Science Support

445-2-H, Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements

Prepared by: Office of Administration, Office of Management Services, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch

Disclaimer: Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U. S. Government.­­­­

 

Table of Contents

Foreword

Handbook Concurrence

Chapter 1 - Purpose, Authority, and Policy

Chapter 2 - Responsibilities

Chapter 3 - Annual Action Plans and Status Reports

Chapter 4 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards, Procedures, and Guidelines

Chapter 5 - Program Evaluations and Policy Self Assessments

Chapter 6 - Inspections and Abatement

Chapter 7 - Accident/Incident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation

Chapter 8 - Employee Reports of Unsafe Conditions and Allegations of Reprisal

Chapter 9 - Occupational Safety and Health Councils, Committees, and Working Groups

Chapter 10 - Occupational Safety and Health Program Awards

Chapter 11 - Staffing Safety and Health Positions

Chapter 12 - Professional Development

Chapter 13 - Collateral Duty Safety and Occupational Health Program Coordinator

Chapter 14 - Safety and Health Training

Chapter 15 - Job Hazard Analyses

Chapter 16 - Motor Vehicle Safety

Chapter 17 - Work Zone Safety

Chapter 18 - Respiratory Protection Program

Chapter 19 - Hearing Conservation Program

Chapter 20 - Hazard Communication Protection Program

Chapter 21 - Laboratory Protection Program

Chapter 22 - Formaldehyde Control Program

Chapter 23 - Medical Surveillance

Chapter 24 - Occupational Medicine - Prevention of Zoonotic and Vector-Borne Diseases in the Field

Chapter 25 - Occupational Industrial Hygiene – Human Bloodborne Pathogens Protection Program

Chapter 26 - Personal Protective Equipment

Chapter 27 - Aviation Safety

Chapter 28 - Underwater Diving Safety

Chapter 29 - Firearms Safety Program

Chapter 30 - Ionizing Radiation

Chapter 31 - Watercraft Safety

Chapter 32 - Reserved for future content

Chapter 33 - Contractor Safety and Health

Chapter 34 - Off-the-Job Safety and Health

Chapter 35 - Public Safety and Health

Chapter 36 - Fire Safety

Chapter 37 - Lock Out/Tag Out Program

Chapter 38 - Blasting Safety

Chapter 39 - Wildlife Netting Safety

Chapter 40 - Confined Spaces

Chapter 41 - Cableway Safety

Chapter 42 - Electrofishing Safety

Chapter 43 - Ergonomics

Chapter 44 - Fall Protection Program

Chapter 45 - The Management of Occupational Heat Stress

Chapter 46 - Bear Spray Safety Program

Chapter 47 - Reserved for future content

Chapter 48 - Prevention of Cold Stress Injuries

Chapter 49 - Large Vessel Safety Management Program

Chapter 50 - Non-ionizing Radiation

Chapter 51 - Industrial Hygiene Program

Chapter 52 - Youth Safety

Chapter 53 - Reserved for future content

Chapter 54 - Glossary of Terms and Acronyms

 

 

 CHAPTER 1

Purpose, Authority and Policy

Instruction:  Changes to this chapter were made to reflect changes made to the organizational structure during Bureau realignment.

 

1.  Purpose.  To set forth the policy for the implementation and administration of the Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) for the U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS).

 

2.  Authority.

A.  Public Law 91-596, Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Sections 6 and 19.

B.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  Title 29 CFR Part 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters.

D. 43 U.S. Code Section 1457 (refers to public safety).

 

3.  Policy.  It is the policy of the USGS to:

A.  Provide safe and healthful working conditions to protect personnel and the visiting public from injuries/illnesses and property from accidental damage.

B.  Include occupational safety and health as an integral part of every operation.

C.  Hold managers and supervisors accountable and provide them recognition for implementation and management of the Program within their scope of authority and responsibility.

D.  Establish and maintain a staff of occupational safety and health professionals and collateral-duty safety program coordinators at appropriate levels within the organization to advise management in the development and implementation of an effective occupational safety and health program.

E.  Require that no personnel be subjected to restraint, interference, coercion, discrimination, or reprisal for filing a report of an alleged unsafe or unhealthful working condition or for otherwise participating in the Program.

F.  Provide personnel with the supervision, knowledge, and skills necessary to safely perform their assigned tasks.

G.  Require personnel and supervisors to identify and correct unsafe and unhealthful conditions and to know and follow safe and healthful work rules and practices.

H.  Use occupational safety and health committees, where appropriate, to enhance the Program.  (See SM 445-2-H.9.)

I.  Comply with applicable Program requirements of Executive Order 12196, 29 CFR 1960, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and adopted national consensus standards.

J.  Promote off-the-job safety and health of personnel through on-the-job safety and health activities.

K.  Incorporate and enforce appropriate safety and health performance clause(s) in contracts with concessionaires and contractors.

L.  In addition to Department of the Interior Manual 352 and 485 chapter requirements and general referenced requirements in paragraph 1 above, it is the USGS policy to additionally comply with the following program elements:

(1)  Organizational Policies and Administration.  Develops organizational policy, plans, programs, directives, and rules and interpretation of occupational safety and health policy and procedures to include management and personnel accountability; the establishment of councils, committees, and working groups that address occupational safety and health issues; and the designation of appropriate personnel and financial resources for program implementation.

(2)  Standards.  Ensures personnel awareness of and accessibility to applicable policy, documents, codes, regulations, and program standards.

(3)  Occupational Safety and Health Program Evaluations and Program Planning.  Evaluates program elements annually, inclusive of personal and financial resources, for the purpose of providing management with information on program effort and effectiveness and establishing short and long-term goals for program enhancement and implementation.

(4)  Inspections.  Conducts operational and facility surveys, inspections, evaluations, and staff visits for the purpose of identifying hazards within the workplace and determining the level of organizational compliance with standards.

(5)  Hazard Identification and Abatement.  Reports and corrects unsafe and unhealthful working conditions and identifies/corrects workplace hazards through job hazard analysis.

(6)  Accident/Incident Investigation, Reporting, and Analysis.  Investigates, reports, and analyzes accidents, providing recommended corrective actions and tracking corrective measures through abatement to prevent recurrence.

(7)  Training.  Identifies, develops, coordinates, schedules, and conducts required training for target audiences and professional development of personnel.

(8)  Promotion and Awareness.  Develops Standard and Regulatory compliance assistance, awards, and recognition programs; develops safety and health promotion/awareness plans.

(9)  Industrial Hygiene/Occupational Medicine.  Includes hearing conservation, respiratory protection, exposure assessments, personal protective equipment, and laboratory safety.

(10)  Fire Protection, Prevention, and Response.  Ensures USGS facilities and operations are compliant with established fire safety practices and policies.

(11)  Motor Vehicles and Motorized Equipment.  Ensures that operators of motorized vehicles are identified and trained and that equipment is maintained in safe working condition.

(12)  Contractor, Concessionaire, Volunteer, and Public Safety.  Provides equivalent safety protections for subject personnel.

(13)  Specialized Program Assistance/Coordination.  Includes aviation, firearms, diving, large vessels, and watercraft activities.

(14)  High Hazard Operations.  Includes radiation safety, blasting safety, confined space entry, electrofishing, rocket netting operations, electrical safety, and field safety.

 

 

/s/ Katherine McCulloch __________________________               9/14/2014____

Katherine McCulloch                                                                           Date

Acting Deputy Associate Director for Administration

 

 

 CHAPTER 2

Responsibilities

Instruction: Chapter is revised to reflect a change in the Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch program responsibilities.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for the implementation of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) occupational safety and health program.

 

2.  Director.

A.  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and OSH Program criteria.

B.  Provides management direction and support necessary to effectively fulfill OSH Program requirements.

C.  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling OSH Program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office.

D.  Supplements the OSH Program with special initiatives, directives, standards, and criteria to meet the occupational safety and health needs of the USGS.

E.  Demonstrates personal commitment for the occupational safety and health of employees, contractors, concessionaires, volunteers, and visitors.

F.  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the OSH Program.

G.  Provides adequate staff and funding resources to ensure effective implementation and administration of the OSH Program. (Reference 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1960.7.)

H.  Requires annual OSH Program local office self-inspections and external compliance inspections of regional and mission area offices based on high risk activities, high accident rates, occupational hazards, past OSH Program history, personnel turnover, and time lapse since the last formal review.  Requires internal control OSH Program evaluations for each Associate and Regional Director’s OSH Program at least once every 3 years.

I.  Requires that OSH Program reviews and inspection deficiencies are documented and abated.

J.  Requires that accidents are reported and investigated in accordance with SM 445-2-H.7, Incident/Accident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation.

K.  Recognizes employees for outstanding occupational safety and health performance.

L.  Requires the DASHO to submit an annual Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) report summarizing the OSH Program to the Department of Interior (DOI).

M.  Completes the OSH Program policy annual self-assessment as the Director within the DOI Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

 

3.  Deputy Director.  Serves as the USGS representative on the DOI Office of Aviation Services Executive Aviation Board.

 

4.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

A.  Provide adequate staff and funding resources to effectively implement and administer the Program within their respective region, mission area or office. (Reference 29 CFR 1960.7.)

B.  Associate Directors appoint a mission area OSH representative.  Regional Directors appoint regional occupational safety and health professionals (meeting Office of Personnel Management (OPM) qualifications for GS-018/690/803) and provide resources and support for the effective implementation and administration of the OSH Program. Coordinate with the OSH Program Manager to review applications for full-time occupational safety and health vacancies.

C.  Require compliance with statutory, regulatory, and OSH Program criteria and hold managers and supervisors accountable for effectively fulfilling OSH Program responsibilities.

D.  Supplement the OSH Program with special initiatives, directives, standards, and training to meet occupational safety and health requirements.

E.  Demonstrate personal commitment for the occupational safety and health of employees, contractors, concessionaires, volunteers, and visitors.

F.  Delegate sufficient authority to effectively represent the interests of the Director in the management and administration of the OSH Program.

G.  Require formal external compliance inspections of facilities and offices based on high risk activities, high accident rates, occupational hazards, past OSH Program history, personnel turnover, time lapse since the last external review, and similar criteria.

H.  Require that annual occupational safety and health self-inspections be conducted and documented within the DOI IAS for all facilities and offices.  Require that OSH Program and inspection deficiencies and corrective actions be documented and tracked through resolution in the DOI IAS.

I.  Require that accidents are reported and investigated in accordance with SM 445-2-H.7, Incident/Accident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation.

J.  Provide copies of the OSHA Executive Order (EO) 12196, 29 CFR 1960, and OSH Program documentation to managers and supervisors.

K.  Recognize employees for outstanding occupational safety and health performance.

L.  Require that the occupational safety and health poster (Appendix A) be posted in all offices and facilities.

M.  Complete an annual OSH Program policy self-assessment as the Associate or Regional Director within the DOI IAS.

 

5.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official/Associate Director for Administration.

A.  Serves as the USGS representative on the DOI Office of Aviation Services Executive Aviation Committee.

B.  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage the OSH Program.

C.  Directs OSH Program activities, through the Chief, Office of Management Services (OMS), and ensures that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to develop and administer the OSH Program.

D.  Designates a qualified safety professional meeting OPM qualification standards for the GS-018/690/803 series to serve as a subject-matter expert to review applications for full-time position vacancies.

E.  Advises the Director and Executive Leadership Team (ELT) on the status of the OSH Program.

F.  Represents USGS OSH interests through participation in the DOI DASHO Council.

G.  Participates in the Federal Advisory Council on Occupational Safety and Health, upon request.

H.  Appoints serious accident investigation teams or trained investigators for the investigation of serious accidents.

I.  Submits an annual Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) report summarizing the OSH Program to the Department of Interior (DOI).

