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U.S. Geological Survey Activities Related to American Indians and Alaska Natives
Fiscal Year 1997

| Contents | List of Tribes/Tribal Governments | Organizations or Events | State Listing | Introduction | Educational Activities | Environmental Activities | Resource Activities | Technical Assistance | General Coordination & Policy Activities | Future Opportunities | USGS Contacts |

Technical Assistance

General National Mapping Program Activities. The National Mapping Division (NMD) of the USGS conducts the National Mapping program of the United States. Cartographic, geographic, and remotely sensed information in digital, graphic, and image form are collected and distributed in support of Federal, State, Tribal, and local governments, private organizations, and the general public. All Indian lands in the country have been mapped at 1:250,000 scale or larger. Digital data are available from 1:100,000-scale maps for the lower 49 States.

To expedite the collection of digital geospatial data in those areas where they do not exist, the NMD enters into collaborative efforts with Federal, Tribal, State, and local governments and the private sector. Federal dollars are leveraged with funding from these organizations. This is accomplished through various cooperative partnership mechanisms such as work/cost-share agreements and data exchanges.

In addition, the Interior Geographic Data Committee (IGDC) coordinates and collects the requirements for high-priority digital geospatial base data among the bureaus of the Department of the Interior (DoI). Under the DoI High Priority Digital Base Data program, the USGS annually solicits DoI bureaus for their requirements, and a working group of the IGDC determines the priority areas where geospatial data are needed to support natural resource and land management issues in the upcoming fiscal year. Tribal requirements for USGS geospatial data are typically gathered through BIA area offices and submitted by the BIA as part of this process. Contact: Joye DuRant, 703-648-5789, jldurant@usgs.gov

Specific National Mapping Program Activities. The USGS conducts mapping activities covering Indian lands in cooperation with the BIA and Indian Tribal governments. Under cooperative cost-share or full-repay agreements, the USGS has provided standard digital elevation data, orthophotoquad image products, and map revision needed by these cooperating organizations to support studies and applications conducted on Indian lands.

There were no cooperatively funded agreements between the USGS and individual Tribal governments specifically for the production of digital mapping data on Indian lands in Fiscal Year 1997. However, $1.6 million of USGS funds were used to produce digital base data to support the high priority projects identified specifically by the BIA under the DoI High Priority Digital Base Data Program. Digital elevation model (DEM), digital line graph (DLG), digital orthophotoquads (DOQ), and digital raster graphics (DRG) data were produced to support BIA projects in the Pacific Northwest for forest, habitat, and watershed planning for the President's Forest Plan, monitoring of the spotted owl, and resource management studies on Indian reservations. The DLG and DOQ data were also produced to support the Prairie Management program for range inventory and improvement, and other BIA natural resource management programs concerned with range and farm pasture, in the Great Plains Grasslands. The DEM, DLG, DOQ, and DRG data were produced to support development of digital mapping data bases for social, economic, and ecological analyses in Humboldt Basin, Nevada, in Utah, and in Arizona. The DEM and DOQ data were produced to support management of natural resources and protection of natural and cultural resources on Indian Reservations in Colorado. In addition to the above project areas, an additional $6.3 million under the DoI High Priority Digital Base Data Program was used to produce digital base data in other geographic areas to meet the high priority requirements of the combined DoI bureaus, including those of BIA.

The last USGS cost-shared cooperative agreement for specific mapping of Indian lands was with the BIA Aberdeen Area Office in 1994, for the production of digital elevation data for Indian lands in areas of North Dakota and Nebraska. In 1996, the USGS entered into an interagency agreement with the BIA Anadarko Area Office to provide automated mapping technology transfer and technical assistance. Also, in 1996, a Competitive Cooperative Agreement was awarded to the BIA for software development for public access to Alaska's Public Land Survey System. Contact: Joye DuRant, 703-648-5789, jldurant@usgs.gov

Department of the Interior High-Priority Digital Base Data Program Summary of BIA Projects. The following projects were conducted by the USGS National Mapping Division in response to the Department of the Interior's Fiscal Year 1997 priorities for mapping requirements of the BIA. Abbreviations are as follows: digital elevation model (DEM); digital line graph (DLG); digital orthophotoquad (DOQ); and digital raster graphics (DRG).

