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U.S. Geological Survey Manual

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK

408-2-H

December 1991

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1 - DEFINITIONS

CHAPTER 2 - ACQUISITION

  1. General
    1. Replacement Standards.
    2. Requisitioning
    3. Acquisition Document Review
  2. Acquiring Available and Excess Property.
    1. Excess Property Used for Trade-In.
    2. Excess Property for Use by Cooperators
    3. Excess Property for Cannibalization.
    4. Acquiring the Property.
  3. Fedstrips
  4. Prohibitions and restrictions

CHAPTER 3 - ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

  1. General
    1. Policy.
    2. Accountability Structure
    3. Custodianship
    4. Liability
    5. CPO Responsibilities
    6. Establishing Initial Property Record
    7. Form 9-065 (Property Receipt-Figure 3-1 and Instructions for Preparing)
    8. Affixing the Survey I.D. Number
    9. Summary
  2. Transfer of Accountability
    1. Inter-Bureau Transfers
    2. Signature
    3. CPO Separation or Transfer
    4. Employee Clearance
    5. Transfer Between CE's/Users
    6. Transfer to Non-USGS Entities
    7. WRD Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility Transfers
    8. Transfers of Available and Excess Property
    9. Form 9-064 (Property Transfer-Figure 3-2 and Instructions for Preparing)
    10. Condition Codes for Excess Property)
  3. Inventorying Property
    1. Annual Inventory
    2. APO Certification
  4. Temporary and Other Removal of Controlled and Other Property From USGS Facilities.
    1. Property Pass Procedures.
    2. Form DI-1934 (Property Pass-Figure 3-3 and Instructions for Preparing)
  5. Property Requiring Special Handling
    1. Common Use Property or Pooled Property
    2. Sensitive and Susceptible Property

CHAPTER 4 - DISPOSAL.

  1. General
  2. Authority
  3. Available/Excess Property
    1. Categories of Available/Excess
    2. CPO's Responsibilities.
    3. PMB, Regional SMO's, and the Supply Management Branch Responsibilities.
    4. Release of Excess
    5. Removal of Bureau Identification
    6. Standard Form 120 (Report of Excess Personal Property-Figure 4-1 and Instructions for Preparing)
    7. Available/Excess Items Not Disposed of By GSA..
    8. Abandonment or Destruction
  4. Cannibalization
  5. Exchange/Sale
    1. Trade-in
    2. Sale..
  6. Leased Equipment
  7. Foreign Disposals
  8. Disposal of Firearms
  9. Sale of Government Property to Federal Employees.
  10. Disposal of Special Protective Clothing and Equipment.
  11. Gifts Disposal.

CHAPTER 5 - REPORTS OF SURVEY AND CERTIFICATES OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY.

  1. General.
  2. Requirements for Report of Survey and Board of Survey Action
    1. When Required.
    2. When Not Required
  3. Conduct of a Board of Survey
    1. Standing Board of Survey.
    2. Traveling Survey Officer
    3. Special Boards of Survey
  4. Reports of Survey
    1. Preparation and Approval
    2. Form DI-103 (Report of Survey-Figure 5-1 and Instructions for Preparing)
  5. Board of Survey Procedures
    1. Investigations
    2. Findings
    3. Determination of Property Value
    4. Majority Rules
  6. Review of Board Findings
  7. Determination of Liability
    1. Negligence Determination
    2. Guidance
    3. Financial Liability Determination
    4. Employee Notification and Participation
    5. Appeal
  8. Financial Liability and Disciplinary Actions
  9. Billing the Employee.
  10. Certificates of Unserviceable Property
    1. Not to be Used
    2. When Used
    3. Procedures for Completing
    4. Form DI-103A (Certificate of Unserviceable Property-Figure 5-2 and Instructions for Preparing)
    5. Required Copies
    6. Approvals
    7. Reviews
    8. Completion Time
    9. Disposal Action
    10. Sale or Donation in Lieu of Abandonment and Destruction
    11. Sample Public Notice.
  11. Property Irregularities.
  12. Theft or Vandalism
  13. Witnessing Destruction or Reduction to Scrap
  14. Removal of Surveyed Property from Property Accountability Records
  15. Distribution of Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property
  16. Reports

CHAPTER 6 - MOTOR VEHICLES.

  1. General
  2. Definitions
  3. Motor Vehicle Acquisition
    1. Supply Sources
    2. Lease Versus Purchase Determination
    3. GSA Fleet Management System
    4. Purchases
    5. Commercial Leasing
  4. Motor Vehicle Accountability
    1. CPO Responsibility
    2. USGS Identification Number
    3. U.S. Government Identification
    4. Ownership Evidence
    5. Motor Vehicle Use and Storage
    6. Motor Vehicle Rental System
    7. Preventive Maintenance
    8. Negligence
    9. Utilization Standards..
    10. Quarterly Utilization Review
    11. Exemption from Utilization Criteria
  5. Vehicle Disposals.
    1. One-Time Repair Limit
    2. Replacement Standards
    3. Disposal Procedures
    4. Relief of Accountability.
  6. Reports
    1. Monthly Utilization Reporting
    2. Annual Motor Vehicle Forecast
    3. Schedule of Changes in Passenger Vehicle Fleet.
    4. Quality Deficiency Reports
  7. U.S. Government National Credit Card
    1. General.
    2. Delivery Ticket/Receipt.
    3. Self-Service Pumps.
    4. Loss of Credit Card.
    5. Replacement Credit Cards.
    6. Billing Account Code.
  8. Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Checklist

FIGURES

Figure 2-1 - Standard Form 122, Transfer Order

Excess Personal Property

Figure 3-1 - Form 9-065, Property Receipt and

Accountability Record

Figure 3-2 - Form 9-064, Property Transfer Request 3-9A

Figure 3-3 - Form DI-1934, Property Pass

Figure 4-1 - Standard Form 120, Report of Excess

Personal Property

Figure 4-2 - Standard Form 120-A, Continuation

Sheet (Report of Excess Personal

Property

Figure 5-1 - Form DI-103, Report of Survey

Figure 5-2 - Form DI-103A, Certificate of

Unserviceable Property

APPENDIXES

Appendix A Accountability Structure (by division)

Appendix B Listing of Accountable Property

(grouped by Federal Supply Code)

Appendix C Receipt for Property (Form DI-105)

Appendix D Inventory of Controlled Property (Form 9-067)

Appendix E Motor Vehicle Requisition - Delivery Order

(GSA Form l781)

Appendix F Usage Analysis Report

Appendix G Checklist for Vehicle Disposal (Form 9-3006)

Appendix H Checklist for Vehicle for Sale (Form 9-1947)

Appendix I Certificate to Obtain Title to a Vehicle (SF 97)


FOREWORD

This Property Management Handbook (408-2-H) supplements the Department of Interior (DOI) regulations and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Manual chapters on personal property management. Specifically, it provides a single source of basic information on acquisition, utilization, protection, transfer, inventory, and disposal of property. Its primary purpose is to assist management and users of Government property in the proper property management procedures.

All specific instances and situations incidental to the utilization and disposal of USGS property cannot be discussed in a handbook. This document is constructed to explain predictable situations; questions may still arise. If you cannot find your answers in these pages, you may contact the Administrative Division property office serving your organization:

Headquarters & Eastern Region Property Management Branch

210 National Center

Reston, VA 22092

FTS: 959-7324

Comm: (703) 648-7324

Western Region Supply Management Office

Mail Stop 224

345 Middlefield Road

Menlo Park, CA 94025

FTS: 459-5504

Comm: (415) 329-5504

Central Region Supply Management Office

Mail Stop 207

Box 25046

Denver, CO 80225

FTS: 776-5860

Comm: (303) 236-5860

Questions or suggestions regarding the content of this Property Management Handbook may be directed to the Property Management Officer, Office of Facilities and Management Services, 210 National Center, Reston, Virginia 22092. The Handbook for Property Custodians, dated May 1982, is superseded.

No information contained in the handbook is intended to alter any provisions of any Federal law, executive order, or departmental or USGS directive.

Date: December 1991

OVERVIEW

The U.S. Geological Survey's Property Management Database (PMDB) contains approximately 135,000 line items of accountable property in locations throughout the world, amounting to approximately $350 million based on acquisition value.

The term "personal property" means government-owned property of any kind, except land, buildings and appurtenances, and records of the Federal Government. Government personal property should not be confused with privately owned items. Controlled or accountable property is personal property which has an assigned USGS identification number and is tracked by our official centralized Property Management System (PMS). The terms "accountable property" and "controlled property" are used interchangeably in this document and throughout the bureau.

Federal law and departmental regulations specifically prohibit the use of any Government property for other than official purposes. Federal statutes also require that all controlled property be documented and charged to an accountable person upon receipt. That individual remains accountable for the property until it is formally transferred or disposed of in accordance with one of the methods outlined in this handbook.

Property records are established and maintained in the Property Management Database. These record the monetary investment in property and its location, as well as other identifying information. The PMDB is centralized and is maintained in the Headquarters Property Management Branch.

Unless otherwise specified, the terms "contractor inventory" and "contractor-held" as used in this handbook shall apply to Government property in the custody of contractors, grantees, cooperators, and concessionaires.

CHAPTER 1. DEFINITIONS

To facilitate the use of this handbook by those involved in the use and management of Government vehicles, vehicle definitions are contained in Chapter 6, Motor Vehicles.

Accountable Property Officer (APO) - The head of a USGS organizational unit having jurisdiction over property, who is responsible for the establishment and maintenance of property accountability records to provide for effective control of property assigned to the particular organizational element, as detailed in 410 DM 114-60.103(g).

Program guidance is provided to the APO by USGS Guidelines, Directives, and Handbooks.

The Departmental Manual, 410 DM 114-60.100(a), mandates that the APO for Government property in the custody of contractors, grantees, borrowers, concessionaires, and cooperators shall be the Contracting Officer, Grant Officer, or other management official administering the contract, grant, loan, or legal instrument which authorizes the custody of the Government property. In USGS the formally appointed APO shall serve as the APO for Government property in the custody of contractors, grantees, borrowers, concessionaires, and cooperators.

Accountable Property - Property for which detailed accountability or property control records are maintained in the Property Management Data Base (PMDB), and which may or may not be charged to an asset (general ledger control) account. Accountable property includes capitalized, non-capitalized, sensitive, contractor-held, and leased, and stores property with an original acquisition cost of $50 or more. Appendix A is a listing of non-expendable property items commonly used by the USGS indicating the classification of each group by a Federal Supply Code (FSC). Non-expendable property costing $50 or more will be processed as "accountable" even if not in any of the categories specifically listed in Appendix A, unless a formal and written request has been made through the Property Administrator (PA) and approved by the Property Management Officer (PMO). Sensitive non-expendable property (including firearms) shall be accountable regardless of the acquisition cost.

Acquire - To procure, purchase, or obtain in any manner, including transfer, acquisition from excess, lease, or loan for a period of 6 or more consecutive months, donation, forfeiture, manufacture, or production at Government-owned plants or facilities.

Acquisition Cost - The cost of purchased items, including any amounts paid for acquisition and related costs of obtaining the assets in their current form and place including transportation and installation. When acquisition involves trade-in or rental credits, the acquisition cost shall be the amount that the item would have cost if trade-in or rental credits were not applied. The acquisition cost of excess/available property shall be the value identified as the acquisition cost by the former owning agency/bureau.

Available Personal Property - Available personal property is property no longer required by the USGS and available for screening by other Interior Department bureaus and offices.

Board of Survey - A standing or ad hoc committee, generally appointed by senior management officials, typically consisting of three to five members serving a fixed term, and charged with the review or investigation of incidents involving loss, damage or destruction of Federal property; determination of financial liability for loss or damage of such property; and authorization for removal of items, if accountable, from official property records. Boards of Survey shall review and investigate above-cited incidents equally for accountable and non-accountable Government personal property.

Capitalized Property - Non-expendable property, the acquisition cost of which is $5,000 or more, which is charged to an asset (general ledger control) account in a finance office. Property acquired through lease or loan and museum property shall not be capitalized. Property shall become capitalized if the value of additions and enhancements when added to the already existing value generates a new value in excess of $4,999.99. All capitalized property must be accountable.

Controlled Property - See Accountable Property above.

Cognizant Employee (CE) - Employee designated by the Custodial Property Officer (CPO) who has physical custody or makes regular use of the equipment. CPO's shall be responsible for establishing and maintaining correct cognizant employee information in the PMDB.

Custodial Property Officer (CPO) - Supervisors, management officials, or others as designated in writing by the APO's; these are operating officials under whose daily control and supervision the property is located. The CPO's are responsible for accomplishing inventories, preparing and providing required documentation covering transfers, disposals, losses, thefts, and ensuring proper and official use of Government property, as well as maintaining internal tracking system of users within their jurisdictional areas. The USGS Manual, SM 408.2 , mandates that the Contacting Officer's Representative (COR) be the CPO for Government personal property in the custody of contractors, grantees, concessionaires, or other authorized non-Government entities.

Disposable Pay - That part of pay of any individual remaining after the deduction from earnings of any amounts required by law to be withheld.

Excess Personal Property - Excess personal property is property which is no longer required for use within the Interior Department and is then reported to GSA for reutilization within the Federal Government.

Exchange/Sale - Exchange/Sale property is property to be exchanged (traded-in) or sold pursuant to the exchange/sale authority in the Code of Federal Regulations, CFR 101-46, for a replacement that will continue performing essentially the same task.

Expendable Property -

(a) Property which is consumed, loses its identity or becomes an integral part of other property when put to use; or

(b) Property which, while not expendable as defined above, is considered administratively expendable because of its high rate of breakage in service, or because it has an acquisition cost of less than $50 and is not sensitive property; or

(c) Property which has an expected service life of less than 1 year

(e.g., materials and supplies).

Note: Museum property is not considered expendable.

Firearms - A weapon which is designed to expel a projectile or projectiles by the action of an explosive, and a muffler or silencer for the weapon.

FSC - Federal Stock Class - A four digit numeric code that is standard throughout the Federal government to identify classes or categories of property. It corresponds to the first four digits of the USGS property code.

Museum Property - An assemblage of museum objects collected according to some rational scheme and maintained so they can be preserved, studied, or interpreted for public benefit. Museum objects include prehistoric and historic objects, artifacts, works of art, archival documents, and natural history specimens that are a part of museum collections. Elements, fragments, and components of structures are objects, if they are no longer a part of the original structure. Museum property does not include those items necessary to display a collection such as exhibit cases, dioramas, special lighting, graphics, replicas, etc.

Negligence - Includes both simple and gross negligence. Simple negligence is the failure or omission to observe, for the protection of Government interests, that degree of care, precaution, and vigilance which the circumstances justly demand, whereby the Government suffers through loss, damage, or destruction of property. Gross negligence is an act or omission of the employee(s) which constitutes misconduct, willful negligence, or a wanton and reckless disregard for the property.

Non-Accountable - See Non-Controlled below.

Non-Capitalized Property - Includes non-expendable Government personal property with an acquisition cost below $5,000 and all expendable Government personal property. However, this term does not apply to any museum property.

Non-Controlled - Non-controlled is property which is not maintained in the PMDB. It includes expendable and/or consumable property, as well as non-expendable personal property having an expected service life of less than one year, losing its identity as an internal component of another item, being stocked as a spare or replacement part for another item, or having an acquisition value of less that $50. In addition, "non-controlled" includes those items where a formal written request for such status has been made through the Property Administrator (PA) and approved by the Property Management Officer (PMO), or where a departmental or bureau determination has been made not to control certain items or categories of property. NOTE: Federal law and Federal, departmental, and bureau regulations regarding use, misuse, and disposal of Government personal property apply to non-controlled property.