J.  Promotes and supports the OSH Council as a forum to exchange OSH Program information and to coordinate occupational safety and health activities. (Reference SM 445-2-H.9, OSH Councils, Committees, and Working Groups.)

K.  Completes an annual OSH Program policy self-assessment as the DASHO within the DOI IAS.

 

6.  Chief, Office of Management Services (OMS).

A.  Supervises the OSH Program Manager and provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management and administration of the OSH Program.

B.  Assists the DASHO in representing OSH Program interests.  Participates in the DOI OSH Council or working groups upon request by the DASHO and co-chairs the USGS OSH Council.

C.  Supplements the OSH Program with special initiatives and directives to meet occupational safety and health needs.

D.  Demonstrates management commitment for the occupational safety and health of employees, contractors, concessionaires, volunteers, and visitors.

E.  Completes an annual OSH Program policy self-assessment as the OMS Chief within the DOI IAS.

F.  Recognizes employees for outstanding occupational safety and health performance.

 

7.  Chief/Deputy/Section Chiefs, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch.

A.  Administers the OSH Program and provides OSH Program oversight and coordination for OSH Program components and elements listed in 2.7V.  Advises and supports management in carrying out OSH Program responsibilities.

B.  Develops OSH program policies, directives, and alternate or supplemental standards and guidelines to meet employee, contractor, concessionaire, volunteer safety and health requirements.  Interprets OSHA, adopted national consensus standards, and DOI occupational safety and health policies.

C.  Participates on the DOI OSH Council and other occupational safety and health councils, committees, and work groups.  Serves as the USGS representative to OSHA, National Fire Protection Association, and other agencies on the OSH Program.

D.  Evaluates OSH staffing levels and plans to determine effectiveness in establishing and implementing the OSH Program.

E.  Receives requests from the field for variances.  Drafts and submits requests for variances to OSHA regulations or changes to DOI OSH policies to the DOI Office of Occupational Health and Safety.

F.  Ensures that allegations of reprisal, reports of unsafe and unhealthful conditions, and accidents/incidents are investigated and coordinated with Regional Safety Managers or Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) for resolution.

G.  Provides direction and oversight for the Industrial Hygiene Program.

H.  Provides direction and oversight for the Aviation, Dive, Firearms, Large Vessel, and Watercraft Specialized Safety Programs.

I.  Provides direction and oversight for the Radiation Safety Program implementation and oversees ionizing and non-ionizing radiation safety.

J.  Coordinates with the Office of Human Resources and the Department of Labor, Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs on medical surveillance.

K.  Provides direction and oversight for the occupational safety and health training and professional development programs and policy which includes the identification of training resources, the development of training plans and/or facilitating the conduct of general/specialized occupational safety and health instruction.

L.  Serves as the DASHO subject matter expert to review applicants for all full-time safety and health position vacancies.  This responsibility may be delegated by the OSH Program Manager provided the designee is at a grade level equal to or higher than that of the vacancy.

M.  Establishes investigations of serious accidents to ensure that accidents are reported and investigated in accordance with SM 445-2-H.7, Incident/Accident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation.

N.  Coordinates the use of the DOI Safety Management Information System (SMIS) for collecting accident data and analyzing accidents (employee, contractor, or visitor) involving injuries, illnesses, and property damage related to USGS operations.  Ensures review of accident/incident information to determine accuracy and completeness.  Takes appropriate action to correct inaccurate reporting.

O.  Distributes accident, auditing, and statistical reports and recommendations for prevention of future incidents.

P.  Coordinates the administration of the DOI IAS and the collection and analysis of inspection and program assessment compliance data. (Reference SM 445-2-H.6.)  Completes an annual occupational safety and health policy self-assessment within the DOI IAS. (Reference SM 445-2-H.5.)

Q.  Ensures that OSH Program internal control evaluations of regions, mission areas, and offices including a sampling of field locations are conducted every 3 years.

R.  Requires that local occupational safety and health self-inspections are conducted annually as required by 29 CFR 1960.25(c).  Coordinates with Regional Safety Managers and CDSPCs to schedule within IAS all formal program evaluations and external facility inspections based on high hazard activities, high accident rates, or program and performance deficiencies.  Requires that inspection deficiencies and recommended corrective actions are documented and tracked within the DOI IAS through resolution.

S.  Submits an annual OSHA summary report to the DOI Office of Occupational Health and Safety.

T.  Facilitates establishment of contracts associated with occupational safety and health, industrial hygiene, information resources management, and fire protection engineering as needed.

U.  Ensures that a safety-promotion program is established that is aimed at providing information to region, mission area, and office personnel.  Provides and/or recommends safety training materials, journals, reference documents, posters, signs, etc.

V.  Provides direct support to mission areas and general guidance to regions in the accordance with the components and elements in the USGS Occupational Safety and Health Guide for Program Evaluations and Policy Self Assessments:

(1) Management and Leadership.

(2) Employee Involvement.

(3) Hazard Recognition and Prevention.

(4) Evaluation and Analysis.

(5) Training and Awareness.

(6) Program Implementation and Operation.

W.  Provide specialized safety program oversight, administration, budget coordination and supervision of the Specialized Safety Program Managers (Aviation, Dive, Firearms, Large Vessels and Watercraft).

(1)  Manages specialized safety activities within the USGS. Assess risk and provide guidance for the implementation of Department and Survey Manual requirements.  Disseminate specialized safety program policy and information bureau-wide.  Develop and facilitate the implementation of minimum specialized safety standards and guidelines to ensure consistent safe practices.

(2)  Establishes specialized program goals and develops annual program plans and accomplishments.

(3)  Assesses the effectiveness of specialized safety programs inclusive of costs and budget to ensure that program and management oversight activities comply with DOI and USGS objectives.  Promote management involvement by identifying specialized program compliance issues and recommended corrective actions.

(4)  Reviews interagency requirements for specialized safety activities and implements management, operational principles, and agreements, commensurate with USGS involvement in interagency and cooperator functions.

(5)  Develops and/or reviews proposed DOI specialized safety policies, procedures, and business management practices and coordinates USGS input.  Review and evaluate specialized safety program legislation for its impact on operations and develop recommendations for implementing compliance programs.

(6)  Facilitates compliance with DOI safety training requirements.  Monitor specialized safety user training to ensure compliance, completion, and overall quality.  Approve instructor training as needed.  Evaluate, recommend, and improve training techniques and required safety equipment for use in field situations.

(7)  Serves as the USGS representative on various DOI subcommittees related to specialized safety programs.  Serve as advisors to the DASHO and OSH Program Manager through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council.  Chair specialized safety program committees and establish work groups.

(8)  Administers and/or develops information systems to assist in managing specialized safety programs.

(9)  Reviews and/or conducts specialized program accident/incident investigations and manage specialized accident prevention programs.

(10)  Administers specialized safety awards programs.

(11)  Conducts external inspections of region and mission area specialized safety programs, as appropriate.

(12)  Completes annual OSH Program policy self-assessments in the DOI IAS.

(13)  Coordinates with organizational components to facilitate implementation of medical standards and surveillance programs as applicable.

(14)  Provides support, oversight, and supervision for specialized safety staff that support regions and mission areas.

X.  Manages policies related to Aviation, Dive, Firearms, Large Vessel and Watercraft requirements, standards, and requirements.

Y.  Administers DOI SMIS/IAS and safety training management systems.

Z.  Identifies and assesses potential health risks of employee workplace exposures to chemical, biological, and physical agents.

AA.  Develops industrial hygiene policy, direction, guidance, and protocols.

BB.  Establishes industrial hygiene program goals, objectives, and initiatives.

CC.  Develops core competencies and training requirements for industrial hygienists.

DD.  Provides industrial hygiene support to regions, mission areas, and offices.

EE.  Completes annual OSH Program policy self-assessments in the DOI IAS.

FF.  Administers the OSH Program for the mission areas and offices.

GG.  Advises and supports management in mission areas and offices in implementation and compliance with OSH Program responsibilities.

HH.  Serves as an advisor to the DASHO and OSH Program Manager through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council.

II.  Coordinates and assists CDSPCs and OSH representatives in documenting annual self-conducted compliance inspections for mission areas and offices.

JJ.  Conducts formal external inspections of mission areas and offices and their facilities based on high hazard, high accident rates, or programmatic deficiencies and documents recommendations for corrective actions to correct deficiencies in the DOI IAS.

KK.  Coordinates external OSH inspection scheduling with the OSH Program Manager.

LL.  Tracks corrective actions for mission areas and offices through resolution.

MM.  Ensures that allegations of reprisal, reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions, and accidents/incidents from mission areas and offices are investigated. Reviews reports of allegation of reprisal investigations that were not resolved at the field level and provides recommendations to management for resolution. Forwards unresolved reports to the OSH Program Manager for resolution.

NN.  Coordinates the use of SMIS to support the needs of mission areas and offices for collecting, and analyzing accident data involving injuries, illnesses, and property damage.  Reviews accident/incident information in SMIS to verify accuracy/completeness and ensures that appropriate action is taken to correct deficiencies and prevent recurrence.

OO.  Analyzes mission area and office accidents and provides periodic reports detailing trends and recommendations for prevention to the Associate and Regional Directors or local management.

PP.  Coordinates with local CDSPCs to identify training resources and to develop and conduct occupational safety and health training to meet mission area and office needs.

QQ.  Develops and maintains OSH promotional programs to provide information to specific mission area and office target audiences, to include safety training materials, journals, reference documents, posters, signs.  Participates in awareness and promotional programs in coordination with the OSH Program Manager.

RR.  Provides assistance to mission area and Regional office management, CDSPCs, and OSH representatives in the implementation and compliance with the OSH Program components and elements listed in paragraph 7.V above.

SS.  Oversees the ionizing radiation program.

 

8.  Regional Safety Managers.

A.  Administer the OSH Program for their respective regional locations.

B.  Advise and supports regional management in implementation and compliance with OSH Program responsibilities.

C.  Participate on the OSH Council and work groups to provide insight into field science programs, problems, or issues.

D.  Coordinate and assists CDSPCs with documenting annual self-conducted compliance inspections at local field sites.

E.  Conduct formal external inspections of science centers and their facilities based on high hazard, high accident rates, or programmatic deficiencies and document recommendations for corrective actions to correct deficiencies in the DOI IAS.

F.  Coordinate external OSH inspection scheduling with the OSH Program Manager or designee and local science center staff.

G.  Track local science center corrective actions through resolution.

H.  Complete an annual OSH Program policy self-assessment in the DOI IAS.

I.  Evaluate region and science center occupational safety and health staffing levels and effectiveness in implementing the OSH Program, makes recommendations to the Regional Director as appropriate.

J.  Submit requests for variances from OSHA regulations and OSH standards, and changes to OSH Program policies to the OSH Program Manager.

K.  Ensure that regional allegations of reprisal, reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions, and accidents/incidents are investigated.  Review reports of allegation of reprisal investigations that were not resolved at the field level and provide recommendations to management for resolution. Forward unresolved reports to the OSH Program Manager for resolution.

L.  Recommend new OSH Program policies, directives, and guidelines to the OSH Program Manager or OSH Council.

M.  Coordinate regional OSH Program implementation and compliance with OSHA, national consensus standards, DOI, and USGS OSH Program policies.

N.  Facilitate establishment of contracts associated with occupational safety and health, industrial hygiene, information resources management, and fire protection engineering as needed.

O.  Coordinate with local CDSPCs to identify training resources and to develop and conduct occupational safety and health training to meet regional needs.

P.  Coordinate the development and maintenance of regional OSH promotional programs to provide information to specific region and field target audiences, to include safety training materials, journals, reference documents, posters, signs.  Participate in awareness and promotional programs in coordination with the OSH Program Manager.