U.S./Mexico Border* Multi-year program initiated in Fiscal Year 1995 by the U.S./Mexico Border Field Coordinating Committee to develop a spatial data infrastructure to support public and private sector applications of geospatial data in such areas as land management, transportation, community development, agriculture, emergency response, environmental protection, and law enforcement. Other non-DoI Federal and State agencies will benefit from the production of these data. 2940-DOQ

Alaska* Multi-year program initiated in Fiscal Year 1996 by the Alaska Geographic Data Committee to support numerous activities including upland acreage calculations for the Alaska Land Transfer Program; support forest inventory and planning on Indian Reservations, timber sales planning and development, forest protection, location and status of native allotments, location and inventory of cultural sites; water rights quantifications; subsistence harvest management and enforcement; oil spill contingency planning; title navigability determinations; land acquisition activities; recreation management; flood disaster prediction; habitat enhancement, protection, and restoration; volcanic hazards modeling; fire behavior modeling; and disaster planning and response. Other non-DoI Federal and State agencies will benefit from the production of these data. 902- DEM; 775-DLG; 2522-DRG

Greater Yellowstone* Multi-year program initiated in Fiscal Year 1997 by the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee to provide necessary data to officials and scientists for conducting resource investigations and ecosystem studies; to assist water managers in analyzing agricultural consumptive water use as mandated by Federal law; to support management of endangered species, fisheries, waterfowl and other migratory birds, river ecology, and resource management and planning; support vegetation mapping and the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program. Other non-DoI Federal and State agencies will benefit from the production of these data. 22-DEM; 1091-DOQ

Pacific Northwest Support forest, habitat, and watershed planning for the President's Forest Plan, monitoring of the spotted owl, and resource management studies on Indian Reservations. 3-DEM; 213-DLG; 112-DOQ; 2057-DRG

Humboldt Basin Nevada Support the development of digital data bases for social, economic, and ecological analyses. 1-DEM; 16-DOQ

Utah Support the development of digital data bases for social, economic, and ecological analyses. 27-DEM; 84-DOQ

Colorado Support management of natural resources and protection of natural and cultural resources on Indian Reservations. 3-DEM; 227- DOQ

Arizona Support development of digital data bases for social, economic, and ecological analyses. 241-DEM; 152-DLG; 80-DOQ; 1088-DRG

Great Plains Grasslands Support the Prairie Management Program (range inventory and improvement) and other natural resource management programs concerned with range and farm pasture. 261-DLG; 64-DOQ

Contact: Debbie Moreland,703-648-5163,dmoreland@usgs.gov

* Estimated project description, and number of products for these priority areas represent a combined DoI bureau response through the coordinating committees identified in the project description column. Individual bureau requirements have not been not specified.

Technical Support of Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. USGS BRD scientists provided technical assistance to the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission on potential directions for research relating to: (1) processes influencing reproduction and recruitment of walleye and (2) development of classification systems for lakes in the Treaty Ceded Territories of Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota. Contact: Director, Great Lakes Science Center, 313-994-3331 ext. 206

Workshop on Lampreys. The Hammond Bay Biological Station of BRD's Great Lakes Science Center, in cooperation with the Chippewa/Ottawa Treaty Management Authority, conducted a highly successful workshop on non-fatal wounding of fish by sea lamprey, in conjunction with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. The workshop was held in April 1997, and attended by over 40 scientists from the Fisheries Commission, U. S. Forest Service, 4 States, Ontario, the University of Michigan, and tribal representatives from the Bay Mills Indian Community, the Grand Traverse Band of Chippewa and Ottawa Indians, and the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community. The purpose of the meeting was to foster greater consistency in the classification and recording of sea lamprey marks observed on Great Lakes fish by the various fisheries agencies conducting sampling programs. Marks are left on host fish whenever non-fatal attacks are made by parasitic sea lampreys. Accurately recording the number and healing stage of these marks in fish samples is critical for assessment of sea lamprey abundance and estimating the damage to their hosts. Contact: Director, Great Lakes Science Center, 313-994-3331 ext. 206

