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Terrestrial ecosystems
Communities of living organisms in a specific geographical location which exist primarily on land and not in water.
Subtopics:
Coastal ecosystems (38 items)
Desert ecosystems (12 items)
Forest ecosystems (23 items)
Grassland ecosystems (16 items)
Island ecosystems (1 items)
Shrubland ecosystems (6 items)
Tundra ecosystems (4 items)
Related topics:


Results 21 - 30 of 105 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
PDF Biological soil crusts: webs of life in the desert [More info]
Fact sheet on the need to protect biological soil crusts in the desert. These crusts are most of the soil surface in deserts not covered by green plants and are inhabited by cyanobacterium (blue-green algae) and other organisms useful to the ecosystem.
Birds of a feather [More info]
Explains how critical information about dispersal and gene flow in sage-grouse populations can be obtained from the DNA coded in the sage-grouse feathers collected at their communal breeding grounds, which are called "leks".
PDF Born of fire: restoring sagebrush steppe [More info]
USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center: fact sheet in Adobe PDF about the studies to restore sagebrush steppe
Boston Harbor ecosystems [More info]
This web site is an outgrowth of an agreement between the USGS and the New England Aquarium, designed to summarize and make available results of scientific research. It will also present educational material of interest to wide audiences.
PDF Bryophytes and lichens, small but indispensable forest dwellers [More info]
Description of bryophytes (mosses, liverworts, and hornworts) and lichens (dual organisms of a fungus and an alga or a cyanobacterium) that are part of forest ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest with information on habitat and conservation.
PDF Buffelgrass-Integrated modeling of an invasive plant [More info]
Buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) poses a problem in the deserts of the United States, growing in dense stands and introducing a wildfire risk in an ecosystem not adapted to fire. This report explains what we are doing to help mitigate its effects.
Changing Arctic Ecosystems-Measuring and forecasting the response of Alaska's terrestrial ecosystem to a warming climate [More info]
Combining genetic data with current and predicted climate scenarios, we are modeling the predicted future distributions of wildlife populations in the Arctic and identifying key environmental variables that determine important animal habitat.
Changing Arctic ecosystems-Research to understand and project changes in marine and terrestrial ecosystems of the Arctic [More info]
Three themes of ongoing research: forecasting polar bear and walrus population response to changing marine ecosystems; measuring wildlife population changes in the Arctic coastal plain, and wildlife communities in the boreal-Arctic transition zone.
Changing Arctic ecosystems: ecology of loons in a changing Arctic [More info]
Changes in Arctic sea ice and permafrost will likely affect populations of wildlife. Migratory birds such as loons rely on freshwater lakes in the Arctic for nesting and food supply; we are studying how their populations are affected by these changes.
Changing Arctic ecosystems: sea ice decline, permafrost thaw, and benefits for geese [More info]
Loss of sea ice has increased ocean wave action, changing coastal habitats. For some geese this has been a positive change, increasing the amount of coastal area that supports vegetation the geese feed on.
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