USGS FAQ Spotlights

Sinkhole in Daisetta, Texas

Getting a sinking feeling?

Sinkholes are created when underground rocks are eroded or dissolved by groundwater. Certain rocks are more susceptible than others to this kind of dissolution, and we have a pretty good idea of where they are. Here is a map showing areas of karst, areas susceptible to sinkholes, in the U.S.

Learn More:

The Science of Sinkholes

Water Science for Schools: Sinkholes

Factsheet: Sinkholes

Geologists extract a hand-driven core on Sitkinak Island, Alaska.

Could a tsunami hit US beaches?

Yes. According to tsunami deposit records left in Hawaii, Alaska, and the U.S. West Coast. U.S. beaches are vulnerable to tsunamis generated all around the Pacific Rim - anywhere there is a subduction zone or unstable shelf - which includes all of the U.S. West Coast and Hawaii. Tsunamis have been less frequent on the U.S. East coast and the Gulf coast.

Learn more:

Could a large tsunami happen in the United States?

Information about the latest earthquakes

Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

West Coast & Alaska Tsunami Warning Center

New York City

But, can I see my house?

That depends upon the remote-sensing platform (i.e., satellite, aircraft).  However, you may be able to identify your town. The surface of the Earth is changing rapidly, at local, regional, national, even global scales, with significant repercussions for people, the economy, and the environment. Remote sensing satellites and aircraft monitor the Earth providing information that is broad, precise, impartial, and easily available. 

Learn More:
Land Remote Sensing Image Collections
Land Remote Sensing Program
EarthExplorer
Global Visualization Viewer

 

 

 

 

Head of landslide; Seattle, Washington-1997

Will a landslide bring you down?

Hopefully not! However, landslides occur in all U.S. states and territories, and cause $1-2 billion in damages and more than 25 fatalities on average each year. Falling rocks, flows, and slides are among the most common and sometimes deadly hazards, yet there is still much to learn about how and why they happen.

Learn More:

USGS Landslide Hazards Program
Report a Landslide
Landslides 101
Landside Types and Processes

Satellite image of VOG produced by Kilauea being blown to southwest

January is Hawaii's Volcano Awareness Month. Where can I learn about VOG and other volcanic hazards?

On the Big Island of Hawaii, Kilauea has been continuously erupting since January 1983! Besides the hazard posed by flowing lava, residents and visitors alike need to be aware of the hazard posed by volcanic smog (VOG).
 

 

Photo of native elemental gold

Precious! What's in your Olympic medal?

There's gold (and silver and copper and tin) in those hills! The gold, silver, and bronze Olympic medals contain valuable minerals that are actively sought all over the world. The USGS has information about all of those and many other minerals of great value to society.

 

Mineral map from USGS website http://speclab.cr.usgs.gov/map.intro.html

Why are minerals so vital in modern society?

Global demand for critical mineral commodities, including rare-earth elements, is on the rise with increasing applications in consumer products, computers, alternative energy systems, and other advanced technology products.  (Learn more about this image.)

Copper River Delta, Alaska, May 28, 2013

Explore Land Imaging!

The USGS has provided continuous, objective imaging of Earth's surface since 1972 via Landsat satellites. The resulting land imaging archive is priceless not only as a record of change over time, but also in allowing us to understand large scale ecosystems and processes, and view the beauty and fragility of our planet.

 

FAQ: What is Landsat and when did it begin?

See America -- In person and in maps!

As you see America in person -- or instead of traveling -- check out USGS topographic maps. The USGS has been mapping since the 1880s. Now you can get almost any map we've ever made free online; a printed map is $15.

 

From your home town to America's favorite destinations, topo maps can take you higher, back in time, and far from where the car can go.

 

Historical topo FAQs

US Topo FAQs

 

Learn more about historical topographic maps and US Topo products.

US map showing drought areas, July 2013

Droughts, floods, glacial melting... Is this all "climate change" at work?

Cyclical weather patterns may cause periods of drought and floods. However, a drought or even a destructive hurricane season do not determine climate. Changes to climate are detected over much longer periods and larger areas. 
 
Test what you know about climate change using USGS FAQs:
 

This Web site has a new look!!

A few things have changed, but the content is the same trusted USGS answers you have always found here.

 

So what's new?

-->We have a new mobile-friendly version of the site. (20% of you are seeing this on mobile right now!)

-->FAQs in a category can now be presented in a more logical order. (We'll be doing more with this!)

