Tsunamis

Three primary sources of information can be used to answer the question "Could It Happen Here? Tsunamis That Have Struck U.S. Coastlines": (1) tsunami catalogs of historical events, (2) the age of geologic deposits left by great earthquakes and tsunamis...
In 2005, the President's tsunami-warning initiative directed $37.5 million to the USGS and NOAA to improve the Nation's domestic tsunami detection and warning system. As part of that commitment, the USGS has received $13.5 million to strengthen its...
Tsunamis are ocean waves triggered by large earthquakes that occur near or under the ocean, volcanic eruptions, submarine landslides, and by onshore landslides in which large volumes of debris fall into the water. Scientists do not use the term "tidal...
Although earthquake magnitude is one factor that affects tsunami generation, there are other important factors to consider. The earthquake must be a shallow marine event that displaces the seafloor. Thrust earthquakes (as opposed to strike slip) are far...
East Coast: Historically, no tsunamis have been generated on the east coast, a consequence of the low level of seismic activity and the lack of vertical fault displacement. No tsunami occurred during the Charleston, South Carolina, earthquake of 1886,...
Although both are sea waves, a tsunami and a tidal wave are two different and unrelated phenomena. A tidal wave is the wave motion of the tides. A tidal wave is a shallow water wave caused by the gravitational interactions between the Sun, Moon, and...
For information on tsunami science and hazard mitigation: NOAA Tsunami webpage Tsunami Fact Sheet from FEMA Tsunami Hazard Mitigation from the University of Washington Other organizations in tsunami monitoring and research include: British Columbia...