Tsunamis

On January 19, 1968, a thermonuclear test, codenamed Faultless, took place in the Central Nevada Supplemental Test Area. The codename turned out to be a poor choice of words because a fresh fault rupture some 1200 meters long was produced.
No. Neither the USGS nor any other scientists have ever predicted a major earthquake. They do not know how, and they do not expect to know how any time in the foreseeable future.
Three primary sources of information can be used to answer the question "Could It Happen Here? Tsunamis That Have Struck U.S.
Earthquakes are recorded by a seismographic network. Each seismic station in the network measures the movement of the ground at the site. The slip of one block of rock over another in an earthquake releases energy that makes the ground vibrate.
Learn more: Earthquakes by State/Territory or Earthquakes by Country/Region.
In 2005, the President's tsunami-warning initiative directed $37.5 million to the USGS and NOAA to improve the Nation's domestic tsunami detection and warning system. 
Estimate what EQ of what size are likely to occur (geology)Given the EQ size we then estimate what the shaking will be (seismology)
Tsunamis are ocean waves triggered by large earthquakes that occur near or under the ocean, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides, and by onshore landslides in which large volumes of debris fall into the water.
A fault is a fracture or zone of fractures between two blocks of rock.  Faults allow the blocks to move relative to each other.  This movement may occur rapidly, in the form of an eart
A seismic zone could be one of three things: