This release can be found in the USGS Newsroom at: http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=2109.

USGS main page

News Release


January 16, 2009
Joan Fitzpatrick 303-236-7881 jfitz@usgs.gov
Jessica Robertson 703-648-6624 jrobertson@usgs.gov

Arctic Heats Up More than Other Places

Bookmark and Share

Glacier and Ice-Sheet Melting, Sea-Ice Retreat and Coastal Erosion Expected as a Result

Temperature change in the Arctic is happening at a greater rate than other places in the Northern Hemisphere, and this is expected to continue in the future.

As a result, glacier and ice-sheet melting, sea-ice retreat, coastal erosion and sea level rise can be expected to continue.

A new comprehensive scientific synthesis of past Arctic climates demonstrates for the first time the pervasive nature of Arctic climate amplification.

The U.S. Geological Survey led this new assessment, which is a synthesis of published science literature and authored by a team of climate scientists from academia and government. The U.S. Climate Change Science Program commissioned the report, which has contributions from 37 scientists from the United States, Germany, Canada, the United Kingdom and Denmark.

Related Podcasts

Arctic Heats Up More than Other Places

download Download directly | Details

podcast icon  itunes icon
or subscribe by e-mail.

The new report also makes several conclusions about the Arctic:

"By integrating research on the past 65 million years of climate change in the entire circum-Arctic, we have a better understanding on how climate change affects the Arctic and how those effects may impact the whole globe," said USGS Director Mark Myers. "This report provides the first comprehensive analysis of the real data we have on past climate conditions in the Arctic, with measurements from ice cores, sediments and other Earth materials that record temperature and other conditions."

To view the full report, titled Synthesis and Assessment Product 1.2: Past Climate Variability and Change in the Arctic and at High Latitudes, and a summary brochure on this report, visit www.climatescience.gov.

For a podcast interview with USGS Scientist Joan Fitzpatrick on this report, listen to episode 82 of CoreCast.


USGS provides science for a changing world. For more information, visit www.usgs.gov.

Subscribe to USGS News Releases via our electronic mailing list or RSS feed.

**** www.usgs.gov ****

Links and contacts within this release are valid at the time of publication.

Bookmark and Share