-->Each Spotlight now includes an eye-catching image.

 

We hope you find what you need and enjoy your visit here!

Map of Bakken Formation boundary

What's the latest and greatest on undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Bakken Formation?

 

In April 2013, the USGS released a new assessment of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Bakken Formation, which shows twice the amount of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas as our earlier assessment. Learn more from our updated Bakken FAQs and the Energy Resources Program Web site.

View of Alaska pipeline

How is the USGS involved in assessing the Nation's energy resources?

 

The USGS conducts energy resource assessments on "traditional resources" (gas, oil, coal) - but also on alternative energy resources such as geothermal and methane hydrates.  The following links provide more information:

Oil & Gas Assessments

Coal Assessments

Gas hydrate (methane clathrate) FAQs

Other energy

Photo of erupting volcano

It's Volcano Awareness Month for Hawai'i. Where can I obtain more information on Hawaiian volcanoes?

 

January 2013 marks the 30th anniversary of Kīlauea's East Rift Zone eruption, which continues today. Two-hundred fourteen structures have been destroyed by lava since the eruption began. Check the following USGS links for FAQs and other information:

Hawai'i volcanoes

Lava flow Hazard Zone Maps

Volcanic ash and gases

Hawai'i Volcano Observatory

Diagram showing magnetic polarity of mid-ocean ridge rock

Why does the USGS study Earth's magnetic fields and paleomagnetism?

 

Learn about geomagnetic storms, magnetic reversals, and other interesting phenomena:

Geomagnetism FAQs

USGS Geomagnetism Program

Photo of mosquito biting human hand

How is animal and human health interrelated?

 

Some of the intricate ways human, animal, and ecosystem health are interconnected can be seen in the following USGS resources:

Animal-borne disease FAQs

Alaska Interagency Ecosystem Health Work Group

National Wildlife Health Center features and topics/

Environmental Health Science "GeoHealth Newsletter"

Diagram showing water table

Where can I learn more about groundwater?

 

The USGS monitors groundwater and has many kinds of information available. Learn more:

Where can I find information on water table depth?

Ground Water Atlas of the United States

The USGS Water Science School  (all ages)

Types of Landslides

Landslides? Could landslides affect me?

Yes they could. Learn about landslides in this video (http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/542), and find out more about what the USGS is doing about landslides in our Landslide FAQs.

Earthquake Image

Has earthquake activity been increasing?

It's easy to find out by checking one of our excellent Earthquake FAQs.

Earth's Magnetic Field

What does the USGS Geomagnetism Program do?

The mission of the Geomagnetism Program is to monitor the Earth’s magnetic field. Using ground-based observatories, the Program provides continuous records of magnetic field variations covering long timescales; disseminates magnetic data to various governmental, academic, and private institutions; and conducts research into the nature of geomagnetic variations for purposes of scientific understanding and hazard mitigation.

See Fact Sheet 2007-3092 for more information on "Monitoring the Earth's Dynamic Magnetic Field".


More information: Click Here.

Schematic diagram of radon gas pathways in a home

What is "uranium decay" and why is this something I might be interested in?

 

You've heard of radioactivity. Uranium decay is another way of referring to radioactivity. Uranium decay is important for many reasons, including its use as a tool to measure large spans of geologic time. In addition, radon, a dangerous gas that can accumulate in confined areas in buildings, is one of the products of uranium decay.

Learn more about uranium decay at one of our newest FAQs!

http://www.usgs.gov/faq/index.php?action=artikel&cat=104&id=1189&artlang=en&highlight=uranium+decay&search=true

Photo of a Burmese Python-record setting length, 17ft. 7in.

Green: Not just for St. Patrick's Day!

Ecosystems is the USGS theme for March, and what better way to be green on March 17th - or any other day this month - than to scroll down to Florida Ecosystems on our Invasive Species FAQs page.  Further scrolling reveals that we could use a modern St. Patrick to drive out invasive snakes in the Everglades!

USGS Ecosystems science

South Florida Information Access

Burmese Pythons  Pose Little Risk to People in Everglades

Rainbow over the Owyhee Canyonlands wilderness area

Do April showers stop drought?

Not necessarily, however, USGS hydrologic science can help citizens and communities prepare for and cope with drought - through drought planning, and by helping communities make the best day-to-day management decisions while the drought is taking place.

Learn more:

Water Watch
Drought Monitoring Viewer
Questions and answers about droughts