Migratory birds usually travel the same routes in their annual migrations. In the Northern Hemisphere, birds begin moving south during August and September of each year. This includes species that migrate south from Alaska to locations in east Asia, or...
Yes. In May 2005, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was detected for the first time in wild birds at Lake Qinghai, in China, where bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) died. This marked the first time since 1961 in which large numbers of wild...
There are no documented cases of wild birds directly transmitting avian influenza to people, and there is no indication that waterfowl or other wild birds hunted in the United States carry highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1. While experts...
Avian influenza viruses have mostly been detected in wild waterfowl (ducks, geese, and swans) and shorebirds (wading birds), gulls, and terns.With few exceptions, the thousands of flu strains found in wild birds have been low pathogenic avian influenza (...
The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) is responsible for managing and protecting wildlife, including migratory birds, under various laws and treaties, and for protecting public health on more than 500 million acres of land that it manages across the...
Pandemicflu.govUSGS National Wildlife Health CenterUSGS Alaska Science CenterUS Department of AgricultureCenters For Disease Control 
The USGS actively monitors for Avian Influenza (Bird Flu).FLU.gov has information on seasonal flu, symptons, prevention, treatment, preparedness and pandemic awareness.