Non-Expendable Property - Property which has a continuing use, is not consumed in use, does not lose its identity as an internal component of another item, and is of durable nature with an expected service life of one or more years, and has an acquisition cost of $50 or more. All museum property is generally considered non-expendable regardless of acquisition cost.

Non-reportable - Non-reportable excess and surplus property is property which does not meet the criteria for mandatory excess reporting as prescribed in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR's), but for which reutilization screening is economically justified based on useful life, significant salvage value, or a known need. Both controlled and non-controlled property that falls in this category will be screened as available property and may be reported as excess.

NSN - National Stock Number - A 13-digit stock number that is standard throughout the Federal Government and is assigned to each item carried in the GSA stock program. The first 4 digits of the NSN are also known as the Federal Stock Class (FSC) and correspond to the first 4 digits of the USGS property code.

Personal Property - Government-owned property of any kind or an interest therein, except (1) real property (land, buildings, and appurtenances), and (2) records of the Federal Government. Specifically, personal property includes all equipment, materials and supplies, and museum items which include antiques, artifacts, natural history specimens, and other items of museum collections. It does not include property which is incorporated in, or permanently affixed to, real property. Government personal property should not be confused with privately owned items.

Personal Property Management - A process and system for controlling the acquisition, receipt, storage, issue, utilization, maintenance, protection, accountability, and disposal of personal property to best satisfy the program needs of the USGS.

Property Accountability - The obligation of the APO, who is designated to establish and maintain adequate detailed property accountability records and safeguards to ensure effective control over property under his/her administrative jurisdiction. This obligation may not be delegated to other employees, although the record-keeping function, and responsibility for the use, care, and safekeeping of this property may be assigned to others.

Property Administrator (PA) - Officials appointed by the Director (one in each division) with overall responsibility for the total property management program for their respective accountability areas.

Property Code - A 7-digit number assigned to categories of property in the Property Management Data Base (PMDB). The first 4 digits of the property code correspond to the Federal Stock Class (FSC) and to the first 4 digits of the National Stock Number (NSN).

Property Management Officer - The individual responsible for the overall administration, coordination, and control of the USGS personal property management program.

Property Management Record Keeping System (PMS) - The entire body of procedures and processes, both manual and automated, to maintain records on the acquisition, custodianship, and disposition of each item of USGS accountable property. All requisitioners, users, storers, Cognizant Employees (CE's), Custodial Property Officers (CPO's), and Accountable Property Officers (APO's), as well as the staff of the Property Management Branch, along with data processing, procurement, financial management, and warehousing personnel have responsibilities that are essential to maintain the accuracy and integrity of the PMS.

Property Management Data Base (PMDB) - The Property Management Data Base (PMDB), maintained by the Property Management Branch at bureau headquarters, contains the individual records of each item of USGS accountable property.

Quasi-expendable - Non-controlled property stocked by warehouses at headquarters and at the regional centers for issue on a reimbursable basis for field and office use.

Reportable - Reportable property is property which by law must be reported excess based on value and condition criteria set forth in CFR 101-43.

Reviewing Authority - Management officials who provide technical and procedural guidance to Boards of Survey. The Reviewing Authority (RA) must review and may approve the findings of a Board of Survey. A Reviewing Authority may not disapprove a Report of Survey, but if he/she disagrees with the findings, will follow the procedures set forth in Chapter 5 of this handbook and 410 DM 114-60.8. The Headquarters Property Management Officer (PMO) and Regional Supply Management Officers (SMO's) are designated Reviewing Authority for Certificates of Unserviceable Property. The Chief, Office of Facilities and Management Services (OFMS) and the Regional Management Officers (RMO's) are designated RA's for Reports of Survey processed through their respective Boards of Survey.

Sensitive Property - Sensitive property is property with a high probability of theft or misuse or susceptibility to pilferage, theft, or misappropriation as determined by the PMO. Sensitive property shall always include all firearms and ammunition and may include additional items from time to time as deemed appropriate by the PMO. Sensitive non-expendable property (firearms) shall be controlled irrespective of acquisition cost.

Surplus Personal Property - Surplus property is property which is not required for use within the Federal Government or for which Federal screening is not required, and which is then processed for donation and/or sale to non-Federal parties.

Survey Identification Number (SID) - The 7-character alpha-numeric identifier unique to each individual item of accountable property. The SID is the primary key to access all information in the PMDB concerning any item of accountable property.

CHAPTER 2. ACQUISITION

1. General. The most common method of acquiring property is by a procurement action (purchase order, delivery order, contract, grant, or cooperative agreement). A purchase can be initiated in a variety of ways, using a variety of forms. Various methods of acquisition will be covered in this chapter.

A. Replacement Standards. 41 CFR 100-25.4 prescribes minimum replacement standards for replacing motor vehicles, office machines, furniture, and materials handling equipment. However, USGS will retain items which are in usable workable condition even though the standards permit replacement, provided the item(s) can continue to be used or operated without excessive maintenance cost or substantial reduction in trade-in value.

B. Requisitioning. Requisitions for procurement actions at Headquarters or at the Denver and Menlo Park regional centers are processed by the respective Administrative Division procurement activity. For field offices which are not serviced by either of these procurement activities, purchases are accomplished in accordance with division and locally established procedures.

C. Acquisition Document Review. The Property Management Office at Headquarters and the Regional Supply Management Offices (Denver and Menlo Park) must screen your requisitions if you are located in one of the major centers (Reston, Denver, or Menlo Park). Requisitions are reviewed for controlled (capitalized and non-capitalized) property, including value changes and enhancements, for the correct object classification code for controlled (capitalized and non-capitalized) items, for the identification of the CPO, for the availability of a like item from available and excess property, and for any required approvals (ADP, copiers, etc.).

The following categories of requisitions are exempt from property screening :

- Subscriptions, reprints, publications, and translations.

- Relocations of personnel.

- Temporary exhibit/meeting/conference facilities.

- Court and hearing recorders/interpreters/translators.

- Laundry services for laboratory and special clothing.

- Inks, films, and chemicals (including cylinder refills/exchanges).

- Repair and maintenance services. NOTE: Equipment modifications and enhancements are not exempt. Requisitions for repair and/or replacement parts to be held by a USGS activity (as opposed to those directly tendered to persons performing repairs) are also not exempt.

- Requisitions for services, or service contracts, that obviously do not involve property, i.e., grounds maintenance, custodial, etc.

The same review criteria applies to requisitions for amendments and modifications to existing orders.

All requisitions processed by the Reston, Denver, or Menlo Park procurement offices for rentals and leases, including renewal; all requisitions for ADP/Telecommunications; and all requisitions for supplies and materials, except for exemptions specifically stated above, must be screened by the Property Management Branch or the Regional Supply Management Offices.

It is imperative that the Property Control Copy of all acquisition documents issued at field offices, including purchase orders, delivery orders and Fedstrips, as well as all amendments and modifications, be sent directly to the Property Management Branch, 210 National Center, Reston, Virginia, by the issuing office. Do not mail Property Management's copies to either the Office of Financial Management or to the Office of Procurement and Contracts along with copies required by those offices. The Property Control Copy of all acquisition documents (including contracts, grants and cooperative agreements) issued at either headquarters or the regional procurement offices must be sent directly to the respective headquarters or regional property office.

Regardless of the procedure followed or the form used, there is important information critical to property accountability and control which must be included on the initiating document, as follows:

(1) Item Description. The Item Description must be clear and complete. Do not use ambiguous terminology, acronyms, or only numeric codes; do include the manufacturer's name, the model number, serial number (if known), and other identifying data.

(2) Object Class. Different kinds of items are grouped by Object Class and assigned an Object Class code for accounting purposes. Experience has shown that errors are sometimes made in this area which, in turn, result in delays or errors in important financial records. To avoid these complications, an Object Class code must be accurately included on the form. Especially of concern to Property Management are the object classes for capitalized and non-capitalized controlled items. A listing of Object Class codes is contained in Survey Manual Chapter 330.3.1.

(3) Custodial Property Officer (CPO). The CPO (see SM 408.2) must be named on the form, either typed in the body of the form, or inserted in the space labeled "Accountable Employee." Include this information even if the CPO and consignee are the same individual. CPO's have been appointed in writing for all divisions. If you are in doubt as to your CPO, check with your administrative officer or contact the Headquarters Property Management Branch. If a name other than that of a valid CPO is provided, the item will not be charged to that employee, but will be changed to the correct CPO by the Property staff.

(4) Enhancement or Upgrades. Acquisition documents must explicitly state when items are enhancements to existing accountable property, and identify the Survey Identification Number of item(s) affected. The value of enhancements or betterments must be reflected in the official property records. A statement must be added to the acquisition document, such as "DO NOT CONTROL SEPARATELY; this is an enhancement and will become a component of (describe item, include SID)."

(5) Replacement Parts. The documents must also state when items are replacement parts. Replacement parts are not numbered, and their value is not reflected in the official property and/or financial records, and should be identified by a statement, such as "DO NOT CONTROL SEPARATELY; item is a replacement part."

(6) Enhancement vs. Replacement Parts. It is important to differentiate between enhancements (betterments) and replacement parts. A replacement merely serves to repair or keep in operation a given piece of equipment. An enhancement (add-on) enhances the value or adds more capability to a given piece of equipment, and this added value must then be reflected in the bureau property and financial records.

(7) Leased/Rented Equipment. Leased and rented property (with a term of 6 months or more) is considered accountable property and is numbered and recorded in the property database. This property is identified as "leased" in the property database; this will be reflected on inventory listings. For lease renewals, the existing SID number should be retained. To prevent the assignment of duplicate SID's, all orders for the renewal of leases/rentals must reference the original acquisition document or indicate the existing SID number. Additionally, it is helpful to have equipment lease renewals distinguished from maintenance and other services.

(8) Non-USGS Funds. If funds from other than USGS are being used to purchase the item(s), a statement should be provided on the acquisition document; the document should also state any extenuating circumstances under which the property should not carry a Survey I.D. number, i.e., property where title is vested in other than USGS by virtue of a contract, etc.

(9) Approvals. Departmental and bureau required approvals must be reflected on or accompany the initiating document.

2. Acquiring Available and Excess Property. Available property is property that is owned by a DOI activity which no longer needs it. It is available to other DOI activities prior to becoming excess. Excess property is property that is no longer required by a Federal entity. It may be comprised of new, reconditioned, used, or scrap items.

It is departmental and Federal Government policy and good business practice to use any available and excess property as the first source of supply. The cost of acquiring a good, serviceable, or repairable item through excess can be considerably less than buying new. In most instances, the only charge you pay is for handling and transportation.

When personal property is no longer needed, it should be reported promptly to the appropriate property office (Headquarters, Denver, or Menlo Park), or transferred to the Reston, Denver, or Menlo Park warehouse, as such property may be suitable for use within another USGS office.

The governmentwide excess property program is administered by the General Services Administration (GSA). GSA periodically publishes regional excess property catalogs and bulletins, and offices may screen available excess property through GSA's MUFFIN online inquiry system. For more information or instructions on MUFFIN, call FTS/COM (202) 557-7970, or contact your local FSS Customer Service Director. Requirements can also be submitted by telephone, letter, or by GSA Form 1539. USGS offices should contact the nearest GSA Federal Supply Service office for additional information on excess property. The first step in acquiring an item through the GSA excess process is to contact the staff at the GSA Federal Supply Service office serving your location and place a "freeze" on the item. Requests for excess property are generally honored on a first-come, first-serve basis. In the event of competing requests, consideration is given to national defense requirements, emergency needs, equitable distribution, transportation costs, and avoidance of new procurement. The "freeze" holds the item in your name for up to 10 days. If you have not placed your order by that time, the item may be issued to another. Paragraph D below describes the procedures for acquiring the property once you have placed a "freeze" on the item.

Do not freeze property unless you have a definite need for it and you seriously intend to acquire it. If you freeze an item and cannot acquire it, call GSA as soon as possible to release the hold.

Once an item is frozen, it is advisable to physically inspect it, if possible. Free property is worth nothing if it does not serve your purposes; note particularly the Description and Property Condition Code shown in the catalog.

A. Excess Property Used for Trade-In. Property may not be acquired through the excess property program for use as a trade-in or for exchange. Once acquired from excess, an item must be held for a minimum of one full year before it can be traded-in or exchanged. This restriction does not apply to available property transferred from other Department of the Interior activities.

B. Excess Property for Use by Cooperators. Excess property may be obtained for the purpose of furnishing such property to recipients under grants and cooperative agreements, as defined in FPMR 101-43.001-5, made in accordance with the Federal Grant and Cooperative Agreement Act of 1977 (31 U.S.C. 6301). This regulation does not allow agencies to enter into cooperative agreements for the purpose of providing excess property.

C. Excess Property for Cannibalization. Available and excess property may be acquired for parts or components. If you know in advance that you intend to use available or excess items you are acquiring for parts or components, please note this on the order document so that those items will not be recorded as controlled or capitalized.

D. Acquiring the Property. The acquisition of excess property is accomplished by executing a Transfer Order, Excess Personal Property, Standard Form 122 (SF 122).

The SF 122 must be approved by the Headquarters Property Office for Eastern Region and Headquarters acquisitions, and by the Regional Supply Management Officers for Central and Western regional states. Generally at least five copies of the SF 122 are required; however, this may vary by region. Consult your area Property or Supply Management Office if in doubt.

When acquiring ADP equipment, the property offices will forward the SF 122 to the Information Systems Division for clearance and approval. To avoid delays, any documentation, information, or justifications specified in ISD's "Guidelines for the Acquisition of Automated Data Processing Resources," should be annotated on or attached to the SF 122.

(1) Follow-up and Payment. If the consignee does not receive the excess property within a reasonable time, he/she should contact the Property Management Office that processed the SF 122 for follow-up action. All invoices should be annotated with the SF 122 order number and/or attached to a photocopy of the approved SF 122 and should be sent immediately to the Office of Financial Management, MS 270, Reston, Virginia 22092.

(2) Standard Form 122. The following illustrates the Transfer Order, Excess Personal Property, SF 122, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING SF 122

1. Leave blank.

2. Enter current date.

3. Enter the complete address of the GSA Regional Office that published the catalog from which the order is placed.

4. Leave blank. The appropriate Regional Supply Management Office or the headquarters Property Management Branch will complete.

5. Enter the name and address of the organization that currently controls the property being ordered, as shown in the excess property catalog.

6. Enter the name of the consignee (the person to whom the item is to be shipped), and the consignee's address.

7. Enter the current location (complete address) of the property as shown in the excess property catalog. If the property is in more than one location, prepare a separate transfer order for each.

8. Indicate appropriate instructions. Annotate "Will Pick Up" and add a contact with telephone number for the holding agency to notify regarding when items are to be picked up.

9. Leave blank. The appropriate regional Supply Management Office or headquarters Property Management Branch will complete.

10. Enter the financial account number to be charged (primarily for the holding agency to use for packing and shipping).

11. Leave blank.

12. Normally, leave blank. The holding agency will arrange for transportation and billing. A GBL may be attached to the SF 122 and the GBL number annotated in this block; however, it is often easier for the shipper to prepare these documents.

13. a. Enter the information about the item(s) being ordered from the excess catalog.

b. NOTE: FOR ACCOUNTABLE PROPERTY, THE NAME OF THE CUSTODIAL PROPERTY OFFICER MUST BE INCLUDED ON THE SF 122 IN BLOCK 13c.

c. The following certification as mandated in the Code of Federal Regulations, 41 CFR 114-43.301-50, must be annotated and signed in block 13c.:

This is to certify that the condition, plus all costs involved have been considered, and this transfer action is practical and economical in accordance with Title 41 CFR 114-43.301-50.

