Radon

The air pressure in the ground around most houses is often greater than the air pressure inside the house. Thus, air tends to move from the disturbed zone, resulting from its construction, into the house through openings in the house's foundation. All...
You can get an idea as to how concerned you should be about radon in your house by learning about the geology of the site and its radon potential. If your house is in an area with a high potential for radon, then chances are that your house may have an...
Radon is a gas produced by the radioactive decay of the element radium. Radioactive decay is a natural, spontaneous process in which an atom of one element decays or breaks down to form another element by losing atomic particles (protons, neutrons, or...
If your home has a radon level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) of air or more, you should take steps to fix your home and reduce the radon level. Contact your state radon office for assistance in finding a qualified radon professional to fix or...
Each state has a radon program and contact, from which you can obtain information. While a map of radon zones show some areas to have lower levels than others, the U.S. Surgeon General encourages all homeowners to test their homes.Learn more:Indoor Air...
Radon is a radionuclide. Radionuclides are radioactive isotopes  (unstable forms of elements). Radioactivity is the release of energy in the form of gamma rays and energetic alpha and beta particles, which occurs when unstable elements decompose to form...