Q.  Provide assistance to regional management and CDSPCs in the implementation and compliance with the OSH Program components and elements listed in paragraph 2.7V.

R.  Coordinate the use of SMIS to support regional needs for collecting, and analyzing accident data involving injuries, illnesses, and property damage.  Review regional accident/incident information in SMIS to verify accuracy/completeness and ensure that appropriate action is taken to correct deficiencies and prevent recurrence.

S.  analyze regional accidents and provide periodic reports detailing trends and recommendations for prevention to regional and local field management.

 

9.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

A.  Demonstrate personal commitment for the occupational safety and health of employees, contractors, concessionaires, volunteers, and visitors.

B.  Implement OSH Program requirements within the scope of authority.

C.  Appoint appropriate resources to provide services to field managers, supervisors, and employees and to implement OSH Programs within their respective organizations.

D.  Coordinate application review with the OSH Program Manager for full-time occupational safety and health vacancies meeting OPM qualifications for GS-018/690/803. (Reference 29 CFR 1960.7.)

E.  Provide appropriate occupational safety and health training for employees.

F.  Inspect operations for hazardous activities and conditions and documents deficiencies in IAS. Eliminate deficiencies as soon as possible.

G.  Ensure that employees use personal protective equipment as necessary to prevent injury, property damage, or occupational diseases

H.  Report and investigate job-related accidents that result in or have the potential to cause injury, illness, or property damage.  Verifies that accidents are reported in SMIS.

I.  Report all serious accidents to the Regional Safety Manager or OSH Program Manager within four (4) hours of occurrence.  Coordinate with the OSH Program Manager to facilitate Serious Accident Investigation investigations.

J.  Hold employees accountable for safe work habits through employee performance standards.

K.  Ensure that employees are aware of their rights under the 29 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1960.

(1)  Section 11 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act protects the right of employees to refuse dangerous work without fearing retaliation.  The right to refuse to do a task is protected if all of the following conditions are met:

(a)  Where possible, the employee has asked the supervisor to eliminate the danger, and the supervisor failed to do so.

(b)  The employee refused to work in "good faith."  This means that the employee must genuinely believe that an imminent danger exists.

(c)  A reasonable person would agree that there is a real danger of death or serious injury.

(d)  There is not enough time, due to the urgency of the hazard, to have it corrected through regular enforcement channels, such as requesting for an inspection by the safety staff or by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

L.  Ensure that employees are able to participate in the OSH Program and that no employee is subjected to restraint, interference, coercion, discrimination, or reprisal by virtue of submitting an oral or formal written report within the organization or to higher levels of authority.

M.  Require integration of occupational safety and health practices into the job through the use of job hazard analyses. (Reference SM 445-2-H.15, Job Hazard Analyses.)

N.  Ensure that annual self-conducted inspections of all local facilities are performed in accordance with 29 CFR 1960.25(c) and documented within the DOI IAS.  Review inspection findings to ensure that abatement actions for deficiencies are appropriately addressed.

O.  Ensure the implementation of the OSH Program components and elements listed in paragraph 2.7V as applicable.

P.  Implement contract activities in compliance with SM 445-2-H.33, Contractor Safety and Health.

Q.  Establish and document a safety awareness program to reinforce safety concepts and goals using one or more of the following methods:

(1)  Establishing local safety committees (required for cost centers with over 20 employees).

(2) Engaging in dialog with employees to raise and maintain safety awareness.

(3)  Encouraging and supporting formal or informal training sessions.

(4)  Holding pre- or post-field trip meetings with individuals or groups.

(5)  Holding all-employee meetings.

(6)  Communicating with employees through email and/or performance reviews.

R.  Require that the occupational safety and health poster (Appendix A) be posted in all offices and facilities under their authority, inclusive of accurate contact information.

S.  Ensure the implementation of occupational safety and health responsibilities by employees who are permanently or temporarily assigned to from another cost center or location. (Reference Appendix B, Cross-Office Safety and Health Responsibilities.)

T.  Appoint Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

 

10.  Employees.

A.  Comply with work rules and procedures including the use of provided safety equipment.

B.  Report unsafe and/or unhealthful working conditions in accordance with SM 445-2-H.8.

C.  Exercise OSH Program rights and responsibilities without fear of restraint, interference, coercion, discrimination, or reprisal for reporting an unsafe or unhealthful condition, or otherwise participating in the OSH Program.

D.  Actively participate in occupational safety and health education and training activities.

E.  Report to supervisors job-related accidents or incidents that result in, or have the potential to cause, injury, illness, or property damage and any physical or mental condition that adversely affects the ability to perform a job in a safe and healthful manner.

 

11.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

A.  Facilitate formal annual self-inspections of facilities and field sites to identify/investigate hazards and unsafe or unhealthful conditions.

B.  Assist local management and employees with establishing a local occupational safety and health program and compliance with occupational safety and health rules and regulations.

C.  Serve as OSH Program advisors to local management.  Participate in occupational safety and health councils or committees, and subordinate work groups.

D.  Coordinate local OSH Program activities.

E.  Assist in reviewing drafts of OSH Program guidelines and other documentation and in conducting research on occupational safety and health issues.

 

12.  Occupational Safety Council, Committees, and Work Groups.

A.  The OSH Council serves as an advisory body to the DASHO and the ELT on OSH Program matters.

B.  Specialized Safety Program Committees serve as advisory bodies to the DASHO and the OSH Council.

C.  Committees in field locations serve as advisory bodies to local management.

D.  All councils and committees coordinate program activities and exchanging information.  Activities provide a channel for communication between employees and management to assist in providing a safe and healthful workplace, encourage employees to comply with pertinent occupational safety and health requirements, and practice safe procedures during off-duty hours.

E.  Work groups may be established by the OSH Council, Specialized Program Committees, and field organizations, to address specific OSH Program, operational, or location issues.

Appendix 2-A: Occupational Safety and Health Protection for Employees of the U.S. Geological Survey

 

Appendix 2-B: Cross-Office Safety and Health Responsibilities

 

 

/s/ Jose R.Aragon                                                                    June 21, 2016

___________________________________________          ___________________

Jose R. Aragon                                                                        Date                                       

Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 3

Annual Action Plans and Status Reports

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to address organizational changes and to address requirements for annual action plans and status reports.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for the development and submission of OSH Program annual reports and action plans to accomplish the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) missions.   

 

2.  Authority/References.

A.  Executive Order 12196  Section 1-201 (l).

B.  29 CFR 1960.71 Agency Annual Reports.

C.  SM 445-2-H, Chapter 5, Program Evaluations.

D.  SM 445-2-H, Chapter 6, Inspections and Abatement.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  Annual Action Plans

(1)  Each Associate Director (AD) and Regional Director (RD) shall develop an annual action plan within the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS) for the enhancement of OSH Program performance for the upcoming fiscal year.  Initiatives should be specific, address common open inspection findings and program deficiencies, and linked to OSH Program goals and objectives with responsibility for implementation clearly identified. 

(2)  The plans shall be generated after completing the policy self-assessment(s), as described within SM 445-2-H, Chapter 5, OSH Program Evaluations. 

(3)  Closed initiatives within the current fiscal year action plan are considered annual OSH Program accomplishments.

(4)  Consolidated AD, RD, and OSH Management Branch (OSHMB) action plans serve as the USGS action plan.

B.  Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Report.

(1)  The OSH Program Manager shall compile an OSHA Report following the Department of the Interior (DOI) prescribed format.

(2)  The Action Plan shall be integrated into the annual OSHA Report as applicable. 

(3)  The Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO) shall forward the OSHA Report to the DOI DASHO in March of each calendar year.
 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs annual action plan and status report activities through the DASHO, who, for the USGS, is the Associate Director for Administration.

B.  Associate and Regional Directors.  Ensure that an organizational annual action plan is developed by the end of August of each fiscal year and documented within IAS to facilitate continuous improvement from year to year.  Action plans should be communicated to organizational supervision and employees. 

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.  Forwards the annual OSHA Report to the DOI DASHO in March of each fiscal year.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Assigns annual action plan and status report responsibilities to the OSH Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  OSH Program Manager.

(1)  Reviews IAS reports to identify noncompliance findings and (or) deficiencies that are common throughout the USGS and establishes initiatives to facilitate continuous improvement and OSH Program improvement.

(2)  Ensures that OSHMB and Specialized Safety Program annual OSH action plans are developed by the end of June each fiscal year and documented within IAS to facilitate continuous improvement from year to year. 

(3)  Consolidates OSHMB, specialized safety, and regional action plans into an OSH Program annual plan and integrates into the annual DOI OSHA Report.

(4)  Submits, during the second quarter of each calendar year, an annual report to the DOI Office of Occupational Health and Safety.  The report includes program plans, performance metrics, and USGS activities.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Review IAS reports to identify noncompliance findings and (or) deficiencies that are common throughout the region and ensure that an annual action plan is developed by the end of August of each fiscal year and documented within IAS to facilitate continuous improvement from year to year. 

(2)  Communicate the annual action plan to organizational supervisors and employees and post on organizational Web sites.

(3)  Upon request, provide information that describes the overall effectiveness of each organization’s OSH Program, reference inspections and program evaluations conducted, and detail accomplishments and plans during the year.

G.  Science and Cost Center Directors/Supervisors.  Ensure that local self-inspections are completed annually and findings addressed as appropriate.Hazard abatement logs resulting from local self-inspections within IAS serve as the Annual Action Plan for local field organizations.

H.  Science Center Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Coordinate with local staff to conduct and document annual self-inspections within IAS. 
 

 

/s/ Katherine McCulloch for                                                                       September 1, 2015
______________________________________________                        _______________
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                            Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 4

Occupational Safety and Health Standards, Procedures, and Guidelines

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to remove environmental standards and guidance and to include additional safety and health standards and guidance.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for the development and adoption of occupational safety and health standards, guidelines, and procedures.

 

2.  References.

A.  Public Law 91-596, Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

B.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1960.

D.  Public Buildings Act of 1959 as amended, Section 21, Compliance with Nationally Recognized Codes.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will comply with the Department of the Interior (DOI),

Occupational Safety and Health Administration, other Federal agency, Executive Order 12196, and adopted national consensus standards.  If conflicts exist among these standards, the most appropriate requirement as determined by the OSH Safety Manager will be used.  The USGS may establish more stringent requirements.

B.  If standards do not exist, the USGS Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch may develop them, using the following process:

(1)  The USGS Director notifies the Secretary of the Interior of the intent to develop an alternate standard.  

(2)  The proposed standard is provided for comment to all affected parties.

(3)  The final draft is sent through the DOI Chief, Office of Occupational Safety and Health, and the DOI DASHO to the Secretary of Labor.  The final draft package will include written comments received.

(4)  Upon the Secretary of Labor approval, the standard may be adopted by DOI and USGS.

C.  When USGS personnel work jointly with other Federal agencies and conflicts exist between the agency standards, the most stringent standards will apply unless an agreement is reached between the agencies.

D.  USGS personnel will comply with adopted standards, laws, and regulations of State/local governments, when they do not conflict with more stringent DOI or USGS standards.

E.  Special requirements applicable to and adopted by the USGS include:

(1)  Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU).

(2)  Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986, as amended.

(3)  State Commercial Motor Vehicle regulations for Commercial Driver License.

(4)  Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

(5)  Service Contract Act of 1965, as amended.

(6)  5 United States Code (U.S.C.) 43 Performance Appraisal45 Incentive Awards7902 Safety programs, and 7903 Protective clothing and equipment.

(7)  16 U.S.C. 1701-1706 Youth Conservation Corps Act.

(8)  18 U.S.C. Crimes and Criminal Procedure, Chapter 44 Firearms.