Demonstration for the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan. The USGS demonstrated borehole-geophysical logs at Bay Mills Indian Community for the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan (ITCM). The USGS scientists also met with ITCM and a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency liaison to discuss Tribal environmental priorities in Michigan. Contact: Jim Nicholas, 517-887-8906, jrnichol@usgs.gov

Technical Assistance on Optimizing Fish Habitat. At the request of the Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone Tribes (Wind River), BRD scientists from the Colorado Cooperative Research Unit demonstrated how to configure the bottom of an enlarged reservoir to optimize fish habitat. Contact: Leader, Colorado Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, 970-491-5396

Provision of GAP Data. The BRD New Mexico Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at New Mexico State University provided long-term Tribal cooperators in the New Mexico GAP program with data applicable to Tribal lands. Participating Tribes include the Navajo Nation's Natural Heritage Program, the Pueblo of Zuni, and the Mescalero Apache Tribe. Contact: New Mexico Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Unit, 505-646- 6053

Hydrologic Demonstrations for the White Mountain Apache. During monitoring of streamflow gaging stations located on the White Mountain Apache lands, a USGS hydrologic technician demonstrated how to make flow measurements and maintain streamflow gaging stations to employees from the White Mountain Apache Tribe. The USGS also assisted the Tribe in reactivating several discontinued streamflow gaging stations on the Fort Apache Reservation. Contact: Owen Baynham, 602-379-3088 ext. 235, orbaynh@usgs.gov

GAP Vegetation. GAP, or Gap Analysis program, is BRD's landscape approach to biodiversity planning through which scientists help resolve the difficult issues of land cover mapping, vertebrate habitat characterization, assessment, and biodiversity conservation at a sub-State, e.g. Tribal, State, Regional, and National level. The BRD program seeks to facilitate cooperative development and use of GAP information. GAP data are often integrated into GIS to describe the extent and conditions of natural resources. With approval of the Tribe, USGS is verifying GAP vegetation plots on the White Mountain Apache reservation. The GAP project seeks to fill in data that are currently lacking ("gaps ") needed for GIS. The Tribe will receive the data in a GIS format so the data may be used in preparation of the Tribal forest management plan. Contact: Director, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Research Center, 541-750-7307

Field Work with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The USGS conducted a field exercise with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes to check the accuracy of field techniques and equipment for measuring streamflow. Contact: Charles Parrett, 406-441-1319, cparrett@usgs.gov

Helping the Makah Tribe with Sick Fish. The wet laboratories of the BRD were used to test an emergency new animal drug application, as requested by the Makah Tribe in northwestern Washington. Veterinarians with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service treated chinook salmon from Tribal hatcheries with amoxicillin to control an explosive outbreak of furunculosis. The treatment was successful and the Food and Drug Administration was petitioned to allow the procedure since the bacteria was not responding to approved drugs used by Tribal fish culturists. Contact: Director, Western Fisheries Research Center, 206-526-6282

Dolly Varden Trout. The Village of Noatak assisted BRD scientists by obtaining overwintering fish for testing. BRD found that Dolly Varden trout, or "char," do not eat while in freshwater during the winter to conserve energy. With the help of the Village, scientists determined that the Dolly Varden are in good health, and their numbers and sizes are normal. This is good news, since Dolly Varden is an important subsistence species. Contact: Leader, Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, 907-474-7661

Surface-Water Monitoring Stations. The USGS operates the following streamgaging stations:

