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Bienvenidos Puerto Rico! (English)
The “Isle of Enchantment” is added as The National Map Corps Crowd-Sourcing Project continues to grow
Released: 6/26/2014 10:00:00 AM

Contact Information:
U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Communications and Publishing
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr, MS 119
Reston, VA 20192
Mark Newell, APR 1-click interview
Phone: 573-308-3850

Erin Korris 1-click interview
Phone: 303-202-4503

Elizabeth McCartney 1-click interview
Phone: 573-308-3696



Since August 2013, all 50 states have been available for editing under the USGS The National Map Corps Volunteer Geographic Information project. Starting this month, TNMCorps is pleased to add Puerto Rico to that list.

Using crowd-sourcing techniques, TNMCorps encourages citizen volunteers to collect data about manmade structures in an effort to provide accurate and authoritative spatial map data for the USGS National Geospatial Program’s web-based The National Map

Through an online map editor, volunteers use aerial imagery and other resources to improve structures data by adding new features, removing obsolete points, and correcting existing data. Points available to edit include schools, hospitals, post offices, police stations and other important public buildings. Volunteers may find editing structures in Puerto Rico quite challenging, as some source data points shown in the map editor may be out of date, and some structure types are missing entirely.

 "I appreciate the opportunity to participate with The National Map Corps and, from time to time, field verify USGS structures in my community”, said Reuben, a crowd-sourcing volunteer from Washington state. “The National Map has provided for some enjoyable weekend trips... with a bit of a purpose.

In an effort to show appreciation to our volunteers, TNMCorps has instituted a recognition program that awards "virtual" badges" based on the number of points edited.  Badges consist of a series of antique surveying instruments ranging from the Circle of the Surveyor's Chain (25 – 50 points) to the Theodolite Assemblage (2000+ points). Additionally, volunteers are publically recognized (with permission) via Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.

Volunteers only need access to a computer and the Internet to participate.  The National Map Corps’ website explains how volunteers can edit any area, regardless of their familiarity with the selected structures. Registration is simple and requires only an email address and self-selected username. 

Participants make a significant addition to the USGS's ability to provide accurate information to the public. Data collected by volunteers become part of The National Map structures dataset which is available to users free of charge.

See for yourself how much fun participating can be. Go to The National Map Corps home page and give it a try.

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Screen shot of The National Map Corps editor webpage showing a university at the end of the Isla Grande Airport – which is why The National Map Corps needs your help.  (Larger version)
caption below
Badges awarded for submitting edits, shown in from first to last: Order of the Surveyor’s Chain (25-49), Society of the Steel Tape 50-99), Pedometer Posse (100-199), Surveyor’s Compass (200-499), Stadia Board Society (500-999), Alidade Alliance (1000-1999), and Theodolite Assemblage (2000+).

(Spanish version)


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