USGS - science for a changing world

Science Topics

Maps, Imagery, and Publications Hazards Newsroom Education Jobs Partnerships Library About USGS Podcasts/RSS
You are here: Categories > Topics > Elements
Help
Chemical elements
Chemical substances distinguished by atomic number. http://periodic.lanl.gov/
Subtopics:
Aluminum (3 items)
Antimony (1 items)
Arsenic (14 items)
Astatine (1 items)
Barium (2 items)
Beryllium (2 items)
Boron (7 items)
Bromine (1 items)
Cadmium (3 items)
Carbon (7 items)
Cerium (4 items)
Chlorine (2 items)
Chromium (8 items)
Cobalt (3 items)
Copper (4 items)
Dysprosium (5 items)
Erbium (5 items)
Europium (5 items)
Fluorine (6 items)
Gadolinium (5 items)
Gallium (1 items)
Germanium (1 items)
Gold (3 items)
Holmium (5 items)
Iodine (1 items)
Iron (3 items)
Lanthanum (4 items)
Lead (8 items)
Lutetium (5 items)
Magnesium (1 items)
Manganese (1 items)
Mercury (8 items)
Molybdenum (7 items)
Neodymium (5 items)
Nickel (3 items)
Niobium (1 items)
Nitrogen (3 items)
Phosphorus (4 items)
Platinum (1 items)
Potassium (1 items)
Praseodymium (5 items)
Prometium (5 items)
Radium (1 items)
Radon (2 items)
Samarium (5 items)
Scandium (1 items)
Selenium (3 items)
Silver (1 items)
Strontium (6 items)
Sulfur (1 items)
Tantalum (1 items)
Terbium (5 items)
Thulium (5 items)
Tin (2 items)
Titanium (1 items)
Tungsten (2 items)
Uranium (4 items)
Vanadium (7 items)
Ytterbium (5 items)
Yttrium (4 items)
Zinc (6 items)


Results 51 - 60 of 65 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
Principal aquifers can contribute radium to sources of drinking water under certain geochemical conditions [More info]
Knowledge of the geochemical processes controlling radium occurrence in groundwater may help water-resource managers anticipate and minimize human exposure to this cancer-causing element.
Radon in earth, air, and water [More info]
Links to USGS publications, bibliographies, and maps on radon in the U.S., plus links to non-USGS sites with information on radon.
PDF Rare earth elements--End use and recyclability [More info]
Rare earth element use is changing with technology. This report explains how we use them and the prospects for recycling these important commodities.
Reservoir sediment studies in Kansas [More info]
Report of completed reservoir sediment studies in Kansas using a combination of bathymetric surveying, sediment coring, chemical analysis, and statistical analysis to understand the quantity and quality of deposited sediment.
PDF Selenium and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the benthic clam Corbula amurensis from Northern San Francisco Bay, California: May 1995-February 2010 [More info]
Monthly selenium concentration in this keystone species shows strong spatial and seasonal variation in a five-year series of analyses.
PDF The concept of geologic carbon sequestration [More info]
Explains securing carbon dioxide in deep geologic formations to prevent its release to the atmosphere and contribution to global warming as a greenhouse gas.
PDF The future of rare earth elements--will these high-tech industry elements continue in short supply? [More info]
Presentation describing uses of rare earth elements, why they are important, where they occur and are produced, and aspects of the economics of production and consumption with emphasis on sites that might be developed for production.
PDF The principal rare earth elements deposits of the United States-A summary of domestic deposits and a global perspective [More info]
Explains the geologic setting in which these deposits are found, with information about production and the processes used to extract these valuable mineral resources.
PDF The rare-earth elements: vital to modern technologies and lifestyles [More info]
Explains where and how deposits of these elements form, trends in supply and demand, how we use them, and how they may affect the environment.
PDF Thermal Properties of Methane Gas Hydrates [More info]
This unusual form of hydrocarbons can alter the thermal properties of host sediments; the analysis presented here helps us understand how those sediments might behave under natural or human-induced changes in the environment.
Result pages:Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 NextAll
Alphabetical Index of Topics a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/science//science/science.php?thcode=2&term=1427&b=50&n=10&order=alpha
Page Contact Information: Ask USGS