Water Use

It is not an easy task to keep a swimming pool so clear and clean. If you just set a pan of water outdoors in the middle of summer, you'll see that it ends up containing gunk very quickly. People have to resort to both chemical and physical means to keep...
The earth is estimated to hold about 1,460,000,000 cubic kilometers of water. The breakdown of where all that water resides is estimated as follows:Oceans (saline) 1,419,120,000 cubic kilometersIce caps and glaciers (fresh) 31,244,000 cubic...
Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected and analyzed water-use data for the United States and Territories. The is the main webpage for the USGS Water Use Program. This page is the access point to the water-use data that is assessed...
Many, but not all, fish kills in the summer result from low concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. Fish, like all other complex life forms, need oxygen to survive. They get theirs in the form of oxygen gas dissolved in the water. That's why it'...
Although most energy in the United States is produced by fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants, hydroelectricity is still important to the Nation, as about 7 percent of total power is produced by hydroelectric plants. To create hydroelectric power huge...
The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the surface of the Earth. For a summary go to water cycle.Learn more: Georgia Water Science Center 
The USGS provides access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Online access to this data is organized around the categories listed to the left.The USGS...
Most states have set fish (and wildlife) consumption advisories and recommended consumption levels. The state agency responsible for these limits varies. Examples of consumption advisory information can be found at Consumption Advisories. 
Water leaving our homes generally goes either into a septic tank in the back yard where it evaporates or seeps back into the ground, or is sent to a sewage-treatment plant through a sewer system. In 1995, about 26 percent of the water coming from our...