Publications

USGS publishes an array of scientific products including maps, reports, data and models. Those pertaining to Hurricane Sandy can be found here. You can also find maps, imagery and publications or visit the USGS Publications Warehouse.

Most Recent
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Water-level response in back-barrier bays unchanged following Hurricane Sandy.

5/02/2014 Study shows that flooding in coastal areas bordering Great South Bay, N.Y. and Barnegat Bay, N.J. caused by winter storms that occurred following Hurricane Sandy was not influenced by changes Sandy made to barrier islands or other bay features.

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Hurricane Sandy: Observations and Analysis of Coastal Change

6/03/2014 Analysis of pre- and post-storm lidar elevations was used to quantify magnitudes of change in shoreline position, dune elevation, and beach width. Erosion was observed along the coast from North Carolina to New York; however, as would be expected over such a large region, extensive spatial variability in storm response was observed.

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Interior's Strategic Sciences Group report on scenarios of Hurricane Sandy's impacts

12/01/2013 Hurricane Sandy made US landfall near Atlantic City, NJ on 29 October 2012, causing 72 direct deaths, displacing thousands of individuals from damaged or destroyed dwellings, and leaving over 8.5 million homes without power across the northeast and mid-Atlantic.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—New York

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—Coastal Impact Assessments

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—Impacts of Environmental Quality and Persisting Contaminant Exposures

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—Impacts of Storm Surge, Including Disturbed Estuarine and Bay Hydrology

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—Impacts to Coastal Ecosystems, Habitats, and Fish and Wildlife

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards.

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Hurricane Sandy Science Plan—Coastal Topographic and Bathymetric Data to Support Hurricane Impact Assessment and Response

10/24/2013 Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards.

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Coastal Change from Hurricane Sandy and the 2012–13 Winter Storm Season: Fire Island, New York

8/27/2013 The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mounted a substantial effort in response to Hurricane Sandy including an assessment of the morphological impacts to the beach and dune system at Fire Island, New York. Field surveys of the beach and dunes collected just prior to and after landfall were used to quantify change in several focus areas.

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The Science Plan: Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy—A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery

7/01/2013 This science plan was developed immediately following Hurricane Sandy to coordinate continuing USGS activities with other agencies and to guide continued data collection and analysis to ensure support for recovery and restoration efforts.

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National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards: Mid-Atlantic Coast

7/01/2013 Beaches serve as a natural buffer between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and natural resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During extreme storms, changes to beaches can be large, and the results are sometimes catastrophic. Lives may be lost, communities destroyed, and millions of dollars spent on rebuilding.

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National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards: Southeast Atlantic Coast

7/01/2013 Beaches serve as a natural barrier between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and natural resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During extreme storms, changes to beaches can be large, and the results are sometimes catastrophic. Lives may be lost, communities destroyed, and millions of dollars spent on rebuilding.

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National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards: Gulf of Mexico

5/01/2012 Sandy beaches provide a natural barrier between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During a hurricane, these changes can be large and sometimes catastrophic.

Coastal Topography–Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012
Coastal Topography–Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

5/16/2013 This Data Series contains LIDAR-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, dune elevations, and mean-high-water shoreline position datasets for most sandy beaches for Fire Island, New York, and from Cape Henlopen, Delaware to Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The data were acquired post-Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall as an extra tropical cyclone on October 29, 2012

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Changing the Paradigm of Response to Coastal Storms

5/21/2013 Federal, state, and local agencies mounted a massive preparation and response to post–tropical storm Sandy, which made landfall along the northern New Jersey coast on 29 October 2012. The data collected and knowledge gained in response to Sandy are unprecedented and provide critical information to agencies, local emergency responders, and coastal managers and planners.

 NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of the massive Hurricane Sandy on October 28 at 1302 UTC (9:02 a.m. EDT), about a day and a half before it made landfall on the New Jersey coast. The line of clouds from the Gulf of Mexico north are associated with the cold front that Sandy is merging with. Sandy’s western cloud edge is already over the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States.
USGS Scientists Predict, Measure Sandy’s Impacts on the Coastal Landscape

12/1/2014 Hurricane Sandy, one of the biggest storms ever to hit the United States, struck the Eastern Seaboard on October 29, 2012. It caused dozens of deaths and billions of dollars worth of damage and displaced massive volumes of protective beach and dune sediments. Before, during, and after Sandy’s landfall, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists in St. Petersburg, Florida, predicted, then measured, the change that took place along the shore.