Wells

USGS DLG files must be translated into DXF before AutoCAD can read the files. Here is one way this can be accomplished:Download a DLG to DXF converter. There are different versions of this program depending on the version of AutoCAD.DLGTODXF - for...
Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected and analyzed water-use data for the United States and Territories. The is the main webpage for the USGS Water Use Program. This page is the access point to the water-use data that is assessed...
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects data about the country's surface water, such as how much water is flowing in our streams and rivers, and when a river reaches "flood stage". Groundwater is studied—the amount of water stored in underground...
The USGS provides access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Online access to this data is organized around the categories listed to the left.The USGS...
The best way to learn about your local drinking water quality is to read the annual drinking water quality report/consumer confidence report that water suppliers now send out by July 1 of each year. The reports often are sent out with water bills, but...
The USGS Web site Water Resources of the United States can direct you to information about your local water body. Under the heading "Local Information" click on "Local Websites and USGS Contacts in Your State!" There you can select your state on a map to...
A good source of information on home drinking-water treatment technology and performance of specific products is NSF International, which offers a listings database for products on their Consumer Information page. 
The terms 'soft water' and 'hard water' are important here. Water is said to be soft if it has a low concentration of calcium and magnesium ions in it, and hard water has a high concentration of calcium and magnesium. If you use soft water, the ions...
The brown stain is from a large amount of iron in your water. It is closely related to simple rust you see on metal, which is iron oxide. The source of the water you use probably is ground water, and the water has filtered through rocks containing iron-...
The depth to the water table can change (rise or fall) depending on the time of year. During the late winter and spring when accumulated snow starts to melt and spring rainfall is plentiful, water on the surface of the earth infiltrates into the ground...