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Toxic radionuclide contamination
Introduction into the environment of unstable isotopes of elements that undergo radioactive decay, emitting radiation that is harmful to organisms.
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Results 1 - 12 of 12 listed by similarity [list alphabetically]
Occurrence of selected radionuclides in ground water used for drinking water in the United States [More info]
Results (*.pdf) of a 1998 targeted reconnaissance survey on the sources of radium, polonium, and lead radionuclides, data collection and laboratory methods, existing occurrences in drinking water, risk assessments, and compliance monitoring.
Groundwater quality in the Central Sierra Nevada, California [More info]
Recent study indicates that inorganic trace elements and radioactive constituents are more likely to be subjects of concern in this less-developed area than anthropogenic organic compounds.
Groundwater quality in the Colorado River basins, California [More info]
Five trace elements with human-health concerns were detected at high concentrations: arsenic, boron, fluoride, molybdenum, and strontium. Chromium was detected at moderate concentrations.
Groundwater quality in the Indian Wells Valley, California [More info]
Five trace elements with human-health concerns were detected at high concentrations: arsenic, boron, molybdenum, strontium, and vanadium. Chromium and fluoride were detected at moderate concentrations.
Groundwater quality in the Madera and Chowchilla subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley, California [More info]
Uranium, arsenic, and nitrate were the inorganic constituents that were most frequently detected at high concentrations, mostly in shallower wells. High and moderate concentrations of arsenic were detected in deeper wells.
Groundwater quality in the Mojave area, California [More info]
Six elements with human-health concerns were detected at high concentrations: arsenic, boron, fluoride, molybdenum, strontium, and vanadium. Lead was present at moderate concentrations.
Groundwater quality in the Northern San Joaquin Valley, California [More info]
Arsenic and boron were the trace elements that most frequently occurred at high concentrations. Fumigants (pesticides) were detected at high concentrations in 3% of the primary aquifers. Herbicides and insecticides were detected at low concentrations.
Groundwater quality in the Southern Sierra Nevada, California [More info]
Recent study indicating inorganic constituents as the primary items of concern in this area. Chemical and mineralogical compositions of the aquifer rocks probably explain variation among localities here.
Maps of the distribution and occurrence of ground water quality constituents and early 1970's land use in New Jersey [More info]
Links to maps of New Jersey showing nitrate levels, pesticides, Total Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), and radium in wells and land use of the 1970s.
National analysis of trace elements in ground water, streams, stream and reservoir sediment, and fish and clam tissue across the United States [More info]
Trace elements are inorganic chemicals occurring in small amounts in nature. This web site of the National Water Quality Assessment links to U.S. data, publications, news, and other sites on trace metals, metalloids and radionuclides in water.
Radon in earth, air, and water [More info]
Links to USGS publications, bibliographies, and maps on radon in the U.S., plus links to non-USGS sites with information on radon.
PDF Understanding processes affecting mineral deposits in humid environments [More info]
Contaminants from mines move more easily from ore materials and mine waste piles to surrounding estuaries and living organisms when water moves through the mine site. Geochemical results shown here will help people mitigate the negative effects.
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