(9)  43 U.S.C. 1457 Duties of the Secretary.

(10)  46 U.S.C. 2101 General definitions.

(11)  5 CFR Parts 430 Performance Management and 451 Agency Awards.

(12)  10 CFR Energy.

(13)  14 CFR Aeronautics and Space (Parts 1 – 59, 60 – 109, 110 -199).

(14)  21 CFR Part 1040 Performance standards for light-emitting products.

(15)  24 CFR Part 35 Lead-based Paint Poisoning Prevention in Certain Residential Structures (Subparts B through R).

(16)  27 CFR Parts 447 Importation of Arms, Ammunition and Implements of War, 478 Commerce in Firearms and Ammunition, and 479 Machine Guns, Destructive Devices, and Certain Other Firearms.

(17)  29 CFR Labor (Parts 57019101915191719181919192519261928, and 1960, as amended).

(18)  29 CFR 1910.1450 Appendix A, National Research Council Recommendations Concerning Chemical Hygiene in Laboratories, including recommendations from the U.S. Chemical Safety Board.

(19)  33 CFR Subchapter F Vessel Operating Regulations and Subchapter S Boating Safety.

(20)  36 CFR 1191 Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities: Architectural Barriers Act Accessibilities Guidelines and 1192 Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles.

(21)  41 CFR Parts 101 Federal Property Management Regulations and 102 Federal Management Regulation.

(22)  42 CFR Part 84 Approval of Respiratory Protective Devices.

(23)  46 CFR Subchapter C Uninspected Vessels, Subchapter I Cargo and Miscellaneous Vessels (Parts 90 - 105 and Parts 107 - 109), Subchapter S Subdivision and Stability, Subchapter T Small Passenger Vessels, and Subchapter U Oceanographic Research Vessels.

(24)  48 CFR Federal Acquisition Regulations System (Parts 1 – 51 and 52 - 99).

(25)  49 CFR Parts 100-185 Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Department of Transportation.

(26)  U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Instruction M16672.2D Navigation Rules (International-Inland).

(27)  Department Manual (DM) Parts 350-353 Aviation Management.

(28)  DM Part 485 Safety and Occupational Health Program.

(29)  485 DM 18 Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

(30)  DOI Handbook to Guide Completion of the Safety and Occupational Health Program Evaluation Tool, March 2010.

(31)  DOI Safety Management Information System.

(32)  Office of Aviation Services Operational Procedures Memoranda.

(33)  Aviation Life Support Equipment Handbook.

(34)  Interagency Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials Handbook.

(35)  Survey Manual (SM) 402.3 Requisition for Procurement of Goods and Services.

(36)  SM 402.5 Procurement Specifications.

(37)  SM 404.10 Requisitions for Contracts and Assistance Awards.

(38)  SM 408-2-H Property Handbook.

(39)  SM 440-2-H Physical Security Handbook.

(40)  SM 445-3-H Safety and Health for Field Operations Handbook.

(41)  SM 500-23-H USGS Volunteer for Science Handbook.

(42)  Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations Reports, USGS.

(43)  A Guide to Safe Field Operations, Open-File Report 95-777.

(44)  Guidelines for Handling Birds to Prevent Spread of West Nile Virus, USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

(45)  Health Information for International Travel (Yellow Book), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, latest revision.

(46)  Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis. MMWR 2001; 50 (No. RR-11), CDC.

(47)  Occupational Exposure to Hot Environments, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Revised Criteria 1986.

(48)  Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for Hazardous Waste Site Activities, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Coast Guard, and Environmental Protection Agency; October 1985.

(49)  American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices (latest edition).

(50)  American National Standards Institute 107, A117.1, C95.1, N43.2, N43.3, Z10, Z87.1, Z89.1, Z136.1, Z136.6 (latest editions).

(51)  Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers SA-C95.3.1 and C95.7 (latest editions).

(52)  International Building Code (latest edition).

(53)  International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (current version).

(54)  National Fire Protection Association 1 , 4551B , 70 , 70E , 101 , 306 , 326 , and 495 (latest editions).

(55)  Prudent Practices in the Laboratory - Handling and Management of Chemical Hazards.

(56)  Roger L. Brauer, Safety and Health for Engineers, current edition,published by John Wiley and Sons.

(57)  National Safety Council, Accident Prevention Manual for Business and IndustryAdministration and Programs, current edition.
 

 

/s/ Katherine McCulloch                                                                    August 31, 2015
______________________________________________                ________________
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                 Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 5

Program Evaluations and Policy Self Assessments

Instruction: This chapter is revised to address organizational changes and the requirements of Department of the Interior (DOI) Manual Part 485, Chapter 5 (485 DM 5) Program Evaluations.

 

1.  Purpose/Scope.  This chapter specifies minimum requirements for conducting evaluations of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Programs.  The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is required by Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1960.78 to develop and implement a process for evaluating the effectiveness of the OSH Program.  

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  Public Law 91–596, Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 as amended, Section 19.

B.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  29 CFR Part 1960, Subpart J, Evaluation of Federal Occupational Safety and Health Programs (29 CFR 1960.781960.79, and 1960.80).

D.  American National Standards Institute/American Industrial Hygiene Association Z10–2012, Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems.

E.  485 DM 5, Program Evaluations.

F.  485 DM 6, Inspections and Abatement.

G.  Department of the Interior Handbook to Guide Completion of the Safety and Occupational Health Program Evaluation Tool, March 2010.

H.  U.S. Geological Survey Occupational Safety and Health Guide for Program Evaluations and Policy Self Assessments, December 2009.

 

3.  Program Evaluation Requirements.

A.  The Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch (OSHMB) shall conduct evaluations of each mission area, office and regional OSH program at least once every 3 years.  Field Office Evaluations shall be scheduled and conducted in conjunction with annual compliance inspections.  (Reference 485 DM 6 and SM 445-2-H.6.)

B.  OSH Program evaluations include site visits to observe field operations and activities, interviews, and opening and closing conferences with senior staff participating.  During the closing conference, evaluation findings and recommendations shall be presented.

C.  All OSH Program evaluations address Federal standards, DOI and Survey Manuals, and OSH Program requirements.

D.  OSH Program evaluations follow the format and criteria specified in the USGS Occupational Safety and Health Guide for Program Evaluations, to include a review of the following OSH Program Evaluation Components:

(1)  Leadership and Management.

(2)  Employee Participation.

(3)  Hazard Recognition and Prevention.

(4)  Evaluation and Analysis.

(5)  Training and Awareness.

(6)  Program Implementation and Operation.

E.  OSH Program Evaluation reports shall be transmitted by the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO) to the respective Associate or Regional Director.  Reports shall address best practices, OSH Program deficiencies and findings, recommendations for corrective actions, and suggestions for OSH Program enhancements.  Mission area, office, or regional evaluation reports shall be uploaded to the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS). 

F.  The evaluated organization shall prepare corrective actions to address deficiencies and findings in IAS within 60 calendar days.  OSH Program deficiencies shall be tracked quarterly at a minimum with final abatement actions documented within IAS.

G.  Follow-up visits and status reports shall be used, to verify that deficiencies are resolved.  

H.  The Director, Associate and Regional Directors, Office of Management Services (OMS) Chief, and their respective full-time OSH staff conduct an annual self-assessment of individual policy responsibilities and document conformance in IAS.  Corrective actions are tracked quarterly with final abatement actions documented within IAS.

 

4.  Responsibilities.
A.  Director, DASHO, and Associate and Regional Directors.

(1)  Provide staff and funding support to ensure that program requirements are implemented, program evaluations are completed and findings are abated. 

(2)  Provide staff assistance and timely information during formal program evaluations.

(3)  Complete an annual policy self-assessment of safety and health responsibilities within the IAS. 

(4)  Ensure that follow up occurs every 90 days for program evaluation and policy self-assessment findings and those actions are documented in the IAS until abatement is completed.

(5)  Associate and Regional Directors shall disseminate program evaluation reports to employees within the evaluated organization and discuss the results of the evaluations and recommendations for corrective actions with organizational managers and occupational safety and health staff.  Proposed and actual actions for correcting hazards and deficiencies shall be documented within the IAS and tracked until completed. 

B.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Ensures the establishment of an evaluation process for assessing the effectiveness of mission area, office, or region OSH programs and the control of OSH hazards.

(2)  Completes an annual policy self-assessment of safety and health responsibilities within the IAS. 

(3)  Ensures that follow up occurs every 90 days for all policy self-assessment findings and that actions are documented in the IAS until the abatement is completed.

(4)  Provides support services and coordinates with Associate and Regional Directors to address gaps and deficiencies identified through program evaluations and policy self-assessments.   

C.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Establishes an evaluation process for assessing the effectiveness of mission area, office, or region OSH programs and the control of OSH hazards and provides management oversight and quality control of program evaluation processes.

(2)  Develops standardized program evaluation and policy assessment tools to meet program evaluation and policy assessment requirements.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance to the mission area and regional OSH staff in interpreting and implementing OSH Program requirements.

(4)  Coordinates the implementation of evaluations inclusive of in-and-out briefings to organizational managers.  Ensures that OSH Program evaluations are scheduled within the IAS.

(5)  Reports quarterly to the OSH Council on the status of program evaluation abatement actions.
 
(6)  Ensures that annual policy self-assessments are completed and that findings are documented in the IAS.  Follows up every 90 days for OSHMB policy self-assessment findings and documents abatement actions in the IAS until abatement is completed.

(7)  Coordinates program evaluation reports and submits through the Chief, OMS, to the DASHO.

(8)  Reviews program evaluations, policy self-assessments, and abatement plans to incorporate pertinent information into the annual DOI OSH report. 

(9)  Provides OSH compliance guidance and assistance in implementing OSH Program requirements to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

D.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Coordinate with OSHMB staff to establish and document an evaluation schedule for assessing the program within their respective region.

(2)  Participate in OSHMB-conducted OSH Program evaluations.  Follow up every 90 days on abatement actions resulting from program evaluations until all findings are abated in the IAS.

(3)  Conduct annual policy self-assessment to assess regional safety and health responsibilities and document the findings in the IAS.  Follow up every 90 days on all policy self-assessment findings until the abatement is completed.

E.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Coordinate respective cost center program evaluations including interviews with local staff and collaborates with OSH staff.

(2)  Coordinates the documentation of abatement actions within the IAS, following up every 90 days until all findings are abated in the IAS.  Provide quarterly status reports of open and closed findings to the Science Center Director, senior management officials, and local safety committee. 

(3)  Provide guidance and assistance to field managers and supervisors regarding compliance with program evaluation requirements.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              September 11, 2015
_________________________________                                          ______________        
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                    Date
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 6

Inspections and Abatement

Instruction:  Changes to this chapter were made to reflect changes made to the organizational structure during Bureau realignment.

 

1.  Purpose/Scope.  This chapter specifies the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for conducting safety and health inspections of establishments and the timely abatement of identified hazards for all U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) establishments and worksites.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  Public Law 91–596, Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, (the Act), Section 19.

B.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 1960, Subpart D, Inspection and Abatement (1960.25 – 1960.31).

D.  29 CFR 1960.34 General Provisions (General Services Administration).

E.  Roger L. Brauer, Safety and Health for Engineers, current edition,published by John Wiley and Sons.

F.  National Safety Council, Accident Prevention Manual for Business and IndustryAdministration and Programs, current edition.

G.  American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), Z10 (current version), Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems.

