Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and...
Although debate still occurs, the vast majority of research indicates that the causative agent of chronic wasting disease is a misfolded protein called a prion. All mammals produce normal prions (abbreviated PrP) that are used by cells, then degraded and...
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has an extended incubation period averaging 18–24 months between infection and the onset of clinical signs. The most obvious clinical sign of CWD is progressive weight loss. Numerous behavioral changes also have been...
Testing for chronic wasting disease requires the microscopic examination of a specific portion of the brain or lymph nodes. A biopsy technique for tonsilar tissues from live deer has been developed; however, this test does not work for all effected...
Chronic wasting disease has been found in at least 17 states and parts of Canada, with the highest U.S. concentrations in the Colorado/Wyoming/Nebraska region and the Wisconsin/Illinois region. For the most up to date information, see the USDA Chronic...