___________________________________ _

CPO's Signature and date

d. If items have been frozen, state the date and the name of the individual at GSA with whom the freeze had been placed in block 13c.

e. Any ADP approvals required in accordance with the Information Systems Division's "Guidelines for the Acquisition of Automated Data Processing Resources" or other applicable regulations must be annotated in block 13c if space permits. Otherwise, attach a separate sheet.

f. If the holding agency is expected to issue a GBL, annotate the following in block 13c.:

If GBL is issued, send memo (obligating) and original (billing) copy to:

U.S. Geological Survey

Office of Financial Management

270 National Center

Reston, VA 22092

g. If items are intended to be used for parts or components, provide this information in block 13c.

(3) Screening unreported property. Although there is no formal mechanism for screening property that has not been reported to GSA, such property can still be acquired. The procedure is the same as detailed in (3) above except that the SF 122 should be annotated with the statement that property was not reported to GSA so the Property Management Branch or appropriate regional supply management office will know to work with the holding agency directly.

3. Fedstrips. Controlled property may be ordered from GSA stock using Fedstrip forms and procedures. The property copy of Fedstrip forms containing controlled property must be annotated with all of the required property accountability information including CPO. If electronic ordering procedures are used for Fedstrip orders, a hard copy listing controlled property line items must be typed and sent to the Property Management Branch or the appropriate regional supply management office.

4. Prohibitions and restrictions. Controlled property, non-capitalized as well as capitalized, may never be purchased by means of oral, blanket, or bankcard ordering procedures or from imprest funds except in extreme emergencies. A copy of the invoice or packing slip or comparable paperwork with all of the required property accountability information (including but not limited to CPO and appropriate property description with manufacturer and model number) must be sent to the Property Management Branch or the Regional Supply Management Office attached to a statement thoroughly explaining the nature of the emergency. Abuse of oral, blanket, bankcard, or imprest fund purchasing to acquire controlled property will be brought to the attention of the Office of Procurement and Contracts.

CHAPTER 3. ACCOUNTABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY

1. General.

A. Policy. Accountability, control, and responsibility for all government-owned or leased personal property must be maintained from the time of receipt until disposal. It is essential that each designated accountable official establish procedures to ensure that necessary documentation is maintained reflecting the location and user's name.

B. Accountability structure. The USGS has three formally designated levels of personal property accountability (SM 408.2); see Appendix B:

(1) Property Administrators

(2) Accountable Property Officers

(3) Custodial Property Officers

Additionally, all users of property are termed "Cognizant Employees," and while not in the formal accountability chain, are responsible for the proper care, use, safeguard, and return of Government-owned property and for promptly reporting any loss or damage.

C. Custodianship. Once property is received, CPO's must ensure that the property is used effectively and is properly accounted for, cared for, and safeguarded during its lifetime.

D. Liability. An employee having custody and use of USGS property may be held financially liable for its loss or damage if such loss or damage results from negligence.

E. CPO Responsibilities. The CPO assumes certain responsibilities which pertain to all items of controlled property:

(1) To ensure that all items are numbered with the unique USGS I.D. number; the number and decal for marking will be provided by the Property Management Branch.

(2) To maintain up-to-date records on acquisitions, movements and disposals within his/her jurisdictional area.

(3) To complete a "Property Receipt and Accountability Record" upon receipt of a new controlled item. This document must be completed and returned to the Headquarters Property Management Branch, 210 National Center, Reston, Virginia 22092, within 30 days of receipt of a new item.

F. Establishing Initial Property Record. Once the acquisition documents have been processed, and the order placed, regardless of the source, certain very important steps must be followed to ensure that all controlled property is correctly and completely entered into the Property Management System Database (PMDB). The primary document is the computer generated "Property Receipt and Accountability Record," Form 9-065.

G. Form 9-065. The following illustrates the USGS Property Receipt and Accountability Record, Form 9-065, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTION FOR COMPLETING THE PROPERTY RECEIPT AND ACCOUNTABILITY RECORD

THIS FORM MUST BE COMPLETED AND RETURNED TO THE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BRANCH WITHIN 30 DAYS OF RECEIPT OF THE PROPERTY.

1. If the item should not have been separately numbered and controlled, write full explanation on the form or on an accompanying memorandum and return the form (unsigned) to the Property Management Branch, 210 National Center, Reston, Virginia 22092.

2. Verify the item description, model number, manufacturer, etc. Be sure all information is accurate; make any needed changes in ink on the form.

3. Enter the manufacturer's name and the manufacturer's serial number on both copies of the form.

4. Enter the date the property was received on both copies.

5. Sign both copies of the form, return one copy to the Property Management Branch, 210 National Center, Reston, Virginia 22092. One copy should be retained for your records.

6. It is permissible for one person to sign for another only if there is no change in the CPO originally annotated on the form. When signing for another individual, be sure to annotate "FOR" after your signature and above the preprinted name.

7. If the CPO on the computer generated form is wrong, line through the wrong name and PRINT the correct one. The correct CPO then must personally sign any form altered in this manner.

8. The Property Management Branch will complete the record.

NOTE: THE FORM WILL BE RETURNED TO YOU BY THE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT BRANCH IF YOU FAIL EITHER TO FURNISH THE MANUFACTURER'S SERIAL NUMBER OR TO STATE "NONE" WHERE APPLICABLE OR IF THE SIGNATURE IS NOT THAT OF THE CPO UNLESS "FOR" IS ANNOTATED!

H. Affixing the Survey I.D. Number. The assigned USGS I.D. number (from the "Property Receipt and Accountability Record") and the manufacturer's serial number must be recorded on the decal provided by the property office. The decal should be placed on the equipment item in a prominent, clearly visible location immediately upon receipt of the property, but in no event later than 30 days after receipt.

Other appropriate methods of numbering the item may be used, such as engraving the number directly onto it. It is of utmost importance that the number be legible, as permanent as possible, and as prominently displayed as feasible.

I. Summary. In summary, when a new item is received, the CPO must verify all pertinent information on the "Property Receipt and Accountability Record," make any needed changes, provide the required additional information, affix the decal containing the Survey I.D. number and manufacturer serial number, and return one completed, signed copy of the form to the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia.

2. Transfer of Accountability

A. Inter-Bureau Transfers. Transfer requests to acquire personal property will be initiated only for property that is essential for accomplishing the mission of the acquiring office. Property (controlled or non-controlled) that is no longer needed will be returned promptly to the servicing warehouse, or reported through the appropriate headquarters or regional office following the excess procedures detailed in Chapter 4. A Property Transfer Request (Form 9-064) is used to transfer accountable property between CPO's or between CPO's and warehouses as follows:

(1) Transfer between CPO's and between USGS warehouses. The CPO or warehouse employee transferring the property completes a Property Transfer Request (Form 9-064). THE TRANSFEROR (CPO) IS RESPONSIBLE FOR OBTAINING THE SIGNATURE OF THE TRANSFEREE (CPO) IN ORDER TO CLEAR HIS/HER ACCOUNTABILITY RECORD. This procedure also applies to non-controlled non-reimbursable property transfers involving warehouses (including all furniture), but does not apply to the requisition of Quasi-expendable, store stock, and reimbursable non-controlled warehouse stock items: The Form 9-064 is processed as follows:

(a) Property Control Copies (Original and Yellow). Forward to the Property Management Branch, MS 210, Reston, VA, after signature by both the transferor and transferee in the appropriate blocks. After the transfer has been effected in the property database, the yellow copy will be noted by the Property Management Branch, and returned to the transferor.

(b) Transferee's Copy (Pink). Retained by the transferee (the CPO to whom the property is transferred). It is important that the transferee retain this copy -- he/she is not relieved of accountability until the Property Management Branch receives the original, signed by both parties.

(c) Transferor's Copy (Orange). Retained by the transferor (the CPO relinquishing accountability).

(d) Accounting Copy (Green). For warehouse use.

(e) Employee's Suspense Copy (Salmon). Retained by transferor until a signed copy is received.

(2) Returns or Transfers to USGS Warehouses.

(a) Employee's Suspense Copy (Salmon). ALWAYS OBTAIN A SIGNATURE OF THE WAREHOUSE REPRESENTATIVE WHEN THE PROPERTY IS PICKED UP; THIS IS PROOF THAT THE PROPERTY WAS PHYSICALLY REMOVED. Keep the suspense copy after obtaining the signature.

(b) Original and all other copies. Send to the warehouse with the property.

The original of the 9-064 and the Property Control carbon copy (yellow) are receipted at the warehouse and sent to the Property Management Branch; the warehouse retains the transferee's copy. The Property Management Branch adjusts the records to transfer accountability to the appropriate warehouse account, files the original document in the warehouse file, and notes and returns the yellow Property Control copy to the CPO (transferor).

B. Signature. Property Transfer Requests (Form 9-064) must be signed by both the transferor (the current CPO) and the transferee (the CPO accepting accountability). In cases where it is impossible for the transferor or the transferee to sign, an agent, with appropriate delegated authority from the CPO, may accept accountability "for" the transferee.

C. CPO Separation or Transfer. Prior to separation or transfer, outgoing CPO's will conduct a physical inventory of the property for which they are accountable. The appropriate APO will appoint the new CPO in writing and transmit a copy of such appointment through the respective division PA to the PMO. The written designation will authorize the addition of the new CPO to the PMDB. The incoming CPO is required to formally accept, in writing, full accountability and responsibility for all accountable property by using the Form 9-064. In the event the incoming CPO is not available at the time of the outgoing CPO's departure, property will be transferred to the APO or an interim/acting CPO via a Form 9-064. The Form 9-064 should contain a statement indicating that this is an interim transfer pending appointment of the permanent CPO.

D. Employee Clearance.

(1) Employee Clearance Report. APO's must ensure that all separating employees complete and process an Employee Clearance Report (Form 9-090) in accordance with SM 344.16.1. This is the primary mechanism for ensuring that the property account is cleared prior to separation. In cases where items charged to the separating employee are missing or damaged, a Report of Survey needs to be completed and processed at least two weeks in advance of his/her departure to ensure timely processing. Items that are in a separating employee's custody, and being used by him/her, must be transferred to an eligible transferee prior to separation.

The Employee Clearance Report will be screened through the Headquarters Property Management Branch. If the PMDB reflects that a CE/user is still charged with property, a temporary hold will be placed on any monies due the employee. Property Management will simultaneously notify the Payroll Office and the CE's division PA (or delegee) of the temporary hold. It will be the responsibility of that respective division to follow up with the appropriate CPO and subsequently notify Payroll when the Property account has been cleared and monies may be released. Separating CPO's must transfer their property to another formally appointed CPO prior to clearance; final monies will be held pending such transfer.

(2) Inventory Requirements. Upon separation, transfer, or reassignment of any employee, a physical inventory shall be taken of all property in the employee's custody. The inventory and clearance of the employee's property record will be handled through his/her CPO.

E. Transfer Between CE's/Users. Transfers of property between cognizant employees (CE's)/users are handled internally within the CPO jurisdictional area. The CPO should require all CE's/users to sign for their property, either by use of a sign-out log, or by obtaining the user's signature on the system-generated listing of the property. It is recommended that short-term/temporary loans be documented using the Receipt for Property, Form DI-105, Appendix C.

F. Transfers to Non-USGS Entities. Property shall not be loaned, transferred, or "given" to non-USGS entities unless specific authority exists to do so, and then only within the scope, purpose, and limitations as stated in the authority. Such authority may exist when the use of USGS-owned property has been authorized within the written terms and conditions of a legally executed contract, grant, cooperative, agreement, purchase order, or memorandum of understanding. The contracting/grants officer, or other authorized official for that legal instrument, is the only official who can authorize the provision, acquisition, reimbursement, utilization or disposal of any Government property so involved.

G. Water Resources Division Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) Transfers. Controlled property is shipped from the HIF in response to a computer-generated property transfer (HIF order) instead of a 9-064. When an order for controlled property is shipped from the HIF, it will include a copy of the Equipment Order with the Survey Identification Number (W number) and the CPO's name. The accountable CPO will sign and return the form directly to the Property Management Branch, MS 210, Reston, Virginia 22092. Property Management will make the appropriate transfer or assignment of accountability in the PMDB, note the document, and return a noted copy to the HIF for its records.

H. Transfers of Available and Excess Property.

(1) Controlled/accountable property, furniture, and ADPE in any condition, and all reportable property (whether or not controlled) which is no longer required by the CPO and which is located in Washington, D.C. (including Reston), Denver, San Francisco Bay (including Menlo Park), Rolla, Stennis Space Center, and Flagstaff greater metropolitan areas, as well as any other property which can be economically transferred to one of the USGS warehouses, will be promptly turned in to the appropriate USGS warehouse to obtain optimal reutilization.

(2) The USGS maintains warehouses at the following locations:

(a) Washington, DC Metropolitan Area - Warehouse 1

302 Victory Drive

Herndon, VA 22070

Contact: Chief, Branch of Materials Management

U.S. Geological Survey

Mail Stop 231 National Center

12201 Sunrise Valley Drive

Reston, VA 22092

Telephone: (703) 648-7274; FTS 959-7274

(b) Denver, CO Metropolitan Area - Warehouse 2

Building 25

Denver Federal Center

Lakewood, CO 80225-0046

Contact: Supply Management Officer, Central

Region

U.S. Geological Survey

Mail Stop 207, Building 25

Box 25046 Denver Federal Center

Lakewood, CO 80225-0046

Telephone: (303) 236-5860; FTS 776-5860

(c) San Francisco Bay, CA Metropolitan Area - Warehouse 5

1020 O'Brien Drive

Menlo Park, CA 94025

Contact: Supply Management Officer

U.S. Geological Survey

Mail Stop 224

1020 O'Brien Drive

Menlo Park, CA 94025

Telephone: (415) 853-5508; FTS 459-5508

(d) Rolla, MO Metropolitan Area - Warehouse 6

1900 Iowa Street

Rolla, MO 65401

Contact: Administrative Officer, Mid-Continent

Mapping Center

U.S. Geological Survey

Mail Stop 306

1400 Independence Road

Rolla, MO 65401

Telephone: (314) 341-0890; FTS 277-0890

(e) Stennis Space Center, MS - Warehouse 7

Building 2101

Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center

Stennis Space Center, MS 39529

Contact: Chief, Field Service and Supply Section

Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility

U.S. Geological Survey

Building 2101

Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center

Stennis Space Center, MS 39529

Telephone: (601) 688-2161 Ext. 2108; FTS 494-2108

(f) Flagstaff, AZ Metropolitan Area - Warehouse 8

2255 North Gemini Drive

Flagstaff, AZ 86001

Contact: Facilities Manager

Flagstaff Field Center

U.S. Geological Survey

2255 North Gemini Drive

Flagstaff, AZ 86001

Telephone: (602) 527-7230; FTS 765-7230

(3) Transfer documents and inquiries shall be addressed to the contacts at the mailing addresses listed above.

I. Form 9-064. The following illustrates the Property Transfer Request (Form 9-064) and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING PROPERTY TRANSFER REQUEST (FORM 9-064)

(1) Complete only if transferring property into or out of warehouses.

(2) Name, office address, phone and room numbers of CPO transferring the item(s).

(3) Name, office, address, phone and room numbers of CPO receiving the item(s).

(4) Optional use of transferor/requestor.

(5) For warehouse use.

(6) Account to be charged, if applicable.

(7) Sequential number of items (1, 2, 3, etc.).

(8) Survey I.D. Number, or stock number.

(9) Description of item; include model and manufacturer.

(10) Manufacturer's serial number.

(11) For warehouse use.

(12) Check appropriate block.

