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Briefing Series

Our Congressional Briefing Series began in 1999, in order to increase Congressional awareness of the role and relevance of our science in the public policy debate and to ensure that science is at the table when Congress is making decisions. Explore presentations, biographies of speakers, partner and sponsor websites, and other information for each briefing. 

Filter Total Items: 19

ShakeAlert: the Earthquake Early Warning System for the West Coast of the United States

 

Large, damaging earthquakes will happen. The U.S. loses over $6 billion annually from earthquakes, according to FEMA, and about three-quarters of that is in California, Oregon, and Washington. ShakeAlert will be an innovative technology that will make communitie

Gravity ​Never ​Sleeps: Landslide ​Risk ​Across ​the ​Country

Speakers​ ​will​ ​discuss​ ​landslide​ ​hazards,​ ​the​ ​science,​ ​and​ ​emergency management.​ ​Learn​ ​about​ ​real-life​ ​situations,​ ​including​ ​observations from​ ​Puerto​ ​Rico,​ ​and​ ​how​ ​science​ ​helps​ ​decision-makers​ ​reduce losses​ ​and​ ​respond​ ​to​ ​the​ ​threat.

Bats Help Grow the Agricultural Economy

The U.S. Geological Survey invites you to join us for a congressional briefing during Bat Week (Oct. 24 – 31). Come hear from farmers, scientists, and land managers working on the front lines about the risks bats face as well as the many ways that bats help to naturally grow the agricultural economy.

Focus on Flooding

Speakers will share stories from Irma, Harvey and other intense storms, during a panel. 

Science for Agriculture

Earth science is the foundation of many industries, including the Nation’s most important one—– agriculture. Come learn about the variety of ways in which earth science informs agriculture, and hear from stakeholders who rely on USGS science to make informed decisions in their fields.

Expanding the Nation's Groundwater Resource: How a new USGS report could help quench a nation's growing thirst for water

The USGS's new report is the first comprehensive national assessment since 1965 of brackish groundwater, which is slightly salty and underlies most of the country. The report provides maps and data that can assist water infrastructure decision makers determine the viability of using this substantial resource for drinking water, irrigation, and mining, among many other uses. 

Unfriendly Blooms: How Harmful Algal Blooms Threaten Life and the Economy

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been reported in every State and are increasingly affecting coastal, Great Lakes, and inland communities and economies. 

Understanding the Disease - Science in Support of One Health

Seven out of ten emerging human diseases originate in wildlife or domestic animals. Scientists are therefore advancing a concept of integrated wildlife, domestic animal, human and environmental health—One Health.

Linking Earth Sciences and Health

Seven out of ten emerging human diseases originate in wildlife or domestic animals. Scientists are therefore advancing a concept of integrated wildlife, domestic animal, human and environmental health—One Health.

Using Every Drop of Information: the Open Water Data Initiative

In many places, America’s water resources are being stressed by increasing demand for water, decreasing water supplies, and reduced water quality. Large areas of the country are vulnerable to both droughts and floods. These stresses can be heightened by changes in land use, population growth, and climate change.

#StrongAfterSandy—The Science Supporting the Department of the Interior’s Response

Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 devastated some of the most densely populated areas of the Atlantic Coast. The storm claimed lives, altered natural lands and wildlife habitat, and caused millions of dollars in property damage. Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of our Nation's need to better protect people and communities from future storms.

Safer Communities, Stronger Economies – in 3D

Outdated and inconsistent elevation data cost lives and hinder prosperity across our Nation. Current and precise 3D elevation data are essential to help communities cope with natural hazards, support infrastructure, ensure agricultural success, strengthen environmental decision making and bolster national security.