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Nonpoint-source pollution
Contamination of the environment from sources spread widely across an area, not from a small number of identifiable locations.
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Results 1 - 11 of 11 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
A Whole-System Approach to Understanding Agricultural Chemicals in the Environment [More info]
Explains the effects of the interaction of hydrologic and biological processes on agricultural chemicals in various environments.
Great Lakes Beach Health Initiative [More info]
Research and development efforts to improve our ability to provide scientific information needed by local beach managers faced with questions about environmental quality and possible beach closure or resource usage.
Hypoxia [More info]
A brief definition and explanation of hypoxia with special reference to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone along the Louisiana-Texas coast as well as extensive links to USGS and other related information resources.
Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico and related USGS activities [More info]
Information about the causes and impact of hypoxia with links to USGS and other Federal agency information and activities related to nutrients in the Mississippi River Basin and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.
Nutrients in the Nation's streams and groundwater: National findings and implications [More info]
Despite public sector efforts to reduce nonpoint-source nutrients in streams and rivers, concentrations have remained the same or increased, continuing to pose risks to aquatic life and human health.
PDF Organic Compounds in Clackamas River Water Used for Public Supply near Portland, Oregon, 2003-05 [More info]
In all, 56 compounds were detected in samples collected approximately monthly during 2003-05 at the intake for the Clackamas River Water plant. On the basis of this screening-level assessment, adverse effects to human health are assumed to be negligible.
PDF Organic compounds in White River water used for public supply near Indianapolis, Indiana, 2002-05 [More info]
Measured concentrations of many compounds in water people use. Some compounds are regulated as health hazards; a few of these were over the benchmark limits. Others may become issues of concern, so studies such as this give us helpful background levels.
PDF Response of lake chemistry to atmospheric deposition and climate in selected Class I wilderness areas in the western United States, 1993-2009 [More info]
Sulfate deposition to high-elevation areas has decreased here as a result of reductions in SO2 emissions. Nitrate deposition did not change, whereas ammonium deposition increased, particularly at sites near urban and agricultural areas.
The Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone [More info]
Information and links to USGS and other Federal agency monitoring and research concerning the hypoxic zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurring along the Louisiana-Texas coast.
PDF Understanding beach health throughout the Great Lakes -- Continuing research [More info]
Outlines tactical problems that make it difficult for beach managers to use scientific information to make beach closure and advisory decisions. Explains methodologies we are using to address those problems and better prepare local decision makers.
PDF Understanding beach health throughout the Great Lakes-Entering a new era of investigations [More info]
People who manage recreational areas need better, more timely estimates of the likelihood that the beach and lake waters will be hazardous to human health, and which factors cause those hazards.
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