(13) If transferring as excess to warehouse, indicate condition (listing of Condition Codes follows). Also provide detailed information as to the condition in the body of the form.

(14) Signature of transferor CPO/APO and date.

(15) For warehouse use.

(16) Signature of transferee CPO/APO and date.

J. Condition Codes for Excess Personal Property (FPMR 101-43).

Condition

Code

Brief

Definition

Expanded Definition

1

New - Excellent

New or unused property in excel-

lent condition. Ready for use and

identical or interchangeable with

new items delivered by a manufac-

turer or normal source of supply.

New - Good

New or unused property in good

condition. Slightly shopworn, soiled, or similar, but condition

does not impair utility.

2

New - Fair

New or unused property in fair

condition. Soiled, shopworn,

rusted, deteriorated, or damaged

to the extent that utility is slightly impaired.

3

New - Poor

New or unused property, soiled,

rusted, mildewed, deteriorated, or

damaged, condition is poor still

having some utility, but cannot be

classed as salvage.

4

Used/Reconditioned

Excellent

Used property, but repaired or

renovated and in excellent condi-

tion.

Used/Reconditioned

Good

Used property which has been repaired or renovated and, while still in good usable condition, has become worn from further use and cannot qualify for excellent condition.

Used/Usable Without

Repairs - Excellent

Property which has been slightly or moderately used, no repairs required, and still in excellent condition.

Used/Usable Without

Repairs - Good

Used property. In good condition with considerable use left before any important repairs would be required.

Condition

Code

Brief

Definition

Expanded Definition

5

Used/Reconditioned

Fair

Used property which has been repaired or renovated but has deteriorated since reconditioning and is only in fair condition. Further repairs or renovation required or expected to be needed in near future.

Used/Usable Without

Repairs - Fair

Used property which is still in fair condition and useable without repairs; however, somewhat deter-

iorated, with some parts (or por-

tion) worn and should be replaced.

6

Used/Reconditioned

Poor

Used property, which has been repaired or renovated and is in poor condition from serious deter-

ioration such as from major wear and tear, corrosion, exposure to weather, or mildew.

Used/Usable Without

Repairs - Poor

Used property which is still usable without repairs but in poor condition and undependable or uneconomical in use. Parts badly worn and deteriorated.

7

Used/Repairs

Required - Excellent

Used property, still in excellent condition, but minor repairs required. (Estimated repairs would cost no more than 10% of acquisi-

tion cost.)

Used/Repairs

Required - Good

Used property, in good condition but considerable repairs required. Estimated cost of repairs would be from 11% to 25% of acquisition cost.

8

Used/Repairs

Required - Fair

Used property, in fair condition but extensive repairs required. Estimated repair costs would be from 26% to 40% of acquisition cost.Condition

Code

Brief

Definition

Expanded Definition

9

Used/Repairs

Required - Poor

Used property, in poor condition and requiring major repairs. Badly worn, and would still be in doubt-

ful condition of dependability and uneconomical in use if repaired. Estimated repair costs between 41% to 65% of acquisition cost.

X

Salvage

Salvage, property that has some value in excess of its basic material content but which is in such condition that it has no rea- sonable prospect of use for any purpose as a unit (either by the holding or any other Federal agency) and its repair or rehabil-

itation for use as a unit (either by the holding or any other Federal agency) is clearly impracticable. Repairs or rehabilitation estimat-

ed to cost in excess of 65% of acquisition cost would be considered clearly impracticable for purposes of this definition.

S

Scrap

Material that has no value except for its basic material content.

3. Inventorying Property.

A. Annual Inventory. On an annual basis, each CPO, including those accountable for warehouse inventory, is furnished a summary statement reflecting the property charged to him/her or to his/her warehouse. This document, the "Inventory of Controlled Property," Form 9-067, is furnished to the CPO in duplicate, and is the official property record, Appendix D. Upon receipt of the Form 9-067, the property custodian will conduct a physical inventory as follows:

(1) Verify each item in his/her custody with the listing, checking the description, manufacturer's serial number, and that the Survey I.D. number is prominently displayed on the equipment. Note any exceptions on the listing.

(2) Line out the word "Suspense" and add the manufacturer's serial number for any item received. If the item does not contain a serial number, indicate "NONE" in the serial number field.

(3) Verify that leased items are still under lease. For leases which have expired or which were canceled, so note on the inventory in order that item(s) may be removed from the database.

(4) Add any equipment that is in his/her custody which does not appear on the listing, including all pertinent information. Always include a copy of the acquisition document for any item which has no SID number affixed unless obtaining the copy proves totally impossible. Submitting this copy will ensure that a duplicate SID number is not assigned.

(5) Submit documentation for items which cannot be located during the physical inventory. A Report of Property Survey (DI-103) must be completed for missing and damaged items and must be processed through the appropriate Property Survey Board as detailed in Chapter 5.

(6) For property which he/she has transferred to another CPO, attach to the Inventory a Property Transfer Request (Form 9-064) signed by both the transferor and transferee.

(7) Supply acquisition value estimates for any items which show a dollar value of zero and which were purchased at least two years prior to the inventory date.

(8) Attach all necessary documentation, sign the inventory, and forward to the appropriate APO.

B. APO Certification. Within 60 days of receipt of the inventory the APO will transmit all completed and reconciled inventories for his/her jurisdictional area with a written cover certification that all physical inventories have been completed and reconciled. A sample certification memorandum follows.

Memorandum

To: Property Management Officer, MS 210, Reston, VA 22092

Through: Property Administrator, _________________ Division

From: Accountable Property Officer

Office: ____________________________

Address: ____________________________

Subject: Physical Inventory Certification

Attached are Inventories of Controlled Property for all Custodial Property Officers (CPO's) within my APO area.

I certify that each CPO has completed and reconciled his/her periodic inventory of personal property, as instructed in the transmittal memorandum and as set forth in Chapter 3 of the Property Management Handbook.

4. Temporary and Other Removal of Controlled and Other Property From USGS Facilities.

A. Property Pass Procedures. In order to control the removal of property from Government buildings (whether owned or leased), a Property Pass (Form DI-1934), approved by an authorized official, must accompany all property when it is being removed from Government-controlled buildings. The DI-1934 is effective only for the specified period, and in no case for longer than 180 days. In addition to the Property Pass, the person removing Government property must have a written justification approved by his/her supervisor requiring that Government-owned equipment be used off-site. This may be accomplished by a supervisory statement on the property pass itself or a memorandum, which shall be retained by the person removing the property. A property pass may be required for vendors, contractors, and repair persons removing property from Government facilities as well as to remove privately-owned property from Government facilities. In these instances, a supervisor's written justification is not required, and the expiration date should reflect the date the property is removed.

The Form DI-1934 is self-explanatory. Be sure that the "Description of Property" is in sufficient detail to clearly describe or identify the property being removed, including the SID and manufacturer's serial number.

(1) Procedures

Specific procedures for handling the completed DI-1934 may vary from one location to another. The process outlined below is used at the National Center, and each locale should have a similar procedure. Contact your CPO for details.

The employee who is removing the property (the bearer/Cognizant Employee) completes the Property Pass (Form DI-1934). The "Removal Authorization" must be completed and signed by an authorized signer, as well as the bearer's APO/CPO. A Property Pass shall be issued for no longer than 180 days. The cognizant employee will prepare the Form for vendors who are removing items for repair purposes and the employee responsible for organizing an exhibition and/or demonstration in Government premises involving privately owned equipment will insure that Property Pass forms are prepared for such non-Government equipment.

(2) Copy Distribution.

The original (white copy) and the blue copy of the form shall be retained by the issuing CPO for followup and file. The bearer presents the yellow copy to the guard on duty, and retains the pink copy with the equipment.

Upon return of the equipment, the pink copy is noted by the CPO under the "Received by" block, and then returned to the bearer to retain as evidence that the item has been returned.

The bearer must return the Government property by the date specified on the Property Pass. The CPO must follow up with the employee or the repair contractor should the equipment not be returned by the date specified.

B. Form DI-1934. The following illustrates the Property Pass, DI-1934, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING PROPERTY PASS, DI-1934

(1) Name and signature of individual removing or entering with property.

(2) Check appropriate block.

(3) Enter building name, number or symbol.

(4) Date issued.

(5) Date to be returned, if being returned. For Government-owned property being removed by Government employee, maximum of 180 days.

(6) Reason for removing or entering with property.

(7) Complete description of property, including Survey I.D. Number and manufacturer's serial number.

(8) Check appropriate block.

(9) Authorized signature.

(10) Name, title and signature of Accountable Property Officer.

(11) For Security Office use.

(12) Signature of Custodial Property Officer (pink copy), upon return.

5. Property Requiring Special Handling.

A. Common-Use Property or Pooled Property. Often property is stored in unattended storage facilities, where the CPO is not on site and has no immediate oversight of the equipment. At a minimum, in such instances, a sign-out sheet or log must be maintained, and the users must be counseled in the proper procedures to follow in the use of Government property. Additional practices recommended are frequent inventorying, the use of temporary property receipts with follow-up maintained by the CPO, and key control for the storage facilities. When accountable property is removed for field use, the Survey I.D. number, serial number, and description should be logged and the user should sign as cognizant employee. The user must promptly report any property which becomes lost or damaged through any means other than normal wear and tear. Similarly, the user should report to the CPO immediately upon returning from the field any equipment returned from the field which is in need of repair and which has become damaged beyond repair through normal wear or tear, as well as that which has been rendered obsolete that should be disposed of.

These same procedures should be followed for office and other equipment which is managed through a "pooled" arrangement.

B. Sensitive and Susceptible Property. Special procedures over and above normal prudent care and custody are required to protect equipment items such as binoculars, cameras, pocket calculators, portable dictating equipment, VCR's, laptop computers, tape recorders, etc. which are highly susceptible to theft or conversion to personal use and to protect all sensitive property (firearms and ammunition) as well. To reduce the incidents of loss of such items, all CPO's and users must ensure that such items are:

(1) Stored in locked facilities when not in use;

(2) Removed from public view when leaving an unattended office for even short periods of time; and

(3) Safeguarded when on travel status, i.e., removed from planes, public or private vehicles, and removed from plain view in hotel or motel rooms.

CHAPTER 4. DISPOSAL

1. General. Excess personal property is a mandatory first source of supply and should be utilized to the maximum extent possible in lieu of procuring new property. Personal property which is no longer required by USGS shall not be disposed of through transfer to another Federal agency, or donated or sold until a determination has been made that such property cannot be utilized elsewhere within the bureau or the Department of the Interior. All offices must continually survey property under their control and promptly identify and dispose of unneeded personal property.

2. Authority. Federal and Interior Property Management Regulations, 41 CFR 101-43.3 and 114-43.43-302 contain the procedures to be followed in both reporting and acquiring excess personal property in order to obtain maximum utilization and to minimize procurement of new items.

In those instances where personal property is no longer needed by

a USGS program, it becomes available for transfer to another USGS program or to another bureau or office within DOI.

The USGS has very limited disposal authority without first reporting through the Department and GSA. This authority is limited to:

A. Disposal of uneconomically repairable and in some instances obsolete items by cannibalization or through the abandonment/destruction process. (Note: An item that is obsolete for the CPO's applications may meet the needs of other activities and is not necessarily or automatically eligible for abandonment/destruction. An item that is no longer manufactured or supported can be more valuable for replacement parts by some activity that has a need to continue using similar equipment.)

B. Transfer of "available" property to other bureaus within the Department of the Interior;

C. Limited direct transfers of excess property to other agencies in accordance with 41 CFR 101-43.309-5, including prearranged transfer in those cases where a known requirement exists.

3. Available/Excess Property.

A. Categories of Available/Excess.

(1) Reportable - As defined in 41 CFR 101-43.48, reportable property must always be reported to GSA. This includes both controlled and non-controlled reportable property.

(2) Non-Reportable - Non-reportable Government personal property as defined in 41 CFR 101-43.48 which becomes available/excess shall be screened within the DOI as available property in accordance with DOI Property Management Regulations 41 CFR 114-43.102-51 and may be reported as excess depending on its potential for reutilization. This includes both controlled and non-controlled non-reportable property.

B. CPO's Responsibilities.

(1) CPO's should make a reasonable effort to determine if there is a requirement within their jurisdictional area, and within their division, where feasible.

(2) If there is no requirement within the CPO's division, CPO's reporting property located within the D.C. metropolitan area (including Reston), the Denver metropolitan area, and the San Francisco bay metropolitan area (including Menlo Park) will prepare a Form 9-064, Property Transfer Request, transferring the items to the Reston, Denver, or Menlo Park warehouse as appropriate. In addition to the requirements set forth in paragraph 2 of this chapter, the 9-064 must include all of the information listed in paragraph (3) below in the "name of item" section of the form. Items which the warehouses cannot accommodate will be processed in accordance with (3) below, even if located in one the three listed metropolitan areas.

(3) If there is no requirement within the CPO's division, CPO's reporting property located outside the three metropolitan areas listed above, as well as property which the USGS warehouses cannot accommodate for any reason, shall prepare a Form SF 120. For the purpose of reporting excess and exchange/sale property, the SF 120 has replaced the Form 9-066. For items in need of repair, in addition to the condition code, a brief explanation of the nature and scope of required repairs must be included. Descriptions must include information that would enable potential users to determine whether or not item would meet their need, and must include all out of the ordinary factors. Out of the ordinary factors are not limited to, but would include special dismantling, packing, rigging, assembly, and handling requirements; special temperature, humidity, floor load and space requirements, and all special measures for protection of employee and/or public health and safety while item is in transit, storage or use. Where property will incur storage costs (that will terminate when property is removed) or when property is in space that must be vacated by a certain date, this information must be added to the description. If the CPO is aware of a potential requirement, the name and title, along with the business address and telephone number of the potential user(s), must also be included with the description; in most instances, this will significantly expedite final disposition. The SF 120 must be signed by the CPO and sent to the PMB or to a regional SMO as appropriate based on the physical location of the property.

It is the CPO's responsibility to promptly inform the PMB or appropriate Regional SMO of any changes in location, contact, condition, and/or availability of any items reported.

It is the CPO's responsibility to provide appropriate care and storage of reported items until final disposition is approved and accomplished.

It is the CPO's responsibility to ensure that all decals, labels and markings identifying items as USGS property are totally removed or effaced before items are shipped to or received by any transferee, donee, or purchaser (or designated representative).

C. PMB, Regional SMO's, and the Supply Management Branch Responsibilities.

Depending upon whether available/excess items are reportable or non-reportable, the PMB, Regional SMO's or the Materials Management Branch in Reston shall prepare either an SF 120, an SF 126, or an electronic equivalent for items transferred or reported in accordance with paragraph B.3. above.

(1) Transfers of Available Property Within DOI. Transfers of available personal property within USGS (intra-bureau transfers) and DOI (inter-bureau transfers) shall be recorded on a Property Transfer Request, Form 9-064. Inter-bureau transfers must state that the property is "excess to the needs of USGS."

(2) Direct Inter-Agency Transfers. Personal property not transferred within DOI at the end of the availability period and meeting the conditions stated below may be transferred directly to other Federal agencies. The requesting agency must prepare and submit to the PMB or appropriate regional SMO an SF 122 for:

(a) Reportable property not yet reported to GSA when its total acquisition cost does not exceed $5,000.00,

(b) Non-reportable property which has not been reserved for special screening by a GSA office and its total acquisition cost does not exceed $25,000.00; and

The appropriate GSA Regional Office is furnished an information copy of each direct transfer order, SF 122, within ten (10) working days from receipt of the order by the receiving activity (Reference 41 CFR 101-43.315-5.)

