Seismic

To view a map of latest earthquakes or report a felt earthquake, check the Real-time Earthquake Map. Make sure you're Control Panel settings are allowing you to see earthquakes of all magnitudes
Tsunamis are ocean waves triggered by large earthquakes that occur near or under the ocean, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides, and by onshore landslides in which large volumes of debris fall into the water.
Although earthquake magnitude is one factor that affects tsunami generation, there are other important factors to consider. The earthquake must be a shallow marine event that displaces the seafloor.
Although both are sea waves, a tsunami and a tidal wave are two different and unrelated phenomena. A tidal wave is the wave motion of the tides.
Go to the Earthquake Hazards Program Real-time Earthquake Map.  There are three columns which make up the real-time earthquake map.  The left column comprises the list of earthquakes, the center
The actual rupture duration on the fault (the time it took for the earthquake to take place on the fault and rupture the entire length) was approximately 3 to 4 minutes.
Felt earthquakes on Mount Hood (Oregon) occur every 2 years on the average.
The occurrence of this earthquake will have produced a redistribution of tectonic stresses along and near the boundary between the India plate and the Burma plate.
Volcano eruptions have occurred shortly after earthquakes and they may be linked, but scientists are still debating the topic. Notably, an Andean volcano (Cordon Caulle) began erupting 2 days after the magnitude 9.5 1960 Chile earthquake. 
Theoretically yes, but realistically the answer is probably no. The magnitude of an earthquake is related to the length of the fault on which it occurs. That is, the longer the fault, the larger the earthquake.