H.  41 CFR Part 102–74.360 What are the specific accident and fire prevention responsibilities of occupant agencies?

I.  485 DM 6, Inspections and Abatement.

J.  SM 445-2-H Chapter 8, Employee Reports of Unsafe Conditions and Allegations of Reprisal.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  The Bureau shall conduct and document inspections of all areas and operations of establishments under its control for occupational safety and health compliance at least annually as required by 29 CFR 1960 Subpart D and this chapter.  More frequent inspections shall be conducted when there is an increased risk of accidents or incidents.  The USGS Program includes the following types of inspection activities:

(1)  Day-to-Day Inspections.  Supervisors shall monitor conditions daily in the workplace to prevent injuries, occupational illnesses, and accidents that cause property damage.

(2)  Annual Inspections.  All workplaces and areas and operations shall be inspected at least annually.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) accomplish this requirement by conducting a walk around of all local facilities/operations using appropriate checklists and a self-inspection questionnaire.  All identified noncompliant conditions (findings) shall be documented in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS) until they are corrected.

(3)  External and Unannounced Inspections.  

(a)  External occupational safety and health inspections are conducted by headquarters and regional full-time occupational safety and health staffs who are trained in hazard recognition and occupational safety and health inspection procedures.  The schedule for inspections and evaluations shall be based on high-risk activities, high rates of accidents, occupational hazards, past Program history, personnel turnover, the amount of time since the last formal review, and similar criteria.  External Specialized Safety Program inspections planned for the upcoming fiscal year shall be scheduled within the IAS no later than September 30 of the current calendar year.  Results of external inspections shall be documented in IAS.  

(b)  A reasonable number of unannounced external inspections of selected local field offices may be conducted by headquarters and regional full-time occupational safety and health staff to determine the overall Program effectiveness and to ensure the proper identification and abatement of locally identified hazardous conditions.  

(c)  For all external inspections, an opportunity shall be provided for an employee representative and either a representative of the workplace or a facility manager to participate in the inspection.  

(d)  The lead occupational safety and health inspector may deny the right of accompaniment to any person whose participation interferes with the inspection.

(4)  Preoccupancy Inspections.  All newly constructed or renovated space shall be inspected by full-time or collateral duty occupational safety and health professionals or other qualified person(s) for unsafe or unhealthful conditions and compliance with all applicable standards, codes, and requirements.  On the basis of the inspection findings, the inspector shall either recommend occupancy of the space or identify corrective actions needed to bring the space into a safe and healthful condition before occupancy. The issues that cannot be resolved locally should be directed to the appropriate Office of Management Services (OMS) or regional occupational safety and health staff or to the General Services Administration.

B.  Annual and external inspections shall be conducted by persons who are trained in hazard recognition and occupational safety and health inspection procedures.  As defined in 29 CFR 1960.25 and 1960.2(s), occupational safety and health specialists in the 0018/0690 career series having experience and/or up-to-date training in occupational safety and health hazard recognition and evaluation meet the qualifications of occupational safety and health inspectors.  For those working environments where there are less complex hazards, inspectors (such as CDSPCs or facility managers) shall have documented training and/or experience in the safety and health hazards of the workplace that are sufficient to recognize and evaluate those particular hazards and to suggest general abatement procedures.  Within the USGS, completion of the twenty-four USGS Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Equivalent 6000 Courses within DOI LEARN establishes the minimum educational requirements for the conduct of such workplaces, to be supplemented by additional on-the-job training from headquarter and regional occupational safety and health staff and formal training outlined in the Department of the Interior (DOI) Safety and Health Training, Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full-Time Safety Personnel Handbook.  

C.  Inspectors conducting occupational safety and health inspections are required to:

(1)  Have the necessary equipment to conduct the inspection.

(2)  Examine appropriate accident records and previous inspection reports.

(3)  Hold an opening conference with the establishment manager.

(4)  Consult with employees on matters of safety and health.

(5)  Inform managers and employees of imminently dangerous conditions.

(6)  Conduct personal monitoring (sampling) of employee work environments, where appropriate.

(7)  Comply with safety rules and practices.

(8)  Take or obtain photographs, where appropriate.

(9)  Avoid unreasonable disruption of the operation.

(10)  Hold a closing conference with the representative from the appropriate level(s) of management and the employees in order to disclose the findings of the inspection and recommend abatement measures.  The manager(s) and employee representative(s) shall be afforded an opportunity to bring other information to the attention of the inspector regarding unsafe or unhealthful conditions in the workplace.

D.  If an imminently dangerous condition (Risk Assessment Code 1, or RAC-1) or elevated threat to life, health, or property (RAC-2) is found, the manager in charge shall initiate corrective and/or protective action immediately and, if necessary, stop the operation and/or evacuate the area except for those employees who are assigned to abate the condition.

E.  Within 15 calendar days of completing a formal inspection (30 calendar days for health-related items), a written "Notice of Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition" (the Notice) for identified RAC-1 or RAC-2 conditions shall be transmitted by the inspector to the site supervisor and conspicuously posted at or near each place where a hazardous working condition exists, if practical, until: (1) the condition is abated or (2) for three working days, whichever is longer.  If not practical, the Notice shall be posted where it is readily observable by all affected employees.  The establishment manager shall ensure that all employees are briefed on the hazard(s) and on the steps underway to abate the condition(s).  For inspections conducted by the Bureau, the Notice that is made available to affected personnel shall consist of the printout of open findings within the IAS that relate to the unsafe or unhealthful conditions. This printout shall detail all findings and/or unsafe or unhealthful condition(s), including the information contained in 6.3.F. below or a “Report of Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition” as described in SM 445-2-H.8, as applicable.

F.  The Notice shall contain the following minimum information and shall be provided to those at the appropriate levels of management and to the employee representative(s) participating in the inspection:

(1)  Identification of the location of the hazard.

(2)  Description of the nature and extent of the hazard.

(3)  Risk Assessment Code (RAC).  RACs are assigned by the inspectors to each hazard or deficiency that violates an authority or reference to this chapter.  RACs are used to assist management with the prioritization of resources to abate the most critical hazards or deficiencies on a “worst-first” basis.  The RAC assigned to each hazard is an expression of risk that combines the severity of the hazardous condition with the probability that it will result in an accident.  The exposure of personnel to a hazard is an integral part of the probability determination and should be considered when assessing the likelihood of a hazard resulting in an accident, injury, or illness.  The RAC criteria and definitions are detailed in the DOI Risk Assessment System in Appendix A.

(4)  Description of the mitigation control measures.

(5)  Reference to applicable safety or health standards.

(6)  Establishment of a reasonable time for abatement of the hazard.  Initial mitigation or abatement of the hazard or condition should be accomplished within the following timeframes:

RAC Code Initial Abatement Timeframe
1 As soon as possible within that work shift
2 As soon as possible, but no later than 15 calendar days
3 Within 12 months
4 Within one budget cycle (no longer than 2 years)
5 Incorporate abatement into the 5-Year Plan

G.  The CDSPCs or other local designated persons with access to IAS are responsible for coordinating with their respective local managers and supervisors to obtain the proposed or final corrective actions for each deficiency and document the status of corrective actions in IAS every 90 days until each hazardous condition is abated.

H.  An abatement plan shall be established for all inspection findings which cannot be abated within 30 calendar days.  The plan should include an explanation for the abatement delay, proposed corrective actions, a timetable for abatement, and a summary of the interim steps that have been taken to protect personnel.  If the abatement plan changes, the supervisor shall be responsible for preparing and posting a new Notice of Hazard with updated information.  Note: The initial RAC assigned by the inspector shall remain the assigned RAC, regardless of any interim control measures and mitigation taken to reduce risk.  Use of IAS finding and tracking functions facilitates meeting the intent of this requirement.

I.  The local managers shall be responsible for the quarterly review of all open inspection findings and Notices within the local abatement log in IAS.  A printout of the local IAS abatement log shall be provided quarterly to the local occupational safety and health committee and to the employees' representative(s), as applicable.  Headquarters and regional safety staff shall use the IAS report function to provide the respective managers and committees with a quarterly status of all open findings in IAS.

J.  If the local manager does not have the authority or resources to abate the hazardous condition, he or she shall do the following:

(1)  Inform and protect potentially affected employees.

(2)  Inform and request assistance from the next highest manager in the organization and the respective safety staff; e.g., the Regional Director or Associate Director’s office, and the respective Regional Safety Manager or Headquarters occupational safety and health staff. 

(3)  When necessary, coordinate with the Federal lessor agency; e.g., the General Services Administration; to secure abatement as specified in 29 CFR Part 1960.34.

(4)  Each facility-related hazardous condition that: (a) will cost more than $25,000 to abate, (b) is identified in IAS, and (c) is outside the financial resources of the cost center, shall be incorporated in a facilities maintenance management system and prioritized using Appendix A.  Deferred maintenance project entries should be cross-referenced in IAS.

J.  OSHA, DOI, and USGS full-time occupational safety and health professionals have the right of entry without delay, at reasonable times, to any facility, construction site, or other workplace to perform an inspection.  They also have the right to inspect any item or place within the establishment and to question, privately, any employee, manager, supervisor, visitor, contractor, or concessioner associated with the establishment.  (See 29 CFR 1960.26 and 1960.31.)

K.  If an inspector from OSHA arrives to conduct an inspection, the local CDSPC will be notified immediately so that he or she can accompany the OSHA inspector.  The local CDSPC will notify the respective Regional Safety Manager or Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Manager that an OSHA inspector is onsite.  In turn, the Regional Safety Manager notifies the Bureau OSH Program Manager.

L. The OSHA inspection shall be entered as a “Safety – Other” audit, with a copy of the OSHA report uploaded and individual OSHA findings and corresponding abatement actions documented in IAS.  

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director, Associate and Regional Directors, and Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Require compliance with occupational safety and health inspection requirements.

(2)  Assure that all subordinate locations and operations are inspected by September 30 of each fiscal year and that followup inspections are conducted as appropriate.

(3)  Ensure that assigned occupational safety and health staff are knowledgeable about the inspection process and have the ability to recognize occupational safety and health hazards.

(4)  Ensure that identified inspection findings and hazards are classified according to the DOI Risk Assessment System.

(5)  Provide personnel and financial resources, as needed, to abate hazardous conditions and to facilitate the successful completion of the inspection process, which includes continuous improvement in compliance from year to year.

B.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Ensures the establishment of an evaluation process for assessing: (a) the effectiveness of national- and regional-level occupational safety and health inspection programs and (b) the control of occupational safety and health hazards.

(2)  Provide support services to and coordinate with Associate Directors and Regional Directors to address gaps and deficiencies identified through self and external inspections and track associated corrective actions through abatement to facilitate Program improvement.

C.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides occupational safety and health inspection oversight to ensure that an effective bureau process is in place for identifying, evaluating, and controlling occupational safety and health hazards, where applicable.

(2)  Monitors inspections to ensure that all organizations conduct self-inspections by September 30 of each fiscal year and that external inspections are conducted, as appropriate.

(3)  Develops and maintains the IAS in order to meet the finding or deficiency tracking and abatement requirements.

(4)  Develops and incorporates standardized inspection checklists and tools for use in meeting the self-conducted and external inspection requirements in IAS.

(5)  Develops IAS reports to facilitate misson area, regional, and local tracking of unabated inspection deficiencies and for use by managers in reviews of the appropriateness and timeliness of corrective actions.

(6)  Coordinates with the Office of Management Services, Facilities Management Branch, to include Condition Assessment Occupational Safety and Health findings sin IAS and reviews annually deferred maintenance projects to facilitate appropriate prioritization in accordance with the RAC criteria and definitions detailed in Appendix A.

(7)  Annually reviews abatement plans and reports for unsafe or unhealthful conditions of national significance.

(8)  Conducts an annual analysis of the Bureau’s occupational safety and health inspection findings and deficiencies and provides to the Bureau OSH Council and integrates the analysis into the Annual Report sent to the DOI Office of Occupational Safety and Health, as appropriate.

(9)  Ensures that all external Specialized Safety Program inspections planned for the upcoming fiscal year are scheduled in IAS.