(3) Transfer of Excess Property Outside DOI. Transfers outside the DOI shall be documented on Standard Form SF 122 (Transfer Order, Excess Personal Property) initiated by the transferee in accordance with FPMR 101-43.309.

D. Release of Excess. Excess property that has been reported to GSA shall not be removed from its reported location except as directed by GSA. The CPO is held accountable for all property under his/her jurisdiction from time of acquisition until an authorized disposal has been completed. FPMR 41 CFR 101-45.104 requires each holding area to adequately protect excess personal property until transferred to another activity or until released to GSA. Inside storage should be provided whenever possible.

E. Removal of Bureau Identification. All identification markings which indicate that the property was previously owned by the USGS shall be removed prior to disposal.

F. Standard Form 120. The following illustrates the Report of Excess Personal Property, SF 120, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING REPORT OF EXCESS PERSONAL PROPERTY

SF 120

(1) Leave blank.

(2) Enter date prepared.

(3) - (7) Leave blank.

(8) Name and title of Custodial Property Officer.

(9) Individual most knowledgeable of item(s). Be sure to include both commercial and FTS telephone numbers.

(10) Custodial Property Officer's Signature.

(11) Custodial Property Officer's mailing address.

(12) Leave blank.

(13) FSC Class (first four digits of the property code). Do not mingle on one form items having different FSC Classes.

(14) Building, street address, etc., where the property is located and can be inspected. You may annotate same as Block 9 only if the address in Block 9 is also the property location.

(15) Leave blank.

(16) Optional for use of Custodial Property Officer.

(17) Leave blank.

(18) (a) Consecutive numbers for all line items in the report, beginning with "1."

(b) Describe each line item in detail - name of manufacturer, model, stock numbers, part numbers, etc. All of the information specified in 3.B.(3) above must be included in this block. Also be sure to include SID Number(s).

(c) Condition Code -- If condition cannot be accurately described by code, elaborate in Column (b).

(d) Unit -- Indicate the type of unit. This will usually be "EA" (each).

(e) Number of Units -- A line item may include a quantity of more than one only if all items bear the same description (except for serial and SID numbers) and are in the same condition.

(f) Per Unit Acquisition Cost -- Indicate the per unit acquisition cost.

(g) and (h) Leave blank.

G. Available/Excess Items Not Disposed of By GSA.

If any items reported excess are not successfully placed for reutilization, donated, or sold, authority for disposition of such items is returned to the USGS at which point the PMB or Regional SMO will immediately notify the CPO. Promptly upon notification by the PMB or Regional SMO, a Certificate of Unserviceable Property for items where disposition authority was returned by GSA should be initiated in accordance with the procedures set forth in Chapter 5 of this handbook. Normally, the initiating and approving officials should recommend abandonment/destruction in Section B of the Certificate due to the time and expense already expended by the USGS and by GSA to dispose of such items. However, donation or small lot sale may be recommended in Section B if an eligible donee is known or if a small lot sale would be economical.

H. Abandonment or Destruction.

Many items that are reported to GSA as excess that are subsequently returned to USGS for disposal as having "no commercial value" should not have been reported in the first place. Report only items that meet the criteria set forth in 41 CFR 101-43.4801 or items where there is a known requirement by another agency or eligible donee. Other obsolete and unserviceable items should be disposed of in accordance with 41 CFR 101-45.5, and Chapter 5 of this Handbook.

4. Cannibalization. Cannibalization is using the parts of an obsolete, unserviceable, or unrepairable piece of equipment to repair or improve a like item. Cannibalization of USGS-owned obsolete/unserviceable property does not require authorization from GSA. This action shall be requested in advance on a Certificate of Unserviceable Property which shall be completed and processed in accordance with the procedures set forth in Chapter 5 of this handbook. Time is of the essence in many instances. Should time not allow for advance approval due to the emergency nature of a repair to prevent an interruption of work on a project, the Certificate should be processed for approval within 30 days of the actual dismantling of the unserviceable item with a brief explanation of why advance approval was not feasible. Cannibalization of obsolete/unserviceable items is good business practice, and should be considered where feasible.

5. Exchange/Sale. Subject to the provisions of 41 CFR 101-46.2 in acquiring replacement personal property, certain categories of items may be exchanged or sold with the USGS authorized to apply the exchange allowance or the sales proceeds as total or as partial payment for the replacement property acquired. Although there are no disposal restrictions specific to available property acquired from other USGS and DOI activities, keep in mind that excess property acquired from activities outside of the Interior Department must be in the custody of the USGS for one full year before it can be disposed of by means of trade-in or exchange/sale. Under no circumstances may excess property be acquired from activities outside of the Interior Department for the purpose of trade-in or exchange/sale.

A. Trade-in. Requests for trade-in are accomplished on a Form 9-064, by inclusion of one of the following statements, certified by the CPO, concurred with by the APO, and approved by the servicing property office (Reston, Denver, Menlo Park).

There is a continuing need for the listed equipment that has become uneconomical to operate/maintain, meets any applicable replacement standards in accordance with 41 CFR 101-25.4, and qualifies for exchange in accordance with 41 CFR 101-46.2

_________________________ ___________

CPO Date

There is a continuing need for the listed equipment that lacks features/capabilities to perform the function for which it is intended, meets any applicable replacement standards in accordance with 41 CFR 101-25.4, and qualifies for exchange in accordance with 41 CFR 101-46.2.

__________________________ ____________

CPO Date

Two copies of the form (the original and the yellow) are forwarded by the CPO through the appropriate APO for signature, then on to the servicing Property Management Office for approval. The servicing Property Management Office will review the request for conformance to existing regulations, will note approval or disapproval on both copies and return the yellow copy to the CPO. Requisitions to headquarters or regional procurement activities citing a trade-in must state that an approval for the trade-in has been received. The original will be held by the PMB or Regional SMO in a suspense file until a signed copy from the vendor (or representative) has been received. The Regional SMO's will attach a copy of the receipted 9-064 to the approved original and will forward the package to the Headquarters PMB. The CPO will not be relieved of accountability until the vendor (or representative) has signed as receiving the property and until the signed receipt is received in the Headquarters Property Management Branch, MS 210, Reston, VA 22092.

The PMB and Regional SMO's will hold the original 9-064 in suspense for the balance of the FY in which it is received and for the duration of the immediately following FY, and then will discard it. If trade-in action is not completed within that time, a new approval will have to be initiated.

B. Sale.

(1) Policy. Due to the significant administrative and processing costs of this procedure, sale pursuant to exchange/sale authority should only be attempted when proceeds are likely to be significant. It is the policy of the USGS to apply this procedure on an exceptional rather than a routine basis for government personal property other than vehicles.

Prior approval of the APO must be obtained prior to effecting a sale pursuant to Exchange/Sale authority. Requests for such approvals are accomplished on SF 120, by inclusion of one of the following statements, certified by the CPO in Block 18(b).

There is a continuing need for the listed equipment that has become uneconomical to operate/maintain, meets any applicable replacement standards in accordance with 41 CFR 101-25.4, and qualifies for exchange in accordance with 41 CFR 101-46.2

_________________________ ___________

CPO Date

There is a continuing need for the listed equipment that lacks features/capabilities to perform the function for which it is intended, meets any applicable replacement standards in accordance with 41 CFR 101-25.4, and qualifies for exchange in accordance with 41 CFR 101-46.2

_________________________ ____________

CPO Date

(2) Procedure.

(a) The CPO submits to the PMB or the Regional SMO through the APO for approval an SF 120 completed in the same manner as SF 120's prepared for excess except:

Annotate FOR EXCHANGE/SALE prominently and include above signed APO statement in Block 18(b), and check YES in block 15. REIM/REQD.

(b) The PMB or Regional SMO will process a report to GSA. GSA will conduct a sale and deposit proceeds into the USGS' reimbursable account.

(c) The Office of Financial Management (OFM) routinely processes funds as exchange/sale for vehicles only. The CPO must make special arrangements on a case by case basis with OFM to have funds from sale of property other than vehicles processed as exchange/sale.

(d) Depending on arrangements made with OFM, proceeds from the sale can be utilized to reimburse an account that had been used to purchase the replacement or can be applied to the subsequent purchase of the replacement. Funds can be obligated only for a replacement for the item sold and must be obligated either within the FY in which they are deposited or during the immediately following FY after which they revert to miscellaneous receipts and are no longer available to the USGS.

(e) Property reported for sale as exchange/sale, but not successfully sold will then be treated as excess.

6. Leased Equipment. Leased equipment will be disposed of in accordance with the lease agreement.

7. Foreign Disposals. Upon determination by the USGS project chief that accountable/controlled property being used in foreign countries is excess to USGS requirements, it may be disposed of through the usual GSA excess process, or by applying the abandonment/destruction procedures set forth above.

8. Disposal of Firearms. Firearms can be made available by GSA for Federal transfer to other Federal agencies, including DOD, that are authorized to acquire firearms for official use. When no longer needed for Federal use, they will be disposed of as scrap after total destruction by either crushing, cutting, breaking, or deforming to be performed in a manner to ensure that the firearms are rendered completely inoperative and to preclude their being made operative. Such disposals shall be handled through your regional security officers.

Donation and public sale of firearms are prohibited.

9. Sale of Government Property to Federal Employees. USGS may purchase surplus personal property, subject to the provisions of SM 408.11.

10. Disposal of Special Protective Clothing and Equipment. Negotiated sales to employees of special protective clothing and equipment, such as prescription safety glasses, diver's wet suits, and safety toe shoes and boots may be made under the following circumstances.

A. It was designed or purchased for use by a specific

employee under 5 U.S.C. 7903.

B. Employee is separated or transferred to a function where

the special items are no longer required.

C. Proceeds from the sale are under $100.00

D. Competition is obtained to the extent possible under the circumstances.

E. Any such sales will be reported to GSA on an annual basis, in accordance with 41 CFR 114-45.105-3(b).

F. Sale values will be determined in accordance with 41 CFR 114.45.105-3(c).

11. Gifts Disposal. Any unconditional gifts (those with no stipulations concerning their use) which are accepted become the property of the USGS and must be entered into the PMDB. When an accepted gift cannot be used or had been used but is no longer required, it is reported to GSA for disposition in the same manner as other excess personal property.

CHAPTER 5 REPORTS OF SURVEY AND

CERTIFICATES OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY

1. General (410 DM 114-60.800). This chapter implements Boards of Survey and Reports of Survey procedures as specified in Interior Property Management Regulations 410 DM 114-60.8. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) must ensure the safeguarding of Government property against vulnerability to fraud, waste, and abuse. As managers of Government property we are, by law, held accountable for all property entrusted to our use. This chapter outlines the specific requirements for the conduct of Boards of Survey, completion of Reports of Unserviceable Property, and guidelines for the imposition of financial liability for Government-owned personal property which is lost, damaged, or destroyed. Each Property Administrator (PA), Accountable Property Officer (APO), and Custodial Property Officer (CPO) must ensure that all employees are aware of their responsibilities and are held accountable for Government property in their possession, and that all Government property is used only for official purposes.

These procedures apply to all Government personal property as defined in 410 DM 114-60.100(r) and all real property as defined in 41 CFR 101-47.103-12. This includes, but is not limited to, museum property, seized and forfeited property, abandoned property (lost and found), capitalized and non-capitalized, controlled and non-controlled, and non-expendable and expendable property where fraud, or other irregularities, appear to be related to a specific incident(s).

2. Requirements for Report of Survey and Board of Survey Action (410 DM 114-60.801 and 410 DM 114-60.803).

This paragraph implements the requirement for Reports of Survey and Board of Survey actions. Boards of Survey must be convened and an investigation conducted on all Reports of Survey, except those conducted by a Traveling Survey Officer or Local Survey Officer. However, Traveling and Local Survey Officers must conduct investigations as prescribed in this Chapter and 410 DM 114-60.8.

A. When Required. Report of Survey action is required to document the following circumstances:

(1) Any circumstance involving expendable or nonexpendable personal property, regardless of acquisition cost, and real property, where fraud or other irregularities appear to be connected to the incident;

(2) Any circumstance in which there is a possibility of a claim against the Government in connection with the administration, care, and use of Government property. Tort Claims Officers must be consulted in these situations;

(3) All lost or stolen property when the original acquisition cost of the property is $50 or more;

(4) All damage or destruction of property when the original acquisition cost of the property is $50 or more (not including worn out property, or that consumed through normal use);

(5) Loss, theft, damage, destruction, abandonment, determination of unserviceability, or cannibalization of sensitive property items, regardless of the original acquisition cost or circumstances. Sensitive property includes weapons, firearms, ammunition, explosives, hazardous materials, controlled substances, museum property, and proprietary programs or software;

(6) Donation of property to public bodies. Property shall not be donated to public bodies unless it is specifically determined in writing in the Report of Survey that all the circumstances of 41 CFR 101-44.7 and 114-44.7 are met; (this does not apply to donation to public bodies in lieu of abandonment/destruction when approval for abandonment/destruction has been documented on either a Report of Property Survey or a Certificate of Unserviceable property); and

(7) All destruction of, or damage to, a Geological Survey-owned, GSA-leased (Interagency Motor Pool) or commercially leased motor vehicle (whether leased by USGS or through GSA for USGS), vessel, or other motorized equipment resulting from an accident. All accidents must be investigated and reported in accordance with Chapter 5, USGS Safety and Environmental Health Handbook, 445-1-H, and in the case of a GSA vehicle the investigation required by 41 CFR 101-39.403 and the departmental Motor Vehicle Handbook, 412 DM 9. A determination as to financial liability must be based on all official reports of an investigation. It is the responsibility of the Board of Survey to make a determination as to whether or not an employee is to be held financially liable for the cost of the damages to the Government-owned or leased property as a result of the accident. Final Board of Survey action will be taken only after final disposition of any tort claim that may be involved or after it has been determined that there is no probability that a tort claim will be filed. A copy of all investigation reports will become an attachment to and made part of the Report of Survey.

B. When NOT Required. Report of Survey action is NOT required for the following actions which are otherwise authorized and/or amply documented, provided that such property is not being transferred or disposed of as a result of damage or destruction:

(1) Transfer of property within the USGS;

(2) Transfer of property to another bureau or office within the Department of the Interior when such property is no longer needed by the USGS;

(3) Excess property including:

(a) Items reported as excess to GSA, see Chapter 4.

(b) Excess items transferred to other Federal agencies in accordance with the FPMR and Chapter 4 of this Handbook.

(4) Property to be reported as Exchange/Sale or Trade-In. See the Chapter 4, for guidance on disposal of these categories of property; or

(5) When a Certificate of Unserviceable Property is used.

3. Conduct of a Board of Survey (410 DM 114-60.804).

A. Standing Board of Survey. Standing Boards of Survey of not less than three members shall be appointed at Headquarters, and at the regional offices in Denver and Menlo Park. Division Chiefs at Headquarters and Regional Division Heads shall each appoint one member and an alternate to the Board. One member shall serve as chairperson. Neither the APO, the employee responsible for the property to be surveyed, nor an employee with property management program administration responsibilities, shall be a voting member of the Board of Survey. The Administrative Division property management staff shall be available to serve on the Board in an advisory/technical capacity. The members of the standing Board will be appointed in writing for a period of at least 1 year, and will be provided written guidance for the conduct of a Board of Survey. Copies of such appointments will be provided the Bureau PMO no later than January 1 of each year. The PMO and regional RMO's must ensure that Board members and alternates are aware of their responsibilities as provided in this Chapter and 410 DM 114-60.87. Additional Boards of Survey may be appointed as deemed necessary. Requests for additional Boards should be processed through the APO and PA to the PMO for consideration.

