Invasive Species General

Researchers with the USGS Invasive Species Program work on many species and the issues they cause: cactus moths, gypsy moths, quagga and zebra mussels, hydrilla, giant salvinia, West Nile virus, monkeypox, Asian carp, snakehead fish, sea lamprey, Asian...
The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program tracks the status and distribution of introduced aquatic organisms, focusing on freshwater animals, and provides this information in a timely manner for research, management and education.We define nonindigenous...
 Free-ranging snakes representing dozens of species from around the world are discovered in the United States in any given year, usually as a result of escapees or releases from the pet trade, but most of these don't appear to have established a...
USGS research participation was requested by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service because those agencies were faced with a number of complex questions about how they should respond to the presence of giant constrictors in the U.S...
The wide expanses of golden annual grasslands seen in many Arizona and Nevada desert landscapes today are unnatural — the result of massive swaths of invasive, non-native brome grasses. These invasive grasses greatly heighten wildfire risk and frequency...
An invasive species is an introduced, nonnative organism (disease, parasite, plant, or animal) that begins to spread or expand its range from the site of its original introduction and that has the potential to cause harm to the environment, the economy,...