newer lists of the Species of Greatest Conservation Need during this period of transition. Thank you for understanding, and be sure to visit again soon to see the progress.

What's New: Web Services

Species by National List 
Species by State or U.S. Territory
Map of U.S. and Other Territories
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