B. Traveling Survey Officer. A Traveling Survey Officer has the same authorities, responsibilities, and restrictions as a Board of Survey and acts in lieu thereof. A Traveling Survey Officer may be appointed, in writing, by the Director, the PMO, the Property Administrator, or by the Accountable Property Officer. Traveling Survey Officers may be appointed by a higher official only when an organizationally subordinate office does not have sufficient property management skills or knowledge to conduct surveys on its own. A Traveling Survey Officer may be an employee with property management program administration responsibilities, but in no case will he/she conduct any action which will relieve himself/herself or his/her immediate supervisors of accountability.

C. Special Boards of Survey. Division Chiefs may appoint special Boards of Survey, in writing, in accordance with 114-60.804-4, to investigate unusual losses of property such as those resulting from disaster (fire, flood, etc.), or where APO's may be personally responsible for lost, stolen, damaged, or destroyed property.

4. Reports of Survey (410 DM 60.800).

A. Preparation and Approval. Report of Survey, Form DI-103, will be used to document results of the Board findings and determinations. The report, including the statement of circumstances, shall be prepared in triplicate. Two copies shall be forwarded for Survey Board action, and the third copy shall be retained by the initiating office. Additional copies may be prepared at the discretion of the division or initiating office. Section A of the Report of Survey, with the exception of the APO signature block, shall be completed by the CE/user. The CE/user shall forward the report through his/her CPO (for review) and then on to the appropriate APO for approval in Section A. The APO, after review and approval, will forward the report to the appropriate regional or Headquarters Survey Board for action. In instances where the CE/user is the APO, he/she should forward the report to his/her PA for approval. If the CE/user is the PA, he/she should forward the report to the Division Chief.

The Survey Board will act on the report and forward it with their recommendation to the appropriate RA for action. The RA will complete Section D. In the event of disagreement between the Board and RA, the case will be forwarded for review and resolution by the Director.

Survey action shall be initiated within 30 days upon discovery of property loss, theft, damage, or destruction. Delays of over 30 days in initiating survey action shall be justified, in detail, by the APO and shall be made part of the Report of Survey.

B. Form DI-103. The following illustrates the Report of Survey, Form DI-103, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING REPORT OF SURVEY

FORM DI-103

General: The DI-103 shall be prepared in triplicate (two copies to be forwarded), including the statement of circumstances, by the Cognizant Employee (CE)/User or Custodial Property Officer (CPO) and the Accountable Property Officer, (APO).

Report No.: (For use of reporting office)

Date: Preparation Date.

Section A: - Office identification and phone number of the CPO.

- Address of APO.

- Description of Item(s), including Survey I.D.,

manufacturer serial number, model, etc.

- Original Acquisition Cost.

- Condition Code.

- Estimated Current Value.

Section B: - Signatures of the CE and CPO; forward to APO for approval in Section A.

AT THIS POINT, THE APO WILL SUBMIT THE COMPLETED FORM TO HIS/HER APPROPRIATE REGIONAL OR HEADQUARTERS PROPERTY SURVEY BOARD FOR ACTION.

Section C: - To be completed by the Survey Board.

Section D: - To be completed by the Reviewing Authority.

Section E: - To be completed by Bureau Director, in the event of disagreement between the Board and Reviewing Authority.

Section F: - Destruction Certification--two witnesses required.

Section G: - Property Management Branch, Mail Stop 210, Reston, Virginia 22092, will adjust the property records.

5. Board of Survey Procedures (410 DM 114-60.806).

A. Investigations. Investigations/reviews/examinations conducted by Boards of Survey and other Survey Officers shall be objective, comprehensive, and thorough. Every effort shall be made to determine the whereabouts of missing property. Members shall be diligent in utilizing every available source of information, including review of records and interviews of employees or other persons. They will call for all evidence obtainable and will not limit inquiries to evidence or statements presented by parties in interest. Reports of Survey shall document results of such investigations/reviews/examination. At a minimum, the Board of Survey, or other Survey Officer, must answer to their satisfaction appropriate questions such as:

(1) Did the employee fulfill his/her responsibilities for the proper and reasonable care, use, and safekeeping of the property? Did the employee exercise the degree of care which a prudent person would exercise under like circumstances for his own personal property?

(2) Has this employee requested relief of accountability for similar instances in the past?

(3) Was the property being used for official Government purposes only?

(4) Did the employee satisfactorily explain the circumstances surrounding the situation, and was the evidence consistent with the explanation that the loss occurred despite all reasonable care and precautions taken by the employee concerned?

(5) Was there evidence that the supervisor fulfilled his/her responsibilities by providing proper instructions to the employee regarding the care, use, and safekeeping of the property? Did the employee understand these responsibilities?

(6) Were the employee and supervisor informed of the requirements of 410 DM 114-60.8 with regard to the determination of simple or gross negligence?

(7) In the case of a motor vehicle, vessel, or other motorized equipment accident, was there an investigation by local law enforcement personnel? If so, does the investigation report show weather conditions, road conditions, etc.? Was the employee issued a legal citation as a result of the accident? Was there a defect in the equipment which could have contributed to the accident?

(a) Was there an accident investigation conducted as required by Chapter 5, Safety and Environmental Health Handbook, or in the case of a GSA-leased vehicle 41 CFR 101-39.403 and the departmental Motor Vehicle Handbook 412 DM 9?

(b) Was there any conflict in the supporting documentation, i.e., law enforcement investigation reports, Board of Inquiry investigative reports, any other investigation reports, or employee statements? If so, can the Board of Survey, or other Survey Officers, clearly determine results from such conflicts?

B. Findings. The Board of Survey members or other Survey Officers must independently make their findings and determinations based upon the merits of each individual case. Findings must be supported by logical written determinations. It is the responsibility of the Board of Survey or other Survey Officers to determine if simple or gross negligence exists, or whether an employee should or should not be held financially liable in accordance with their interpretation of this Chapter and 410 DM 114-60.8.

C. Determination of Property Value. Board of Survey members or other Survey Officers must also determine if damaged property has further usefulness in its present condition, or after cost-justified or justifiable reconditioning is accomplished.

D. Majority Rules. If Boards of Survey members cannot agree upon final determinations, the majority vote shall rule. In these cases, each Board of Survey member's final determination shall be made part of the Report of Survey, including any dissenting comments.

6. Review of Board Findings (410 DM 114-60.808).

A. Findings and determinations of a Board of Survey or other Survey Officer shall be final and are not subject to change or modification by the designated RA. The designated RA may not disapprove a Report of Survey. He/she may, however, return a Report of Survey to the Board for reasons of technical insufficiency or inadequate documentation. The reasons must be stated, in writing, and made a part of the Report of Survey. Based on the reasons provided, the Board members shall prepare a final finding and determination and resubmit the Report of Survey to the designated RA within 30 days.

B. The RA shall complete actions on all Reports of Survey within 30 days after receipt.

7. Determination of Liability.

A. Negligence Determination. When Government property is lost, damaged, or destroyed, the Board of Survey will determine whether the employee(s) involved was negligent, and whether such negligence resulted in the loss, damage, or destruction of Government property. In any instance where employee negligence resulted in loss, damage, or destruction of Government property, the Board will use the following guidelines in arriving at findings pertaining to the financial liability of an employee:

(1) When the Board of Survey or other Survey Officer findings and determinations are concluded, and when they positively reflect that the loss, theft, damage, or destruction of the property resulted from simple or gross negligence, the employee is to be held financially liable.

(2) When the Board of Survey or other Survey Officer has determined that the employee has produced evidence and information which substantiates that circumstances beyond the control of the employee impaired the custody, protection, and care of the property, the employee shall not be held financially liable.

B. Guidance. Boards of Survey and other Survey Officers shall use the guidance contained in 410 DM 114-60.812.1, USGS Boards of Survey Operating Guidelines, and this Chapter in arriving at findings and determinations pertaining to the financial liability of an employee.

C. Financial Liability Determination. When a Board of Survey or other Survey Officer determines that an employee should be held liable for property loss, damage, theft, or destruction, they shall determine and specify, in writing, the exact dollar amount of financial liability. The amount of liability shall be the estimated or actual cost of repairs for damage that was a direct result of the incident, regardless of whether or not the property is repaired. The amount of liability for property lost, stolen, or destroyed should take into account the original acquisition cost, depreciation, estimated salvage value, expected useful life of the item, and current fair market value of the item based upon the condition and age of the property at the time of its loss, theft, or destruction. The amount of liability shall not exceed the original acquisition cost or estimated original cost of capitalized property. This does not apply to museum property, as this type of property generally appreciates rather than depreciates.

When a Board of Survey finds that an employee should be held liable for property loss, damage, or destruction of a Government vehicle, which resulted from an act of simple negligence, the employee shall be held financially liable for either $200, or the amount of loss, damage, or destruction, whichever is less, taking into account the original acquisition cost, depreciation, and value to the Government at the time of its loss, damage, or destruction. (Note. The maximum amount of liability is based upon the standard insurance deductible benefits which would occur if an employee were operating a privately-owned vehicle)

D. Employee Notification and Participation. The Board Chairperson shall provide the employee with a copy of the Report of Survey which includes the findings and determinations, including determinations of financial liability, if applicable. The employee will be provided a 30-day period in which he/she may provide to the Board any additional pertinent information which may have a bearing on the findings and determinations. Any such information provided will become a part of the Report of Survey and will be considered in the investigation and any subsequent determinations of financial liability.

When a Board of Survey investigation is to be conducted, the employee(s) involved will be given due notice of the investigation and will be permitted to submit written, signed statements for the investigative file. Employees will be relieved of accountability and financial liability for missing, damaged, or destroyed Government property when they provide factual evidence and documentation to satisfy the Survey Board that negligence was not a factor and that financial liability should not be imposed.

E. Appeal. An employee may appeal a Board of Survey finding of simple or gross negligence and/or financial liability. Appeal procedures are contained in 370 DM 550.

8. Financial Liability and Disciplinary Actions (410 DM 114-60.812-5).

The assessment of financial liability is not to be used in lieu of or as a form of disciplinary action. Under no circumstances shall a Board of Survey or other Survey Officer make determinations concerning disciplinary action.

9. Billing the Employee (410 DM 114-60.812-7).

A. When it is determined by the Board of Survey that an employee should be held financially liable for Government property loss, damage, theft, or destruction and that determination has been approved by the RA, the APO for the property shall prepare a memorandum to the Office of Financial Management requesting that the employee be billed for the amount liable, together with a copy of the approved Report of Survey specifying the amount of financial liability.

B. When an employee is held financially liable as a result of survey action, the procedures outlined in 410 DM 114-60.812-9, 370 DM 550, Subchapter 10, Debt Collection by Salary Offset, and Survey Manual 338.4.8 shall apply.

C. Employees have the right to appeal all determinations of financial liability as a result of survey action. The procedures outlined in 370 DM 350, Subchapter 10, Debt Collection by Salary Offset, and 338.4.8 shall be used for all appeals.

10. Certificates of Unserviceable Property (410 DM 114-60.802).

Extreme caution must be exercised when using a Certificate of Unserviceable Property. Its use must meet all the requirements of this section and 410 DM 114-60.802.

A. Not to be Used. A Certificate of Unserviceable Property will not be used for property that is lost or stolen, regardless of cost, or for weapons, firearms, ammunition, explosives, hazardous materials, controlled substances, museum property, and proprietary software. In addition it shall not be used when: (1) property irregularities are apparent; (2) possible claims against the Government are involved; (3) there is a need to determine whether an employee may be held financially liable; (4) the property is to be repaired and placed back into service; or (6) the property is to be reported to GSA as excess or exchange/sale.

B. When Used. A Certificate of Unserviceable Property may be used when the property is physically on hand and a determination is made for the condemnation of property for cannibalization, salvage, reduction to scrap, destruction, or abandonment when none of the conditions in paragraph 3.A. above apply.

C. Procedures for Completing. When an operating official/CE believes property to be unserviceable, he/she shall complete a Certificate of Unserviceable Property detailing the circumstances surrounding the unserviceability, and shall include: (1) a complete description of the property; (2) SID numbers, serial numbers, or other identifying markings; (3) the date the property was inspected; (4) estimated current value of the property; (5) whether it has exceeded its useful life; and (6) the estimated cost to repair. A statement should be included to indicate that "the property has no commercial value, and that the cost of care, handling and preparation of the property for sale would be greater than the expected sale proceeds (estimated fair market value)." Omit preceding statement only for property which previously had been reported excess and when the initiator or approving official is thoroughly convinced that a small lot sale would be economical to conduct. If small lot sale or donation is recommended and approved, PMB or Regional SMO will provide instructions to the CPO; The CPO or CE will then conduct the sale or make the donation. When requesting permission to abandon or destroy the item(s), the certificate should also describe the proposed method of destruction or the abandonment location with a statement that the proposed abandonment or destruction action will not be detrimental or dangerous to public health or safety, and will not infringe on the rights of other persons.

D. Form DI-103A. The following illustrates the Certificate of Unserviceable Property, Form DI-103A, and outlines step-by-step procedures for correctly completing it.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING CERTIFICATE OF UNSERVICEABLE PROPERTY

FORM DI-103A

General: The DI-103A shall be prepared in triplicate (two copies to be forwarded and one to be retained by initiating office).

Certificate No.: (For use of the reporting office.)

Date: Preparation Date.

Section A: - Complete address and phone number of the originating office and name, address of the Accountable Property Officer (APO).

- Denote whether "Unserviceable, Obsolete, or Other." BE SURE TO INCLUDE A DETAILED STATEMENT OF CIRCUMSTANCES JUSTIFYING YOUR REQUEST FOR RELIEF OF ACCOUNTABILITY (See paragraph 10.C).

- Provide a full description of the items, including Survey I.D., manufacturer serial number, etc.; Original Acquisition Cost, Condition Code, and Estimated Fair Market Value.

Section B: - Recommend disposition.

- Two levels of approval are required in this section -- either the CE/User and CPO, the CPO and APO, or the APO and PA. The second approving official must be at least one level higher in the property accountability structure than the person who signed as the first approving official.

Section C: - To be completed by the Regional Supply Management Officer, Denver or Menlo Park, or the Headquarters Property Management Branch for Eastern Region and Headquarters property. Those offices will review the Certificate and make a recommendation for disposal.

Section D: - The Certificate will be returned to the CPO by Property Staff for disposal of item(s) and completion of Certificate of Destruction.

Section E: - The completed Certificate, including certification of destruction, will be forwarded to Headquarters Property Management Branch, Mail Stop 210, Reston,

Virginia 22092, for adjustment to the Property records.

The original Certificate will be maintained in the Headquarters Property files, and an annotated copy will be returned to the CPO.

E. Required Copies. The Certificate of Unserviceable Property, Form DI-103A shall be prepared in triplicate. Additional copies may be prepared at the discretion of a CPO, APO, PA, or a division chief. The original and one copy shall be submitted through channels for approval or disapproval by the RA. The third copy shall be retained by the initiating office.

F. Approvals. The Certificate of Unserviceable Property shall be approved by two levels in the property accountability chain (the CE/user and the CPO, the CPO and APO, or the APO and PA). If the higher approving level agrees with the prepared statement of circumstances, he/she shall make a determination regarding disposition as follows: (1) If any of the conditions in paragraph 3.A. above exist, the action for unserviceability is terminated and an appropriate action is initiated; or (2) if the property is determined to be unserviceable, sign the Certificate and submit it to the PMO or appropriate regional SMO for review and approval or disapproval.

G. Reviews. The RA may disapprove the Certificate if supporting information provided is inadequate, incomplete, or does not provide sufficient information to justify an adjustment to property records and grant relief of accountability. The RA must outline the deficiencies and specify what additional information is required. Within 30 days the initiating official must submit either a revised Certificate of Unserviceable Property with appropriate statements to the RA or a Report of Survey in accordance with appropriate procedures. If the designated RA disapproves the Certificate a second time, it shall be submitted to the respective PA or division chief for a final decision.

