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Landslides FAQs - 22 Found

What should I know about wildfires and debris flows?

Wild land fires are inevitable in the western United States. Expansion of human development into forested areas has created a situation where wildfires can adversely affect lives and property, as can the flooding and landslides that occur in the aftermath of the fires. There is a need to develop tools and methods to identify and quantify the potential hazards posed by landslides produced from burned watersheds. Post-fire landslide hazards include fast-moving, highly destructive debris flows that can occur in the years immediately after wildfires in response to high intensity rainfall events, and those flows that are generated over longer time periods accompanied by root decay and loss of soil strength. Post-fire debris flows are particularly hazardous because they can occur with little warning, can exert great impulsive loads on objects in their paths, and can strip vegetation, block drainage ways, damage structures, and endanger human life. Wildfires could potentially result in the destabilization of pre-existing deep-seated landslides over long time periods.

 

Learn more:

 

Post-Wildfire Landslide Hazards

 

If you live in a recently burned area and there is a rainstorm...

 

Methods for the Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the Fires of 2007, Southern California.

 

Landslide Hazards Overview (in Spanish and English)

“Landslide Hazards” (English)

“Peligros de Deslizamientos” (Spanish)

Tags: Landslides, Liquefaction, Maps, Precipitation, Soils