(10)  Coordinates with Regional Safety Managers, and Associate Director points of contact, and local CDSPCs to establish and publish a formal schedule for OSH inspections conducted within the Bureau, including those conducted by the Regional Safety Managers and Specialized Safety Program Managers at local field offices, in order to eliminate the duplication of effort and ensure the most effective allocation of resources.  

(11)  Ensures that all external OMS and regional occupational safety and health compliance inspections planned for the upcoming fiscal year are scheduled in IAS.

(12)  Reviews IAS abatement logs and associated reports and communicates information, as needed, to ensure appropriate and timely corrective actions.

(13)  Conducts a trend analysis of mission area and regional occupational safety and health inspection findings and deficiencies and develops initiatives to address common findings and deficiencies.

(14)  Supports Regional Safety Managers and mission area safety and health points of contact or CDSPCs by providing IAS training that incorporates the inspection process, thus enabling the subject personnel to recognize occupational safety and health hazards through workplace inspections.

(15)  Conducts compliance inspections of mission area capabilities and facilities.

D.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide inspection program oversight of all organizations within their respective regions to ensure that an effective program is in place for the identification, evaluation, and control of occupational safety and health hazards.

(2)  Monitor self-conducted inspections in IAS to ensure that all locations within their regions are inspected annually and follow up as appropriate to ensure the timely closure of field-level deficiencies and/or to update the status of corrective actions.

(3)  Establish a formal schedule and conduct external safety and health inspections of subordinate field locations.

(4)  Document the inspections conducted at the field localities within their regions in IAS.

(5)  Review IAS reports and abatement logs and communicate the information to the respective regional and local managers, as needed, to ensure appropriate and timely corrective actions.

(8)  Conduct a trend analysis of region-wide inspection findings and deficiencies and develop initiatives to address those that are common to subordinate field locations.

(9)  Support the local CDSPCs by providing IAS training that incorporates the inspection process, thus enabling the subject personnel to recognize occupational safety and health hazards through workplace inspections.

(10)  Review condition assessment audit reports and upload occupational safety and health findings and assign RAC codes in IAS so that local cost centers can document and track abatement actions.

E.  Center Directors/Field Office Chiefs/Program Managers.

(1)  Ensure completion of the respective occupational safety and health self-inspections of all field facilities and operations by September 30 of each fiscal year.

(2)  Annually review organizational action plans (abatement logs) and IAS reports.  Provide personnel and financial resources, as needed, to abate occupational safety and health hazards to facilitate the continuous improvement of local compliance.

(3)  Ensure that an abatement plan is established for all inspection findings which cannot be abated within 30 calendar days.

F.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Conduct a workplace occupational safety and health inspection at least annually.  Use IAS to identify, document, and track occupational safety and health deficiencies until corrective action is taken either to eliminate or reduce the hazard to an acceptable level.  High-hazard workplaces or locations where there is an increased risk of accident or injury due to the nature of the operations shall be inspected more frequently.

(2)  Provide guidance and assistance to managers and supervisors to aid them in complying with occupational safety and health program inspection requirements.

(3)  Coordinate the annual local occupational safety and health self-inspections to include all subordinate facilities or locations with supervisors, managers, and other collateral-duty staff; e.g., local firearms and watercraft instructors and chemical hygiene officers. Local organizations are exempt from this requirement if they are undergoing an external review by full-time national- or regional-level occupational safety and health staff during the fiscal year.

(4)  Document inspection findings and associated corrective actions in IAS, as appropriate.  Follow up on local abatement logs to ensure that corrective actions are documented and/or the status of corrective actions is updated in IAS every 90 days.

(5)  Coordinate with local managers and administrative staff to incorporate IAS and condition assessment facility-related safety and health deficiencies that will cost more than $25,000 to abate into the local and deferred maintenance plan, as appropriate.

 Appendix 6-A: Risk Assessment Code (RAC) Matrix for the Risk Assessment System

 

/s/ Katherine McCulloch __________________________                9/19/14_____________
Katherine McCulloch                                                                          Date
Acting Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 7

Accident/Incident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation

Instructions:  This chapter is revised to reflect the change in DOI policy that states that a serious accident is one involving the death of an employee or hospitalization of three or more persons, or Departmental or Bureau property loss in excess of $250,000 (previously $100,000).  This chapter also reflects the new Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300 used for an annual summary of injuries and illnesses, replacing references to the old OSHA Form 200.

 

1.  Purpose.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for reporting Department of the Interior (Departmental or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) incidents and accidents and additional requirements for the reporting of Departmental or USGS serious accidents. For reporting purposes, a Departmental or USGS incident is an unplanned event involving Departmental or USGS property, personnel, volunteers, contractors, emergency firefighters, the public, or the environment that could have resulted in an injury, illness, or material loss but did not. If there is injury, illness, or loss of property, the incident is reported as an accident. In brief, a Departmental or USGS serious accident is an accident involving a death and/or three or more persons hospitalized and/or Departmental or USGS property loss in excess of $250,000. A complete serious accident definition is given in Appendix 7-1, “Serious Accident Investigation,” of this Handbook.

B.  To specify requirements for conducting a serious accident investigation involving Departmental or USGS personnel, volunteers, contractors, emergency firefighters, or the public, when Departmental or USGS property and/or operations are involved (except aviation mishaps which will be investigated by the Office of Aircraft Services [OAS] in accordance with 352 DM 6).

C.  Reportable accidents are those involving a USGS government employee, contractor, or volunteer; a member of the public injured while on or in contact with USGS property; and government or private property damaged during conduct of a USGS activity.

D.  All serious accidents (those resulting in the death of an employee or hospitalization of three or more personnel, or $250,000 in property damage) shall be reported to the Bureau Safety Manager through the Regional Safety Manager/Regional Safety Officer by the appropriate organizational head immediately upon learning of the event or within 4 hours of occurrence. Bureau Safety Managers will, in turn, notify the Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO) through the Chief, Headquarters Office of Management Services, while Regional Safety Managers/Officers will notify their respective Regional Directors/Executives.

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1960, Subpart I, Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements.

B.  Department of the Interior “Serious Accident Investigation,” Appendix 7-1 of this Handbook.

C.  Department of the Interior “Serious Accidents Related to Wildland and Prescribed Fire,” Appendix 7-2 of this Handbook.

D.  Memorandum of Understanding between the Department of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture, October 26, 1995, Appendix 7-3 of this Handbook.

 

3.  Incident/Accident Reporting Requirements.

A.  Supervisor Requirements.  The appropriate immediate supervisor will record all incidents and accidents in the Safety Management Information System (SMIS).  The SMIS is managed by the Office of Occupational Health and Safety (OHS), with administrative support provided by the USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch.

(1)  The SMIS Accident/Incident Report is the official Departmental or USGS method for reporting incidents and accidents.  A SMIS Accident/Incident Report is defined as the electronic entry of factual and supplemental accident/incident information into SMIS.  The SMIS automated system for reporting an accident/incident is located at the following Web site http://www.smis.doi.gov.

(2)  The USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch serves as the Office of Record for SMIS Accident/Incident Reports and for additional serious accident investigation reports as described in Appendix 7-1 of this Handbook.  This information will be controlled in accordance with Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act requirements.

B.  Personnel Requirements.  Personnel are required to immediately report to their supervisors every job-related accident or incident and to complete either the OWCP Form CA-1 (Traumatic Injury) or OWCP Form CA-2 (Illness) when injury has occurred. Accidents include:

(1)  An injury, occupational illness, or death connected with the performance of work duties by personnel, volunteers, contractors, or emergency firefighters under Departmental or USGS jurisdiction.

(2)  An injury or death to the public and/or property damage related to Departmental or USGS operations.

(3)  A fire resulting in at least a $500 loss involving vehicles, motorized equipment, aircraft, watercraft, structures, or contents of any property under Departmental or USGS control.

(4)  Property damage or injury resulting from the operation of Departmental or USGS, General Services Administration (GSA), privately owned, or commercially leased vehicles, or motorized equipment used for official business.

(5)  Other property under Departmental or USGS control that is damaged by accident, whether or not it is to be repaired or replaced, regardless of who caused the damage—employee, volunteer, contractor, emergency firefighter, or private individual.

(6)  Shelter deployments and entrapments as a result of wildland or prescribed fire-related operations.

C.  Work-Related Injury Reports.

(1)  Appropriate employee injury compensation forms will be prepared by the involved employee or his/her representative (see 20 CFR 10).

(2)  SMIS can generate the Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs CA-1 Form, “Federal Employee’s Notice of Traumatic Injury and Claim for Continuation of Pay/Compensation,” and CA-2 Form, “Notice of Occupational Disease and Claim for Compensation,” based on information submitted in the SMIS Accident/Incident Report.

D.  Investigation Requirements.

(1)  Except for serious accidents, immediate supervisors will investigate and record in SMIS all incidents and accidents that occur under their jurisdiction.

(2)  For a serious accident, the immediate supervisor must initiate the recording of the accident in SMIS, but the report must also be reviewed by the USGS Organizational Manager of the facility incurring the accident. Serious accident investigation requirements and responsibilities are listed in Appendix 7-1 of this Handbook.  The USGS Organizational Manager is the facility/organization manager who has direct line authority over employee activity when and where a serious accident occurs. Examples of such administrators include a Science Center Director or Office/Team Chief.

(3)  The Bureau DASHO will ensure that serious accidents are fully investigated in accordance with Appendix 7-1 of this Handbook. Appendix 7-1 contains requirements for serious accident investigations; time frames for completion of reports; immediate notifications; the use of a Serious Accident Investigation Team (SAIT) versus a Trained Investigator (TI); SAIT composition, responsibilities, and qualifications; and report recommendation follow-up procedures.

(4)  Wildland and prescribed fire-related serious accidents will be investigated in accordance with Appendix 7-2 of this Handbook.

E.  Accident/Exposure Logging Requirements.

(1)  Immediate supervisors, with the oversight of USGS region and/or Bureau safety staff, will review and record job-related SMIS Accident/Incident Reports, including first-aid cases, in SMIS within 7 calendar days following the date management was notified of the occurrence.  Note: This is the equivalent of entering incident/accident reports on Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300, “Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses” (see 29 CFR 1960.67). Copies of the report can be retrieved through SMIS.

(2)  Information on Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs (OWCP) Continuation of Pay and employee hours worked will be entered in SMIS by the DOI Office of Occupational Health and Safety (OHS).

(3)  Volunteer exposure information will be captured by the respective organization and reported to the USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch, which will be responsible for entering subject data in SMIS.

(4)  The USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch will also be responsible for entering emergency firefighter hours, contractor hours, and vehicle mileage information in SMIS as appropriate.

F.  Serious Accident Reporting Requirements.

(1)  Serious accidents, as defined in Appendix 7-1 of this Handbook, must be reported in the same manner as accidents/incidents in general (described in Sections 7.3A, B, and C above). Additional requirements are identified in Sections 7.3F(3) below.

(2)  Definitions.

(a)  Preliminary Notice.  A written notice of a serious accident sent to the Departmental DASHO by the USGS as a follow-up to the initial telecommunications notification.  The Preliminary Notice is forwarded within 48 hours of the accident and should contain only basic facts that are intended for information-sharing purposes only.

(b)  Factual Report.  A written report by the SAIT or TI to the USGS Director and Departmental DASHO completed within 45 calendar days of an accident.  The Factual Report contains only the basic facts related to the serious accident without any inferences, conclusions, or recommendations.  Copies of the Factual Report or factual information gleaned from the report may be distributed to other bureaus and agencies by OHS.

