Floods

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects data about the country's surface water, such as how much water is flowing in our streams and rivers, and when a river reaches "flood stage". Groundwater is studied—the amount of water stored in underground...
No one knows for sure what would happen if the snow and ice in the polar regions all melted. Sea level would rise, which would flood coastal regions. Climate would be affected worldwide. Isostatic rebound would occur where ice masses were removed from...
Occasionally, a piece of equipment may malfunction or there may be physical problems at a station. USGS tries to correct a station or equipment problem within several days of its first occurrence, and is generally successful in meeting this goal. 
Go to the current water resources conditions site at WaterWatch for a map of real-time streamflow in the United States for the day of the year.Learn more: 'From the River to You: USGS Real-Time Streamflow Information.' 
USGS tries to correct an equipment or station problem within several days of its first occurence, and is generally successful in meeting this goal. Occasionally, replacement parts or equipment may not be readily available, or a station may be...
The term "100-year flood" is used to describe the recurrence interval of floods. The 100-year recurrence interval means that a flood of that magnitude has a one percent chance of occurring in any given year. In other words, the chances that a river will...
1. 1797: A magnitude 8.4 earthquake near the central part of the western Sumatra generated a tsunami that flooded Padang. More than 300 fatalities.2. 1833: A magnitude 8.7 earthquake near the south coast of the western Sumatra triggered a huge tsunami...
At some USGS stream-gage installations, NWS maintains a separate stage sensor that is serviced by NWS technicians. Occasionally, calibration of any sensing device may drift from a 'true' value, so there may be differences between USGS and NWS data...
Stream stage is an important concept when analyzing how much water is moving in a stream at any given moment. Stage is the water level above some arbitrary point in the river and is commonly measured in feet. For example, on a normal day when no rain has...
River forecasts are made by the National Weather Service River Forecast Centers and released through local Weather Service Offices. The NOAA Web site has a map showing the location of the forecast centers, their areas of responsibility, the location of...