H. Completion Time. The RA shall complete all actions on Certificates of Unserviceable Property within 30 days after receipt.

I. Disposal Action. If approved by the RA, the Certificate of Unserviceable Property shall be completed by that individual and returned to the responsible CPO for disposal action. When destruction is authorized, the CPO must ensure that: (1) the property is destroyed; (2) there are at least two witnesses to the destruction, one of whom may perform the destruction; and (3) the signatures of the witnesses are obtained on the Certificate (see paragraph 13). The completely executed original will be forwarded to the Property Management Branch, Mail Stop 210, Reston, Virginia.

J. Sale or Donation in Lieu of Abandonment and Destruction. After the CPO receives approval for abandonment and destruction of unserviceable/obsolete items, he/she may determine to attempt a local sale, or to donate the property to public agencies and eligible nonprofit tax-exempt activities as set forth in 41 CFR 101-44.2. This procedure applies when approval was initially requested and granted for abandonment/destruction. If the CPO wishes to donate or conduct a sale in lieu of approved abandonment or destruction, the following public notice must be given for a period of not less than 7 calendar days. See paragraph 10 C. above for circumstances where a recommendation to sell or donate is initially requested on the Certificate of Unserviceability.

K. Sample Public Notice. The following is a sample public notice to be used when the CPO opts to sell or donate items that have been approved for abandonment and destruction.

PUBLIC NOTICE OF

ABANDONMENT OR DESTRUCTION

1. NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that the U.S. Geological Survey proposes to initiate abandonment or destruction procedures for the following surplus Government property.

Item name:

General Description:

NSN:

Quantity:

Condition:

Unit of Issue:

Total Acquisition Cost:

2. DONATION.

Beginning on ______________________________, until close of business _______________________, the above property will be available for donation to public bodies. After this time all remaining property will be abandoned or destroyed in accordance with applicable Government disposal regulations.

3. SALE.

Notwithstanding the above, commencing with the posting of this notice and so long as the property is available, the Government will consider the sale of all or any portion of this property to any or all interested parties on a first-come, first-served basis.

4. INSPECTION.

This property is available for inspection at ______________________ from

______________ to ______________ Monday through Friday, excluding holidays and weekends. Interested parties are invited to contact:

11. Property Irregularities.

A. In addition to the general requirements of 410 DM 114-60.8 and this Chapter, 355 DM 2 requires additional investigation of property irregularities when the situation warrants. The provisions of 355 DM 2 pertaining to Office of the Inspector General (OIG) investigations are in addition to Board of Survey requirements, and do not relieve Accountable Property Officers from ensuring that appropriate Board of Survey actions are conducted under these circumstances.

There are certain incidents involving Government property that require immediate reporting to the OIG. Known, suspected, or alleged fraud, waste, or abuse affecting Government-owned or -leased property must be immediately reported to the OIG, with the exception of those incidents requiring immediate police action. These incidents shall be reported directly to appropriate Federal and/or local law enforcement officers at or near the site of the crime. However, they then must be reported to the OIG when appropriate. Examples of property irregularities that could be highly vulnerable to fraud, waste or abuse include:

(1) Loss, damage or destruction to Government property in which the total loss suffered is in excess of $10,000, either in the aggregate for a single incident, or for a single item;

(2) Repetitive losses of a particular type of property or recurring losses at a given location;

(3) Losses of a suspicious nature;

(4) Evidence of serious misconduct or irregularity (fraud, falsification of records, etc.);

(5) Misappropriation of Government property; and

(6) Loss or theft of a firearm or weapon, ammunition, explosives, hazardous materials, or controlled substances.

B. All reports of property irregularities shall be forwarded by the APO through the appropriate PA to the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia. All further actions on the incident shall be suspended pending determinations by the OIG.

C. In instances where a determination is made that property irregularities do not exist, or where the OIG determines that an investigation is not appropriate, the employee is not necessarily or automatically relieved of financial liability. The Board of Survey or other Survey Officer, in their final determinations, must determine if any evidence of simple or gross negligence exists. If the Board of Survey or other Survey Officer finds that such does exist, the employee shall be held financially liable.

12. Theft or Vandalism.

Cases of theft or vandalism will be reported immediately to the appropriate Federal and/or local law enforcement officers at or near the site of the offense, followed by a Report of Survey within 30 days upon discovery of the theft or loss.

13. Witnessing Destruction or Reduction to Scrap (410 DM 114-60.806-6).

Where approved Reports of Survey/Certificates of Unserviceable Property direct the destruction or reduction to scrap of property, such disposition shall be witnessed by two individuals, one of whom may be the destroying official, and the DI-103/DI-103A signed by the witnesses. The witnessing officer may not be the APO or a CPO of the property. A witness who sees that a bona fide scrap dealer accepts custody of an item may certify that it has been reduced to scrap without further witnessing subsequent disposition.

14. Removal of Surveyed Property from Property Accountability Records.

Missing property will not be removed from the property accountability records until the Board of Survey completes the Report of Survey, the RA has approved the Report of Survey, and the Headquarters Property Office has received the original completed document. The approved Report of Survey will serve as the authority for deletion of the item(s) from the property accountability records.

15. Distribution of Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property.

The original of all completed/fully executed Reports of Survey and Certificates of Unserviceable Property will be forwarded to the Bureau Property Management Officer, Mail Stop 210, Reston, Virginia 22092.

16. Reports (410 DM 114-60.813). No later than November 1 of each fiscal year, the PMO shall submit a consolidated Report of Property Surveyed and Employee Liability (DOI-85-094) to the Director, Acquisition and Property Management, DOI.

CHAPTER 6. MOTOR VEHICLES

1. General. This chapter describes custodial responsibilities concerning the proper management, reporting, and operating procedures of USGS-owned and leased motor vehicles. This chapter supplements controlling legislation, applicable provisions of the Federal Property Management Regulations (41 CFR 101), and departmental policies and guidelines (412 DM).

2. Definitions. Definitions contained in Chapter 1, Definitions, apply to general Government personal property management terms when used in this chapter. The definitions below are specific to vehicle management.

Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). The weight of the vehicle fully equipped plus the maximum load recommended by the manufacturer to give the best performance under most conditions and including all fluids at full capacity and the average weight of a driver.

Lease. A contract or other arrangement under which a motor vehicle is obtained from a commercial firm for a period of 60 continuous days or more.

Motor Vehicle. Item of equipment which is self-propelled by mechanical power, including passenger, transport, and special-use vehicles, and which is carried as part of the vehicle fleet in USGS property records.

Preventive Maintenance. The routine and scheduled inspection and servicing of motor vehicles and motor equipment in accordance with the manufacturer-specified warranty maintenance requirements. Preventive maintenance includes periodic oil changes, tune ups, lubrications, fluid replenishment, filter changes, etc. The term "preventive maintenance" means the same as "scheduled maintenance."

Rental. Contract or other arrangement under which a motor vehicle is obtained from a commercial firm for a period of less than 60 days.

3. Motor Vehicle Acquisition.

A. Supply Sources. The sources of supply for motor vehicles are listed below in priority sequence.

(1) Under-utilized on-hand vehicles

(2) Excess vehicles

(3) GSA Interagency Fleet Management System Vehicles

(4) Agency owned vehicles

(5) Agency leased vehicles

(6) Agency rented vehicles

B. Lease Versus Purchase Determination. Prior to leasing vehicles on a long-term basis (60 consecutive days or more), a lease-versus-purchase determination should be made by the requisitioning office in accordance with 41 CFR 101-25.5. All vehicles acquired for USGS operations must be specific to and justified for program needs and must achieve maximum fuel efficiency.

C. GSA Fleet Management System. Detailed procedures covering the acquisition, management, and disposal of vehicles from the GSA Fleet Management System are contained in the departmental Motor Vehicle Handbook (412 DM), or through contacting your servicing property office.

D. Purchases. Most vehicle purchases are made through the General Services Administration (GSA); however, there are instances where GSA grants a waiver and vehicles are purchased locally through the bureau procurement process. Such waivers are generally granted when specialized equipment must be incorporated into the design of the vehicle, or the vehicle must have unique body characteristics which require that USGS maintain close coordination with the contractor. Waivers are sometimes granted when time is of the essence as a result of new program needs.

For routine motor vehicle acquisitions, requests for procurement (Motor Vehicle Requisition-Delivery Order, GSA Form 1781, Appendix E) are initiated by the procuring office and are processed through the respective division's headquarters administrative office for approval. That office forwards the requisition to the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia, for review, approval, and subsequent processing through OFM to GSA. The order must reference tag number of the vehicle being traded in, if the vehicle being ordered is a replacement vehicle.

(1) Passenger Vehicles. Funds may not be expended to purchase passenger vehicles unless specifically authorized by bureau appropriation language. The PMB coordinates with the Programs Office the inclusion of passenger vehicle acquisitions in the annual appropriation language, based on input received from all divisions.

(2) Request for Waivers. When the procuring office determines that the procurement of a motor vehicle is required from sources other than GSA (through local procurement), a request for a waiver justifying the local procurement shall be submitted in writing to the Property Management Branch, through the headquarters divisional administrative office to PMB.

The justification should include a complete description and intended use of the vehicle and must also state whether the vehicle was included in the forecast (as required by 412 DM, Chapter 2); it must describe in detail the unique features of the vehicle to be procured.

The Headquarters Property Management Branch will process all requests for waivers through DOI to GSA.

When a waiver to purchase locally is granted by GSA, the procurement is accomplished through the normal procurement channels. Once the vehicle is received, the CPO must forward the following documents to GSA to complete their files.

(a) Solicitation or invitation for bids

(b) Bid Tabulation

(c) Contract Award

(d) Receiving Report

(3) Routing. These forms should be submitted directly to GSA, Automotive Center (FCT H-H2), Crystal Mall Building 4, Room 921, Washington, D.C. 20406.

E. Commercial Leasing. Detailed procedures covering the acquisition of vehicles through commercial leasing are contained in the Departmental Motor Vehicle Handbook (412 DM). All commercial leases must be coordinated through the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia.

4. Motor Vehicle Accountability.

A. CPO Responsibility. The CPO is responsible for the vehicle once it is received. The procedures for establishing and maintaining accountability of motor vehicles are identical to those for other accountable property. However, in addition, the Property Management Branch will furnish U.S. Government license plates, U.S. Government National Credit Cards, and U.S. Government identification decals for each new vehicle. These will be forwarded to the CPO along with the customary copies of the Form 9-065.

Immediately upon receipt of a vehicle, the CPO shall ensure that:

(1) License tags and decals are placed on the vehicle.

(2) The Form 9-065 is completed as to serial number, delivery date, and signature of CPO.

(3) One completed and signed copy of the Form 9-065 is returned to the Property Management Branch, Mail Stop 210, Reston, Virginia 22092.

(4) One copy of the Form 9-065 is retained.

B. USGS Identification Number. Department of the Interior license plates are assigned each vehicle. The license plate number serves as the USGS Identification Number for the vehicle and is the property number which remains with the vehicle, (unless the plate is lost or destroyed), until it is disposed of. Missing tags or damaged/defaced tags may be replaced by written request to the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia. CPO's shall report the loss or theft of tags to local security personnel.

C. U.S. Government Identification. All USGS-owned or leased motor vehicles shall display the legends "For Official Use Only" and "U.S. Government" and immediately below the legends the agency identification may be applied to the left side of the rear window, not more than 1 and 1/2 inches from the bottom of the window, or centered on both front doors. These decals will be provided by the Property Management Branch to the CPO's.

D. Ownership Evidence. All documents indicating ownership, issued by the manufacturer, are forwarded to the Property Management Branch, Reston, Virginia 22092.

E. Motor Vehicle Use and Storage.

(1) Official Use. No Government-owned vehicle will be used for other than official purposes. THERE ARE NO EXCEPTIONS. The minimum penalty required by the U.S. Code (5 USC 78 (c)(2)) for willful use of official vehicles for other than official purposes is a thirty (30) day suspension from duty without pay.

(2) Driving Practices. All local motor vehicle laws will be strictly observed by drivers of Government-owned vehicles. All drivers should be thoroughly familiar with USGS regulations, such as:

(a) Safety and Environmental Health Handbook 445-1-H

(b) Automobile Liability Insurance, SM 451.4.5

(c) Motor Vehicle Operator's Regulations,

(3) Seat Belts. Occupant restraint systems in all USGS- owned or leased motor vehicles shall be maintained in good working condition. Each vehicle occupant shall properly utilize the restraint system provided.

(4) Non-Official Passengers. Transporting non-official passengers in Government-owned vehicles creates a potential liability for the vehicle operators and the Government. Therefore, transporting such passengers must be kept to a minimum.

(5) Hitchhikers. Providing Rides to Hitchhikers is Strictly Prohibited.

(6) Use of Government Vehicle Between Domicile and Place of Employment. Use of official vehicles for transportation between an employee's domicile and place of employment is specifically prohibited, with very few exceptions. These exceptions apply to employees in field work status who work under specific job series or positions which have been previously approved for portal-to-portal vehicle use.

(7) Use of Government Vehicle by an Employee in Official Travel Status. Official vehicles may be used by an employee in travel status to drive to his/her residence when it is in the interest of the Government that the official travel start from there rather than from the place of employment. The vehicle may also be stored at the residence at the conclusion of the trip when such storage is in the interest of the Government. Such storage approval must be approved by the employee's APO in advance with a statement reflecting how such storage is in the interest of the Government. Official vehicles may also be used to go between an employee's temporary lodging, place of business, and other permissible places set forth in paragraph 1-1-2.6.a of the Federal Travel Regulations.

(8) Official Use by Non-USGS Entities. Employees of grantees, contractors, and subcontractors authorized to use Government vehicles may do so solely in the performance of the work authorized under the Government grant, contract or subcontract.

(9) Parking and Storage. Government motor vehicles shall be stored in facilities which provide protection from pilferage or damage. In the interest of economy, open storage shall be used whenever practicable and feasible.

Operators of Government-owned, leased or rented vehicles are subject to all parking laws and regulations promulgated by all levels of government of any authorized public entity. Responses to citations and payment of fines as a result of violating these laws are the personal responsibility of the vehicle operator.

(10) Property Loss/Damage/Destruction. When Government property is lost, damaged, or destroyed, a Board of Survey will conduct an official investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding such loss, damage, or destruction in accordance with IPMR 114-60.8. In making its investigation, the Board will consider the possibility that the employee(s) involved was responsible for the loss, damage, or destruction in accordance with Chapter 5 of this Handbook.

(11) Recall of Motor Vehicles. Recalls are handled through the Headquarters Property Management Branch and coordinated with the manufacturers, GSA, and the CPO.

F. Motor Vehicle Rental System. This is a USGS program designed to recover the acquisition cost of vehicles and is not compulsory; the rental rates are established and the accounts are managed by each participating division.

G. Preventive Maintenance. Federal regulations require adherence to an effective vehicle preventive maintenance program and schedule. The preventive maintenance shall be that recommended by the manufacturer. In the absence of a manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule, the following shall apply:

(1) Engine tune-up every 12,000 miles or 12 months, whichever comes first, which shall include, as a minimum, replacement of points, rotor, condenser, spark plugs (if applicable), and resetting the timing.

(2) Engine oil change every 6,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first.

(3) Lubrication of all grease fittings every 6,000 miles or 6 months, whichever comes first.

(4) Rotation of tires every 12,000 miles.