(c)  Management Report. A written report by the SAIT or TI to the USGS Director and Departmental DASHO completed within 45 calendar days of an accident.  The Management Report not only contains all of the basic facts that are contained in the Factual Report but also contains the results of the investigation; e.g., the SAIT or TI opinions as to why management-control systems did not prevent the accident (if applicable) and recommendations for preventing similar accidents.

(3)  A serious accident involving an employee fatality and/or the hospitalization of three or more personnel will be reported to the U.S. Department of Labor OSHA Area Office having jurisdiction over the accident site by telephone by the local organizational manager (Science Center Director, Office/Team Chief) of the organization incurring the accident.

(a)  This telephone report must be made within 8 hours of the accident occurrence as required by 29 CFR 1960.70.  Each report will include the following information: establishment name, location of accident, time of the accident, number of fatalities or hospitalized personnel, contact person, phone number, and brief accident description.

(b)  If the report cannot be made during OSHA regular business hours, Monday through Friday, then the report can be made through the OSHA telephone hotline at 1-800-321-6742.

(4)  The Bureau DASHO, Bureau Safety Manager, and the Director, OHS, will be informed of a serious accident as soon as possible through established reporting procedures for serious accidents.  The OHS Director will notify the Departmental DASHO and others as appropriate.  This applies to all serious accidents.  The DOI Watch Office can be contacted through the telephone hotline at 1-877-246-1373, on a 24-hour daily basis.

(5)  At the direction of the Bureau DASHO, the Bureau Safety Manager will provide a written Preliminary Notice to the Departmental DASHO with a copy to OHS within 48 hours of the accident. If the serious accident involves an employee fatality and/or three or more personnel hospitalized, the Preliminary Notice will include information provided to OSHA as described in Section 7.3F(3) above.

(6)  A SMIS Accident/Incident Report will be entered in SMIS by the local organizational manager (Science Center Director or Office/Team Chief) of the organization incurring the accident in accordance with Section 3.A(1) above.  Following completion of the serious accident investigation Factual Report and Management Report, the Bureau Safety and Environmental Management Branch will update the SMIS Accident/Incident Report to reflect the investigation’s findings and recommendations, as accepted by the USGS Director and/or Bureau DASHO.

G.  Special Accident Reports. In addition to Departmental or USGS accident reporting requirements, certain accidents require additional reporting as follows:

(1)  Aircraft Accident Reports.  The OAS Aviation Safety Office will coordinate the investigation of Departmental or USGS aircraft accidents/incidents with the National Transportation Safety Board. Incidents with potential for causing an aviation mishap will be identified, investigated, and documented as appropriate by the OAS Aviation Safety Office (see 352 DM 6 for additional information). This does not eliminate the requirement for the USGS to submit a SMIS Accident/Incident Report.

(2)  Aviation Mishap Information System (AMIS) Reports.  The AMIS is an electronic data (files) storage based system encompassing all aspects of aviation mishap reporting within the Department. Categories of reports include aircraft mishaps, aviation hazards, aircraft maintenance deficiencies, and airspace intrusions.  The system uses Form OAS-34 SAFECOM to report any condition, observance, act, maintenance problem, or circumstance having potential to cause an aviation-related mishap. Submitting Form OAS-34 SAFCOM is not a substitute for “on-the-spot” correction(s) to a safety concern, rather it is a tool used in the documentation, tracking, and follow-up corrective action(s) related to a safety issue (see 352 DM 1 for additional information).

(3)  Boat or Vessel Accident Reports.  If a Departmental or USGS vessel (including vessels under contract and vessels permitted to operate on U.S. or territorial waters) is involved, a Boating Accident Report, U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Form 3865, will be completed by the local organizational manager (Science Center Director or Office/Team Chief) of the organization incurring the accident whenever an accident occurs in U.S. or territorial waters and results in the loss of life, injury causing incapacitation in excess of 72 hours, or property damage in excess of $500 (see 33 CFR Part 173.55, Report of Casualty or Accident).

(4)  GSA Motor-Vehicle Accident Reports. Operator’s Report of Motor Vehicle Accident, Standard Form (SF) - 91, and Statement of Witness, SF-94, (if applicable), will be prepared and forwarded by the local organizational manager (Science Center Director or Office/Team Chief) of the organization incurring (to the GSA safety office serving as the fleet manager) when a GSA motor vehicle is involved in a Departmental or USGS accident. Forms SF-91 and SF-94 are also required if the vehicle is USGS-owned, leased, or rented, and involves public injury or damage.

(5)  Wildland and Prescribed Fire-Related Shelter Deployments and Entrapments. The initial report of shelter deployments and/or entrapments will be made in accordance with instructions listed in National Fire Equipment System (NFES) Form 0869. The final reports, which are completed at the local level, will be forwarded to the National Interagency Fire Center for review, data collection, and dissemination.

H.  Annual Accident Summary and Reports.

(1)  As stated in Section 7.3E above, the compendium of USGS SMIS Accident/Incident Reports located in SMIS constitutes the equivalent of the OSHA Form 300, “Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.” Copies can be retrieved from SMIS to meet OSHA recordkeeping requirements.

(2)  An original OSHA Form 300, OSHA Form 300A, and other supplementary records will be maintained at each USGS establishment. In situations where, for reasons of efficient administration or practicality, the USGS must maintain these records at a place other than at each establishment, a copy of the records will be made available at each establishment under the control of the local Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator. “Facts Only” may be released from an SMIS Accident/Incident Report in accordance with Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act requirements.

(3)  USGS individuals with Safety and Occupational Health Program responsibilities can obtain SMIS-generated Departmental and USGS special reports on occupational injuries, illnesses, accidents, and incidents, such as SMIS Accident/Incident Report compendiums, and reports describing indicators such as OWCP costs and injury/illness lost time rate (see 29 CFR 1960.26(a)(1) and 20 CFR 10.12).  To obtain authorized access to your organization’s data, contact the USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch.

(4)  A copy of OSHA Form 300 for an establishment will be posted not later than February 1 after the close of the previous calendar year and remain posted until April 30 or, otherwise, disseminated in writing to all personnel of that establishment.

(5)  Copies of OSHA Form 300 will be posted in a conspicuous place(s) where notices to personnel are customarily posted.  In situations where establishment activities are physically dispersed, the notice may be posted at the location to which personnel report each day.  If personnel do not primarily work at or report to a single location, the notice may be posted at the location from which personnel operate to carry out their activities. USGS organizations should take appropriate steps to prevent the summary report from being altered, defaced, or covered by other material.

I.  Retention of Records. Records are to be retained in accordance with applicable OSHA regulations and general record schedules published by the National Archives and Records Administration.

(1)  Employee occupational injury/illness information will be retained on site by the USGS for at least 5 fiscal years following the year of occurrence.

(2)  Occupational injury/illness records will be retained as part of the employee’s medical record in the SF-66D, employee medical folder.  This folder is an official extension of the official personnel file system.

(3)  Accident reports will be retained by the appropriate USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch, the designated Office of Record.  Accident information entered and maintained in SMIS meets the intent of this requirement.

J.  Accident Reviews.

(1)  The USGS has established appropriate procedures for review of accidents.  For individual accidents, this will include second level management and/or safety management review of the SMIS Accident/Incident Reports as they are entered in SMIS.  The USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch will conduct an annual review and resulting trend analysis of organization-wide accident information.

(2)  The USGS Safety and Environmental Management Branch may establish a Serious Accident Review Board which is an ad hoc group of safety and health professionals convened to conduct periodic review of serious accidents and resulting investigations.  The Board will be responsible for developing USGS accident-prevention recommendations for serious accidents and other selected incidents.

Appendix 7-1: Serious Accident Investigation

Appendix 7-2: Serious Accidents Related to Wildland and Prescribed Fire

Appendix 7-3: Memorandum of Understanding between DOI and U.S. Department of Agriculture  

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                      7/22/08
______________________________________                        ____________
Karen D. Baker                                                                           Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 8

Employee Reports of Unsafe Conditions and Allegations of Reprisal

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to clarify policy and procedures related to unsafe condition reporting.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify requirements for investigating and resolving employee reports of unsafe or unhealthful conditions and allegations of reprisal.  

 

2.  References.

A.  Executive Order 12196, Section 1-201 (f) and (h).

B.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1960.28, Employee Reports of Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Conditions.

C.  29 CFR 1960.30, Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.

D.  29 CFR 1960, Subpart G, Allegations or Reprisal (29 CFR 1960.46 and 1960.47).

E.  370 DM 771, Administrative Grievance Procedures.

 

3.  Informal (Verbal) Employee Reports of Unsafe or Unhealthful Conditions.

A.  All employees are encouraged to report unsafe or unhealthful conditions to help prevent accidents and injuries.  

B.  All levels of management shall ensure that employees are informed on how to report unsafe or unhealthful conditions in the following order of succession:

(1)  Line Supervisor.

(2)  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC) or local safety committee.

(3)  Organizational Manager (Science/Cost Center Management Level).

(4)  In the case of imminent danger, employees or their representatives should make reports to the line supervisor, the CDSPC or organizational management by the most expeditious means available.  Imminent danger refers to any condition or practice that could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm before normal abatement actions can be taken.

(5)  Imminent danger conditions will be investigated by line managers and/or the CDSPC within 24 hours, potentially serious conditions investigated within 3 working days, and other hazardous conditions investigated within 20 working days.

(6)  Organizational management should ensure informal unsafe or unhealthful condition reports are documented within the Department of the Interior Safety Management Information System (SMIS) to include the results of the investigation and actions taken to abate the condition.

 

4.  Formal Employee Reports of Unsafe or Unhealthful Conditions.

A.  Any employee may submit a formal report online using the DOI SMIS.

B.  Use of the SMIS allows employees the opportunity to request anonymity.  Anonymous reports shall be investigated in the same manner as signed reports.  Employees submitting anonymous reports will have their identities kept confidential to anyone other than those authorized by the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act, e.g. local, regional, or Bureau OSH staff.

C.  The CDSPC is responsible for working with line supervisors to determine if the reported condition is valid and to abate valid conditions.  All reports shall be tracked by the CDSPC until resolved. (See 29 CFR 1960.30.)  If more than 30 days is needed to abate the condition, the originator (if known) will be kept informed of the abatement status every 30 days until final abatement is achieved.

 

5.  Communication of the Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition.

A.  Upon investigation of any unsafe condition report and confirming validity of a hazardous condition, a written "Notice of Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition" (Notice) will be conspicuously posted at or near each location where a hazardous working condition exists until the condition is abated or for three working days, whichever is longer.  If not practical, the Notice will be posted where it is readily observable by all affected employees.  For USGS purposes, the Notice can be the posting of a print out of the SMIS Unsafe Condition Report depicting the condition, mitigation measures and proposed corrective action(s).  Note: Reporting Employee and Supervisor Information shall be purged from the report prior to posting to ensure reporter anonymity.

B.  The CDSPC shall send a written reply to the originator (if known) of the report within 10 working days of receipt of report.  This reply is in the form of an automated message within SMIS that notifies the originator of the CDSPC investigative results and planned or actual abatement action(s) if the condition is valid.  Every effort will be made to resolve the concern of the employee to mutual satisfaction.  If the condition determined to be invalid, the rationale shall be cited for making that determination in the reply to include originator appeal rights.

 

6.  Appeals.

A.  If management or the CDSPC determines that a reported unsafe or unhealthful condition is not valid and the employee believes the condition has not been abated, the employee or the employee’s representative may sequentially appeal to higher authorities using the following hierarchy:

(1)  Reports not satisfactorily resolved at the local level may be appealed to the respective Regional or Bureau full time safety manager.

(2)  Reports not satisfactorily resolved at the Regional level may be appealed to the Bureau OSH Program Manager.

(3)  Reports not satisfactorily resolved at the Bureau level may be appealed to the USGS Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO).

