Brown Treesnakes

Prevention of spread is paramount. It is much cheaper than intervention once a snake population establishes. Feeding on prey species that are unused to being hunted by snakes, invading brown Treesnakes can remain well-fed with little effort while they...
Whether you live in a house, condominium, or apartment, there are several things you can do to decrease the potential for snakes to enter your living space.  Excluding snakes from buildings depends on closing or eliminating the most minute openings...
As a rear-fanged snake from the family of Colubrid snakes, brown Treesnakes are often classified as non-venomous.  However, as snakes on Guam (with the abundantly available food) have grown to longer lengths than what is found in their native range, some...
To many people's surprise, the answer to this question lies not in what could possibly eat the brown Treesnake but instead what primarily immature snakes themselves eat.  This food source, mainly small lizards, is far more limited in its native range (...
While the birds and mammals were a major part of the snake's diet when it first entered the scene on Guam, these were not the major food sources of immature snakes.  These snakes, as mentioned above, feed primarily on small lizards, which were and still...
Very little is known about diseases or parasites and how they might exert control on a snake population.  Again, the control in the snake's native range is food availability as opposed to any other one factor.
Both of these ideas would bring about the same basic outcome, although the specifics of each differ.  With a bounty, people would be inspired to gather snakes, but they would do so in areas where the snakes were easiest to catch. When numbers were...
Again, the snake habitat would make this extremely difficult, especially for people untrained in locating and dealing with snakes.  Snakes are rarely encountered except at night, and even then many elude detection because they are high in trees, in dense...
Unfortunately, it isn't the heat or frequency of the current in the lines that attracts the snakes.  For an arboreal snake, the poles and power lines are easy to climb and attractive to snakes because they are elevated.  When searching for food and...
This is probably the most frequently asked question regarding the brown Treesnake.  It seems like a simple and obvious solution; however, the many ecological concerns and implications accompanying such a move illustrate the dangers of this tactic.  While...