Number
of Stations
Cooperator
8 Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe
  Contact: Ralph Teller-South Dakota, 605-394-1780 ext. 222, rwteller@usgs.gov
1 Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes
9 Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (Flathead Reservation)
1 Blackfeet Tribe
4 Northern Cheyenne Tribe
8 Bureau of Indian Affairs
  Contact: Ronald Shields-Montana, 406-441-1319, rshields@usgs.gov
30 Arapahoe-Shoshone Joint Business Council
  Contact: Theodore Bartke-Wyoming, 307-778-2931 ext. 2709, tcbartke@usgs.gov
8 Bureau of Indian Affairs
  Contact: Cynthia Abeyta-New Mexico, 505-262-5358, cgabeyta@usgs.gov
1 Nez Perce Tribe
4 Bureau of Indian Affairs
  Contact: Thomas Brennan-Idaho, 208-387-1366, tbrennan@usgs.gov
1 Bureau of Indian Affairs & Peabody Coal Co. (Navajo Nation)
3 Bureau of Indian Affairs & Peabody Coal Co. (Hopi Reservation)
1 Arizona Department of Water Resources (Navajo Nation)
2 Hopi Tribe
2 Havasupai Tribe
1 Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (no funding support beginning Fiscal Year 1998)
1 Hualapai Tribe
2(4) Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe (2) continuous records and (4) crest-stage gages)
1 Tohono O'odham Nation
  Contact: Christopher Smith-Arizona, 520-670-6671 ext. 131, cfsmith@usgs.gov
1 Duck Valley Reservation (Western Shoshone & Paiute Tribes)
1 Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe
1 Summit Lake Paiute Tribe
2 Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California
6 Walker River Paiute Tribe
  Contact: Steve Hammond -Nevada, 702-887-7721, sehammon@usgs.gov
4 Yakama Indian Nation
2 Nisqually Indian Tribe
1 Quinault Indian Nation
1 Makah Tribe
1 Quileute Nation
1 Hoh Indian Tribe
4 Bureau of Indian Affairs (Spokane Reservation; Spokane Tribe)
  Contact: Thomas Zembzruski-Washington, 253-593-6510, tjzembrz@usgs.gov
6 Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (operated by the USGS office in Pasco, Washington)
11 Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation
1 Nez Perce Tribe
  Contact: Ed Hubbard-Oregon, 503-251-3239, leh@hubbard
1 Yurok Tribe
1 Hoopa Tribe
  Contact: Jim Bowers-California, 760-2247-1401, jcbowers@usg.gov

Ground-Water Monitoring Stations. The USGS operates the following ground-water monitoring stations:

Number
of Stations
Cooperator
6 Bureau of Indian Affairs & Peabody Coal Co. (Navajo and Hopi)
  Contact: Christopher Smith-Arizona, 520-670-6671 ext. 131, cfsmith@usgs.gov
25 Pechanga Band of Luiseño Mission Indians
  Contact: Rick Iwatsubo-California, 916-278-3025, ewatsu@usgs.gov

Water-Quality Monitoring Stations. The USGS operates the following water-quality monitoring stations:

Number
of Stations
Cooperator
2 Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe
  Contact: Christopher Smith-Arizona, 520-670-6671 ext. 131, cfsmith@usgs.gov
3 Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe
2 Walker River Paiute Tribe
  Contact: Steve Hammond -Nevada, 702-887-7721, sehammon@usgs.gov
3 Bureau of Indian Affairs (Spokane Reservation)
  Contact: Thomas Zembzruski-Washington, 253-593-6510, tjzembrz@usgs.gov

Sediment Monitoring Stations. The USGS operates the following sediment monitoring stations.

Number
of Stations
Cooperator
4 Hopi Tribe
  Contact: Julia Graf-Arizona, 520-670-6671 ext. 252, jbgraf@usgs.gov
2 Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe
  Contact: Thomas Zembzruski-Washington, 255-593-6510, tjzembrz@usgs.gov

The contacts provided in the report were accurate at the time of publication. Please refer to the USGS Employee Directory or the Office of Tribal Relations contact page if you require information about a specific activity.

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