Bats

Bats are among the world's least appreciated and most endangered animals.A good starting point for information on bats is USGS Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center's pages on bats.  The web page includes links to other sources of information. You...
Yes. Bats are being found beneath wind turbines all over the world. Bat fatalities have now been documented at most wind facilities in the U.S. and Canada and it is estimated that tens to hundreds of thousands die at wind turbines in North America each...
Unfortunately, it’s not clear yet. It’s possible that wind turbines interfere with seasonal migration and mating patterns in some species of bats. More than three quarters of the bat fatalities observed at wind turbine facilities are from species known...
USGS has a multi-center research plan that partners with several universities that seeks to answer the following issues: better identify the seasonal distributions, habitat needs, and migration patterns of species showing greatest susceptibility continue...
In general, bats seek out a variety of daytime retreats such as caves, rock crevices, old buildings, bridges, mines and trees. Different species require different roost sites. Some species, such as the Mexican free- tailed and gray bats live in large...
No. Bats have small eyes that are functional and sensitive to light. Several bats, such as Rafinesque's and Townsend's big-eared bats, have greatly enlarged ears to help in echolocation, but bats also use sight to perceive their environment. Learn More:...
All healthy bats try to avoid humans by taking flight and are not purposely aggressive. Most bats are about the size of a mouse and use their small teeth and weak jaws to grind up insects. You should avoid handling bats because several species, such as...
Yes, but not in most of the United States. Of the three species of vampires in North America, only a single specimen has been recorded for the United States in extreme southwest Texas. Vampires do not suck blood--they make a small incision with their...
Yes. There are at least 40 different kinds of bats in the U.S. that eat nothing but insects, and a lot of them.  A single little brown bat, which has a body no bigger than an adult human’s thumb, can eat 4 to 8 grams (the weight of about a grape or two)...
Once they locate an insect by echolocation, they often trap it with their wing or tail membranes and then reach down and take the insect into their mouth. This action, as well as the chase, results in the erratic flight most people are familiar with when...