(5) Safety Inspection (See "Safety Inspection Checklist," paragraph 8 below) at intervals not to exceed 12 months by qualified/competent mechanics.

(6) Annual Services, to include checking and servicing vacuum hoses, fittings and connections, spark system, air injection system, air cleaner, transmission, springs and hangers, brake system, wheel bearings, vents, shock absorbers and drive belts.

H. Negligence. The failure of the CPO to schedule preventive maintenance or to notify the vehicle user/operator of the maintenance requirements may be construed as negligence on his/her part. Likewise, vehicle users/operators who fail to have maintenance performed as instructed by the CPO and established procedures may be considered as acting in a negligent manner.

I. Utilization Standards. The utilization standards shown below apply to USGS-owned and-leased motor vehicles.

Vehicle Type Standard Annual Minimum Annual

Sedans/Station Wagons 12,000 8,000

Multiple Drive Vehicles 7,000 5,000

Trucks (2-wheel drive)

(Less than 12,500 GVWR) 10,000 5,000

(12,500 - 16,999 GVWR) 7,500 4,000

(17,000 GVWR and over) 7,500 4,000

J. Quarterly Utilization Review. The Headquarters Property Management Branch is responsible for monitoring the utilization of the USGS motor vehicle fleet. That Branch provides a quarterly motor vehicle utilization report, including a listing of unreported vehicles, to each Division Chief for his/her information and review.

In cases where the minimum utilization standards have not been met, PMB will ascertain from the appropriate Division official the future need for the vehicle and the possibility of reassignment either within that Division or elsewhere in the bureau in order to obtain better utilization. Each CPO should conduct periodic utilization reviews of Government-owned vehicle assignments and take corrective action as needed to ensure that the number of vehicles is not in excess of actual requirements.

If vehicles remain under-utilized for an additional two quarters, the Administrative Division will recommend (1) transfer within the Bureau to where they would better utilized, or (2) disposal through the excess procedures. A sample Usage Analysis Report with legend appears as Appendix F.

K. Exemption from Utilization Criteria. When adequately documented and justified, vehicles may be exempted from the utilization criteria. A complete, detailed justification must be provided to the Headquarters Property Management Branch for approval of exemption.

5. Vehicle Disposals. It is the policy of the USGS that motor vehicles shall be disposed of under the exchange/sale authority cited in 41 CFR 101-46 whenever the vehicle disposed of will be replaced by a like vehicle. Vehicles that are excess to the needs of the holding office and that are not being replaced may be transferred within USGS, to another bureau within the Department if not needed within USGS, or to the GSA Interagency Fleet Management System. These transfers will be effected through the headquarters divisional administrative officers and coordinated through the respective headquarters or regional property office. Following are vehicle disposal criteria:

A. One-Time Repair Limit. Except when determined administratively impractical, a vehicle should be replaced in lieu of being repaired when the cost of the repair is expected to exceed the economic value of the vehicle. At a minimum, the following should be applied:

Age of Vehicle One-Time Repair Limit as

(in years) Percentage of Replacement Cost

1 ----------------- 50

2 ----------------- 45

3 ----------------- 40

4 ----------------- 35

5 ----------------- 30

6 ----------------- 25

7 ----------------- 18

8 ----------------- 11

9 ----------------- 5

B. Replacement Standards. Described below are the minimum GSA replacement standards; however, meeting these minimum age and mileage requirements is not sufficient justification in itself to justify sale of a vehicle. The condition of the vehicle must also be a consideration.

Vehicle Type Years Mileage

Sedans/Station Wagons

Gasoline Engines 6 60,000

Diesel Engines 7 70,000

Multiple Drive Vehicles

Less than 12,500 GVWR

Gasoline Engine 6 40,000

Diesel Engine 7 50,000

Trucks (2-wheel drive)

Less than 12,500 GVWR

Gasoline Engine 6 50,000

Diesel Engine 7 60,000

12,500 through 23,999 GVWR

Gasoline Engine 7 60,000

Diesel Engine 8 70,000

24,000 GVWR and over

All 9 80,000

Vehicles that are in usable and workable condition must be retained for use even though the standards permit replacement, provided that the vehicle can be operated for an additional period without excessive maintenance cost or substantial reduction in trade-in value.

C. Disposal Procedures.

(1) Mandatory transfers to GSA Motor Pools. These transfers may be accomplished by a Form 9-064.

(2) Voluntary transfers to GSA Motor Pools. Report as excess following the procedures set forth in Chapter 4.

(3) Exchange/Sale. Generally it is the policy within USGS that motor vehicles are disposed of under the exchange/sale authority as set forth in FPMR 101-46, whenever the vehicle being disposed of will be replaced by another vehicle either by exchange (trade-in), or sale and the proceeds used to acquire a replacement vehicle. If a vehicle is excess to the needs of USGS and is not being replaced, it may be disposed of through the "excess" process, FPMR 101-43.

Advance approval must be obtained from the respective regional property office servicing your region (Headquarters, Menlo Park, or Denver), prior to exchange/sale of a USGS-owned vehicle. The following procedures shall be followed.

(a) When a determination is made by the CPO that a vehicle currently meets the replacement standards, or will meet these standards during the procurement cycle of the replacement vehicle, and the condition is such that the vehicle warrants replacement, he/she shall prepare a Checklist for Vehicle Disposal, Form 9-3006, (Appendix G) and submit that form to the appropriate regional property office for review and approval. The property office will ensure that the vehicle qualifies for replacement.

(b) If the vehicle qualifies for replacement, the property office representative will indicate his/her approval on the checklist and return a copy to the CPO.

(c) A "suspense copy" of the approved "Checklist for Vehicle Disposal" will be maintained by the property office.

(d) The vehicle being traded in (one which meets the replacement criteria) must be referenced on the order (requisition, GSA Form 1781) for the new vehicle. If an eligible vehicle cannot be provided/referenced on the order, the order shall either be held or changed to reflect the new vehicle as an "addition" to the fleet, and must have been included in the annual forecast as such.

(e) Upon receipt of the replacement vehicle, the CPO will immediately forward to the servicing property office a second checklist, "Checklist for Vehicle for Sale," Form 9-1947, Appendix H, along with a "Certificate to Obtain Title to a Vehicle, SF-97 (commonly referred to as the Odometer Disclosure Statement), Appendix I. This checklist is necessary to update the information on the vehicle, such as condition, odometer reading, etc., and provide the property office accurate information for reporting the vehicle to GSA.

(f) When the property office receives the "Checklist for Vehicle for Sale" and the SF 97, it will process the documents for selling the old vehicle. Requests for new vehicle packages (license plates, credit cards, decals, etc.), should be submitted to PMB at least 30 days prior to the shipping date shown on the Motor Vehicle Delivery Order (GSA Form 8002-1). These requests should include the credit card billing account code, the address to which the package should be sent, and the Agency Order Number or assigned vehicle license plate number of the new vehicle.

(g) When a vehicle is being offered for immediate sale, and is not being held awaiting a replacement vehicle, the CPO having jurisdiction over that vehicle should submit to the respective headquarters or regional property office the "Checklist for Vehicle Disposal," "Checklist for Vehicle for Sale," and the Certificate of Release/Odometer Statement (SF 97) simultaneously.

(h) The CPO will be notified by GSA when the vehicle is to be offered for sale. No accessories, tires, etc., may be removed from the vehicle after the "Checklist for Vehicle for Sale" has been submitted to PMB indicating immediate release for sale.

(i) The license plates and decals must be removed from the vehicle and destroyed by the CPO before the vehicle is released to the purchaser.

(j) The National Credit Card issued for this vehicle shall be returned to the Property Management Branch, Mail Stop 210, Reston, Virginia 22092.

(4) Withdrawal of Reported Vehicle. If the CPO wishes to withdraw the vehicle (other than passenger vehicles) from exchange/sale, after a vehicle has been approved and reported to GSA, a request in memorandum form must be submitted through the Headquarters divisional administrative officer to the approving Property office.

Upon receipt of the memorandum, with approvals by the owning Division, the respective Property office may authorize withdrawal.

Vehicles cannot be withdrawn once GSA has made a sale award to or accepted payment from a bidder.

(5) Appearance Reconditioning. In order to maximize the amount of sales proceeds, all vehicles offered for sale shall be appearance reconditioned prior to inspection by prospective buyers in accordance with the Departmental Motor Vehicle Handbook 412 DM 7.4.E.

D. Relief of Accountability. Upon receipt from GSA of an executed "Notice of Award" (GSA Form 27), or "Purchaser's Receipt and Authority to Release Property," the Headquarters Property Management Branch will delete the vehicle from the PMDB, thereby relieving the CPO of accountability.

6. Reports.

A. Monthly Utilization Reporting. The CPO is responsible for ensuring that utilization data is reported for all USGS-owned and commercially leased motor vehicles on a monthly basis, except those owned vehicles which have been offered for sale through the exchange/sale procedures. The CPO must ensure that information is submitted through the bureau Motor Vehicle Management System no earlier than the 2nd workday of the month following the reporting month, and no later than the 10th (or nearest workday to the 10th) of that month. Each month there will be two uploads for corrected data; the first will occur five working days after the initial reporting date, and the second, 10 working days after the initial reporting date.

B. Annual Motor Vehicle Forecast. This report is prepared by the Property Management Branch to ensure that USGS is purchasing the most fuel efficient vehicles possible and that the mpg mandated by law is being met by USGS. Each division provides input of their planned vehicle acquisitions for the fiscal year as a part of the annual forecast.

C. Schedule of Changes in Passenger Vehicle Fleet. Congress mandates that we submit an annual estimate of changes in our passenger vehicle fleet. Each year, when requested by the Director's Office/Assistant Director for Programs, the divisions must provide current year and budget year estimates of the number of passenger vehicles scheduled for acquisition (by purchase and transfer), for disposal (categorized by replacement criteria), and for retention. Copies of each submittal is to be furnished PMB by each division.

D. Quality Deficiency Reports. A Quality Deficiency Report, Standard Form 368, is prepared when a deficiency is found involving a new vehicle or its components, including tires, tubes and batteries. This report is prepared by the CPO for the purpose of (1) reporting non-compliance with specifications or other requirements of the purchase order, (2) providing information to GSA concerning shipment damage, or (3) documenting recurrent problems during the life of the vehicle which could lead to a manufacturer's recall of the vehicle or equipment.

The CPO should send four copies of the completed report to the Property Management Branch, MS 210, Reston, Virginia, for processing.

7. U.S. Government National Credit Cards.

A. General. The U.S. Government National Credit Card, Standard Form 149 (SF 149) is issued by the Property Management Branch for each motor vehicle owned by USGS. Although many of the firms listed in the Vehicle Operator's Guide will accept cash or commercial credit cards as payment for supplies and services, it is USGS policy that the U.S. Government National Credit Card (SF 149) will be used except under extenuating or emergency conditions. CPO's are responsible for the proper use, safeguard and administrative control of the credit cards. Credit cards are also issued on request for other types of fuel-using equipment such as boats, drill rigs and generators. The SF 149 is authorized for use only with the firms listed in the "Government Vehicle Operators Guide to Service Stations for Gasoline, Oil and Lubrication" (Operators Guide). The SF 149 shall not be used for purchasing from any company which is not listed in the Operators Guide.

Government credit cards will only be used for purchases made for the vehicle of the license number embossed on the card.

Credit cards must be safeguarded. Property Management Branch maintains a central registry of credit card assignments within USGS.

Credit cards must be returned to the Property Management Branch or destroyed by mutilating whenever the vehicle is sold or otherwise disposed of, or when replacement tags are issued.

A new credit card will be issued with replacement tags.

(1) The following may be procured with the SF 149:

(a) Regular and premium grade gasoline

(b) Gasohol

(c) Diesel fuel

(d) Regular and premium grade lubricating oil

(e) Lubricating services

(f) Oil filter elements

(g) Air filter services

(h) Mounting and dismounting chains

(i) Permanent type antifreeze

(j) Emergency replacement of defective spark plugs, fan belts, windshield wiper arms and blades, lamps, and other minor emergency repairs

(2) The credit cards are NOT to be used for the following unauthorized purchases:

(a) Seat belts and cushions

(b) Waxes and polishes

(c) Tires, tubes and batteries (except when authorized due to emergency conditions)

(d) Storage and parking

(e) Routine repairs

B. Delivery Ticket/Receipt. It is the responsibility of the vehicle operator to obtain a copy of the credit card purchase receipt for each purchase made, and to verify that all pertinent information is correctly recorded on the ticket prior to signing. The operator should adhere to his division/office policy as to the disposition of the gas ticket/receipt.

C. Self-Service Pumps. USGS vehicle operators (except those physically handicapped) of USGS-owned and USGS-leased motor vehicles shall use self-service pumps whenever such pumps are available.

D. Loss of Credit Card. Losses must be reported in writing promptly to the Property Management Branch. A new card will be issued and the loss will be reported to the GSA contractor.

E. Replacement Credit Cards. Renewals and replacements for damaged cards are obtained through the Headquarters Property Management Branch. PMB coordinates large volume renewal efforts with GSA and the GSA credit card contractor.

F. Billing Account Codes. Requests for revisions to the billing account codes or for additional billing codes shall be submitted through your headquarters division administrative officer to the Property Management Branch for coordination through DOI, GSA, and the GSA credit card contractor.

8. Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Checklist.

At a minimum, safety inspections shall consist of the items set forth in the table below. Deficiencies which impair safety of operations are corrected before returning the vehicle to an operational status.

Item Procedure

Brakes - Test to determine if brakes are functioning properly.

- Check brake pedal as required.

- Remove right front brake drum, inspect for wear or cracking, inspect lining for excessive wear, check wheel cylinder for leaks and deterioration. If excessive wear and/or malfunction is noted, the remaining drums will be removed and completed inspected.

- Check all hydraulic brake lines for leaks and condition. Fill system with fluid.

- On air brake systems, inspect air brake diaphragms and all air lines and air tanks for leaks and deterioration; check air brake instrument controls, air valves, and trailer hoses.

- For disc brakes, inspect discs and pads in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations.

Lights - Check all lights, signals, and reflectors.

- Check condition of trailer jumper cable.

- Check headlights for proper alignment.

Instruments, Controls, - Check all instruments, gauges,

and Warning Devices mirrors, switches, controls, horns, and warning devices for proper functioning.

Exhaust System - Check muffler, exhaust, and tailpipes, and all connections for leaks.

Steering System - Check all steering devices and linkage for wear, alignment, and damage.

Safety Belts - Check all safety belts for wear and proper mounting.

Fifth Wheel, Trailer - Check fifth wheel operation and

King Pin, and Towing safety lock. Check trailer king pin

Attachment for wear damage. Check tow bars, tongue socket, attachments, and safety chain.

Tires - Check all tires for damage and excess wear. Check wheel lug nuts for tightness.

Windshield Wipers - Check for proper operation, wear,

and Washers damage, and deterioration, as appropriate.

Exhaust Emission - Check exhaust emissions for

Controls compliance with local restrictions.

Exhaust Controls - Check for the presence of, or damage

Tampering Check to, the catalytic converter, fuel filter inlet restrictor, exhaust gas recirculation valve, air pump, air pump drive belt, and other pollution control devices which are readily visible. Check also for plugged or disconnected vacuum lines.

Window Glass - Check for cracks.

License Plates - Ensure they are firmly attached and that rear plate is illuminated.

Spare Tire - Check for presence of tire and tool to change.

Appendices A through I are not available here. See printed handbook.


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U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA, USA
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/usgs-manual/handbook/hb/408-2-h.html
Contact: APS, Office of Policy and Analysis
Content Information Contact: jomargaret_hale@usgs.gov
Last modification: 11-Jan-2013@10:37 (kk)
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