Invasive Species General - 6 of 6

Invasive Species General FAQs - 6 Found

Load first FAQ in this category.

PREV

NEXT

Load last FAQ in this category.
What is an invasive species and why are they a problem?

An invasive species is an introduced, nonnative organism (disease, parasite, plant, or animal) that begins to spread or expand its range from the site of its original introduction and that has the potential to cause harm to the environment, the economy, or to human health.


A few well-known examples include the unintentional introduction of the West Nile virus, chestnut blight, the South American fire ant, zebra mussels, Burmese pythons, and sea lamprey. These are in addition to the intentional introductions of salt cedar (Tamarisk), kudzu vine, house sparrows, starlings, and nutria.


More than 6,500 of these harmful, non-native species cause more than 100 billion dollars in damage each year to the U.S. economy. Costly effects include crop decimation, clogging of water facilities and waterways, wildlife and human disease transmission, threats to fisheries, increased fire vulnerability, and adverse effects for ranchers and farmers.


Learn more: USGS Invasive Species Program

Tags: Biology, Ecosystems, Invasive Species