Pollinators

Bats are among the world's least appreciated and most endangered animals.
No. Bats have small eyes that are functional and sensitive to light. Several bats, such as Rafinesque's and Townsend's big-eared bats, have greatly enlarged ears to help in echolocation, but bats also use sight to perceive their environment.
All healthy bats try to avoid humans by taking flight and are not purposely aggressive. Most bats are about the size of a mouse and use their small teeth and weak jaws to grind up insects.
Yes. There are at least 40 different kinds of bats in the U.S.
Yes. Bats either hibernate in winter or migrate to warmer areas. Those that hibernate build up a fat reserve to sustain them through the winter. If they are disturbed, their fat reserve could become exhausted and they could die prior to spring.
Less than one percent of the population contracts the disease, a lower rate of incidence than other mammals such as skunks. Still, you should not handle or disturb bats, especially those that are active and appear sick during daylight hours.