Avian Influenza

Avian influenza, popularly known as “bird flu”, is a disease primarily found in poultry and wild birds. Avian influenza can infect chickens, pheasants, quail, ducks, geese, and guinea fowl, as well as migratory waterfowl and shorebirds and, less commonly...
The highly pathogenic (HPAI) H5N1 strain of avian influenza has not been detected in the United States or anywhere in North America. Low pathogenic (low probability of creating disease) strains of avian influenza, however, are commonly present in...
There are no documented cases of humans contracting highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 from wild birds. Close contact with infected domestic poultry has been the primary way that people have become infected with the H5N1 virus.There are a few...
As a general rule, people should observe wildlife, including wild birds, from a distance. This protects people from possible exposure to diseases and minimizes disturbance to the animal.Avoid touching wildlife. If there is contact with wildlife, do not...
The designation of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) or highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) refers to the potential for these viruses produce disease. The designation of “low pathogenic” or “highly pathogenic” does not refer to how infectious...
The role of wild birds in the transmission of the highly pathogenic (HPAI) strain of the H5N1 avian influenza virus currently remains unclear. The primary mode of H5N1 spread in Asia appears to be in the poultry trade, but migratory wild birds are...
Bird migration is only one possible route of introduction of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) strain H5N1 into North America.Illegal smuggling of birds and poultry products, travel by infected people or people traveling with virus-contaminated...
Migratory birds usually travel the same routes in their annual migrations. In the Northern Hemisphere, birds begin moving south during August and September of each year. This includes species that migrate south from Alaska to locations in east Asia, or...
Yes. In May 2005, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was detected for the first time in wild birds at Lake Qinghai, in China, where bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) died. This marked the first time since 1961 in which large numbers of wild...
Avian influenza viruses have mostly been detected in wild waterfowl (ducks, geese, and swans) and shorebirds (wading birds), gulls, and terns.With few exceptions, the thousands of flu strains found in wild birds have been low pathogenic avian influenza (...