The U.S. Geological Survey derives its leadership role in landslide hazard-related work from the Disaster Relief Act of 1974 (the Stafford Act). The Director of the USGS has been delegated the responsibility to issue warnings for an earthquake, volcanic...
The world's biggest historic landslide occurred during the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Mountain Range in the State of Washington, USA. The volume of material was 2.8 cubic kilometers (km).  The world's biggest prehistoric...
See the list of  largest landslides in the world. See the list of  largest landslides in the United States.Please Note: This latter list is currently being updated and is not complete. If there are questions, please contact NLIC@usgs.gov for information.
At this time there is no collective landslide inventory for the entire United States. Status of state landslide inventories and links to other world landslide inventories.
Landslides can and do occur in every state and territory of the U.S.; however, the type, severity and frequency of landslide activity varies from place to place, depending on the terrain, geology, and climate. Major storms have caused major or widespread...
Detailed locations of areas susceptible to debris flows are given on "Preliminary Soil-Slip Susceptibility Maps, Southwestern California," published as a U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report.In addition, areas that have been burned by recent wildfires...
Several kinds of maps are used to depict danger from landslides. These maps may be as simple as a map that uses the locations of old landslides to indicate potential instability, or as complex as a quantitative map incorporating probabilities based on...
USGS landslide researchers have ongoing field projects in several areas of the U.S., including parts of the Pacific coastal ranges, Rocky Mountains, and the Appalachians. USGS scientists also respond to major landslide events, including some that result...
It’s not possible to exactly predict the number of days or weeks that landslides remain a danger after heavy rain. Residents near mountain slopes, canyons, and landslide prone areas should stay alert even after heavy rain subsides.  While the likelihood...
Tsunamis are large, potentially deadly and destructive sea waves, most of which are formed as a result of submarine earthquakes. They may also result from the eruption or collapse of island or coastal volcanoes and the formation of giant landslides on...