There are a few historic examples of simultaneous eruptions from volcanoes or vents located within about 10 km of each other, but it's very difficult to determine whether one might have caused the other.
On May 18, 1980, at Mount St.
Yes. Crater lakes atop volcanoes are typically the most acid, with pH values as low as 0.1 (very strong acid). Normal lake waters, in contrast, have relatively neutral pH values near 7.0.
Yes. Encounters between aircraft and clouds of volcanic ash are a serious concern.
The violent separation of gas from lava may produce rock froth called pumice.
Geothermal energy, heat energy from the earth's interior, is used to generate electricity in a variety of places throughout the world.
No. Scientists agree that drilling into a volcano would be of questionable usefulness. Not withstanding the enormous expense and technological difficulties in drilling through hot, mushy rock, drilling is unlikely to have much effect.
If another catastrophic caldera-forming Yellowstone eruption were to occur, it quite likely would alter global weather patterns and have enormous effects on human activity, especially agricultural production, for many years.
Yes. Over the past 640,000 years since the last giant eruption at Yellowstone, approximately 80 relatively nonexplosive eruptions have occurred and produced primarily lava flows. This would be the most likely kind of future eruption.
Not usually. Earthquakes associated with eruptions rarely exceed magnitude 5, and these moderate earthquakes are not big enough to destroy the kinds of buildings, houses, and roads that were demolished in the movie.