(4)  Reports not satisfactorily resolved at the Bureau level may be appealed to the DOI DASHO.

(5)  Reports not satisfactorily resolved at the DOI level may be appealed to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor. (See 29 CFR 1960.28.)

 

7.  Requirements for Handling Employee Allegations of Reprisal.

A.  An employee is not to be subjected to restraint, interference, coercion, discrimination, or reprisal for filing a report of an unsafe or unhealthful working condition or for participating in Bureau OSH program activities.  All employees have these rights as detailed in section 19 of the OSH Act, Executive Order 12196, and 29 CFR 1960.  All employees also have the right to decline to perform his or her assigned task because of a reasonable belief that the task poses an imminent risk of death or serious bodily harm coupled with insufficient time to seek effective redress through normal hazard reporting and abatement procedures established in accordance with 29 CFR 1960 and detailed within this chapter.

B.  Employee allegations of reprisal related to reporting potentially unsafe or unhealthful conditions will be handled through Administrative Grievance Procedures (370 DM 771.3) or appropriate collective-bargaining agreements.
C.  Copies of investigation findings for allegations of reprisal shall be provided to the Bureau OSH Program Manager.  A copy will also be provided to the Secretary, U.S. Department of Labor upon request.

D.  The Bureau DASHO and Bureau OSH Program Manager shall be kept advised of activity regarding allegations of reprisal and any determinations thereof.

 

8.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Unsafe Condition Reporting and Employee Allegations of Reprisal activities through the Bureau DASHO.

B.  Associate and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for establishing, promoting, and investigating unsafe condition reporting procedures and allegation of reprisal requirements.

(2)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to abate validated unsafe conditions in a timely manner.

C.  Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.  Provides personnel and budgetary resources to facilitate reporting of unsafe conditions and allegations of reprisal.

D. Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Assigns reporting of unsafe conditions and allegations of reprisal responsibilities to the Bureau OSH Program Manager for program management and administration.

(2)  Ensures that Office of Management Services staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support region, mission area, and office unsafe condition reporting and allegations of reprisal needs.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Establishes Bureau policy and program in conformance with 29 CFR 1960.

(2)  Ensures that SMIS unsafe or unhealthful reports are reviewed and communicated quarterly to the OSH Council, to include results of investigations.

F.  Servicing Employee/Labor Relations Specialist.

Provide advice, assistance and guidance to employees, supervisors, and managers on the Administrative Grievance Procedure or applicable negotiated grievance procedures.

G.  Regional or Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Staff.

(1)  Review SMIS electronic reports and coordinate as appropriate to ensure reports are addressed in accordance with the requirements of this chapter.

(2)  Ensure that chapter requirements are assessed during on-site external safety audits and program evaluations.

H.  Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Ensure that employees know how to report informal and formal unsafe or unhealthful conditions inclusive of using the SMIS Web portal.

(2)  Ensure that no employee will be subjected to reprisal for reporting unsafe or unhealthful conditions or exercising his or her safety and health rights as described in paragraph 6A. 

(3)  Ensure that all complaints of unsafe or unhealthful conditions are investigated in accordance with the requirements of this chapter.

(4)  In cases of imminent danger, suspend operations until the hazard can be eliminated or controlled.

(5)  Immediately inform line managers and the CDSPC of all imminent danger conditions and subsequent abatement actions.

(6)  Inform employees who report unsafe or hazardous conditions on the status of planned and actual corrective action(s).

(7)  Send unsafe or hazardous condition reports related to contractor activities or operations to the respective Regional or Bureau OSH Manager for discussion with the Contracting Officer’s Representative responsible for technical monitoring or administration of the contract.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers and supervisors in establishing employee awareness and administering programs for reporting and abating unsafe or unhealthful conditions.

(2)  Immediately notify the respective Regional or Bureau OSH Manager of imminent danger conditions.

(3)  Coordinate with managers and supervisors to investigate and document unsafe or unhealthful condition reports and corrective actions within SMIS.

I.  USGS Employees, Contract Employees or their Representatives, Students and Volunteers.  Report informal and formal unsafe or unhealthful conditions to their supervisor as described within this chapter.

Appendix 8-A: Form 9-3074 Report of Unsafe or Unhealthful Condition

 

/s/ Roseann Gonzales                                                                          June 11, 2018
______________________________________________                ________________
Roseann Gonzales                                                                               Date 
Associate Director for Administration

Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 9

Occupational Safety and Health Councils, Committees, and Working Groups

Instruction: Changes to this chapter were made to reflect the newly formed Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Council and remove references to SM 308.65 Designated Agency Safety and Health Official Council.

 

1.  Purpose. To specify the minimum program requirements for the structure and function of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Council, USGS Specialized Safety Program Committees, science center occupational safety and health committees, and occupational safety and health working groups.

 

2.  Reference. 29 CFR Part 1960, subpart F, identifies requirements for certified committees and should be considered in establishing noncertified committees within the USGS.

 

3.  Acronyms.

A.  CDSPC - Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator.

B.  CFR - Code of Federal Regulations.

C.  DASHO - Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

D.  DOI - Department of the Interior.

E.  ELT - Executive Leadership Team.

F.  OMS - Office of Management Services.

G.  OSH - Occupational Safety and Health.

H.  OSHA - Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

 

4.  OSH Committees and Councils—General.

A.  Occupational safety and health councils and committees and their purposes are varied, depending on the complexity and size of the organization and the nature of its operation. Councils and committees are an integral part of the overall management effort. The USGS uses councils and committees to enhance workplace occupational safety and health compliance.

B.  Occupational safety and health council and committee members are balanced with employees knowledgeable of scientific operations and activities and (or) members knowledgeable of occupational safety and health policy, regulations, standards, rules, and procedures. This mix is essential to facilitate and guide realistic approaches and application of program requirements.

C.  The USGS has established the following council and committees to ensure that safe and healthy working conditions are established and maintained, including safe work habits and methods. Chairpersons shall strive for a balance of management, employee, and technical representation on their respective councils and committees. Members serve as advisors to their respective management, and as such, shall enhance communications between management and personnel. Scope of responsibility and involvement are defined in each of the following council and committee charters:

(1)  Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Council.

(2)  Aviation Advisory Committee.

(3)  Dive Safety Board.

(4)  Firearms Safety Committee.

(5)  Large Vessel Safety Committee.

(6)  Watercraft Safety Committee.

D.  Councils and committees have the authority to establish working groups for the purposes of research, investigations, inspections, or special safety projects.

E.  Council and committee meeting minutes, recommendations, and management responses shall be in writing and retained for at least 2 years. Copies of these records shall be provided to the next higher-level manager for review.

F.  USGS OSH Council members shall receive appropriate hazard recognition training within 6 months of their appointment. To meet this requirement, all OSH Council members shall complete the Department of the Interior (DOI) and USGS general safety orientation courses for their specific employee group within the DOI Talent Management System. In addition, all full-time occupational safety and health staff shall complete the OSHA 6000 equivalent collateral duty safety courses within the DOI Talent Management System.

 

5.  Local Science Center and Mission Area OSH Committees.

A.  Locations with 20 or more employees shall establish an OSH committee to enhance effective communications between employees and management. Committee members shall serve a minimum of 1 year. Meetings will be conducted on a quarterly basis, as a minimum. The chair of the committee is elected by the committee.

B.  Locations having fewer than 20 employees have the option of foregoing the implementation of a formal OSH committee by requiring quarterly safety meetings with all employees in attendance. During these meetings, safety problems and resolutions, project assignments, status reports, and safety awareness activities will be discussed. Such meetings are intended to be a safety forum where meaningful safety business is conducted, positive results are achieved, and the meeting is presided over by the organizational management and supported by the CDSPC.

 

6.  Occupational Safety and Health Working Groups—General.

A.  Working groups designated by the OSH Council and/or a Specialized Safety Committee shall be composed of a minimum of one OSH Council or Specialized Committee voting member to provide group direction and oversight and representatives who have agreed to work together to develop occupational safety and health program element guidelines or other documentation, to conduct research on specific occupational safety and health issues, or to perform other tasks on behalf of the OSH Council.

B.  When the Office of Management Services (OMS) Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch (OSHMB) drafts new policy or significantly changes old policy, the Chief, OSHMB, will send said policy or changes to current policy to the Field Managers Team, Business Leaders Team, and OSH Council for review, providing for a minimum of 2 weeks to respond. The OSHMB will review and incorporate comments as applicable and forward through the Chief, OMS and Chief, Office of Policy and Analysis, to the DASHO for final approval and release.

 

7.  Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Council.

A.  Review the annual OSH Program Plan that achieves program objectives and goals in concert with the Department of the Interior (DOI)/USGS OSH Strategic Plan and provide recommendations to the DASHO for implementing the plan.

B.  Provide a focal point for planning of the OSH Program inclusive of assessment of OSH Program activities and develop initiatives that address OSH program needs.

C.  Advise the DASHO on the implementation of programs involving occupational safety and health.

D.  Recommend changes to policy and provide program interpretations to clarify and facilitate OSH Program implementation and compliance.

E.  Provide a forum for the exchange of information between managers and staff to address and provide direction on OSH issues.

F.  Act collaboratively in performing functions as identified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, DOI, and the USGS. These functions include:

(1)  Establishing an OSH Program.

(2)  Recommending sufficient bureau and regional funding and staffing to effectively implement the program.

(3)  Establishing a set of procedures that ensures effective program implementation.

(4)  Reviewing established goals and injury/illness data and developing initiatives to reverse negative trends and causal factors.

(5)  Establishing plans and procedures for evaluating program effectiveness and achievement of performance metrics and goals.

(6)  Setting priorities with respect to injury and illness causal factors so that appropriate corrective actions are taken.

(7) Reviewing USGS safety award nominations, providing concurrence on awardees, and making recommendations on those for DOI recognition.

G.  Charters of the OSH Committee and Specialized Safety committees are detailed in SM 308.64, Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Committee, and SM 308.66, Aviation, Dive, Firearms, Large Vessel and Watercraft Committees or Boards.

 

8.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director. Directs Occupational Safety and Health Committee Program activities through the designation of the DASHO, who, for the USGS, is the Associate Director for Administration.

B.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO). Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish and maintain Bureau level occupational safety and health council and committees. Additionally, the DASHO advises and acts on behalf of the Director on matters concerning the safety and health of USGS personnel and property. Chairs the OSH Council.

C.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors. Designate management and safety staff appointees to the OSH Council.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services. Assists the DASHO in administration and support the OSH Council.

E.  USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Establishes an OSH Committee to address occupational safety and health issues at the national, regional, and local levels, as appropriate. Provides recommendations for program implementation and advises the DASHO on relevant safety and health matters.

(2)  Provides OSH Council administrative support, e.g., scheduling meetings, and publishing agendas and minutes. 

(3)  Establishes an Aviation Advisory Committee (AAC), which advises the DASHO through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council, to address aviation safety and related aviation issues at the USGS level. Reviews accidents related to aviation, and makes recommendations for preventing recurrence of similar accidents. Ensures that AAC membership is representative of mission areas and regional science centers that have aviation activities as well as the USGS Aviation Manager, Regional Aviation Managers, and the USGS OSHMB designee. Ensures that meetings are held a minimum of twice a year, with agenda and minutes published.

(4)  Establishes a Dive Safety Board, which advises the DASHO through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council, to address underwater diving issues. Reviews accidents related to underwater diving and make recommendations for preventing recurrence of similar accidents. Ensures that the Board membership is representative of national capabilities and regional science centers that have underwater diving operations as well as the USGS Dive Safety Officer, Regional Dive Safety Officers, and the USGS OSHMB designee, with at least two-thirds of the Board members being certified underwater divers. Ensures meetings are held quarterly, with agenda and minutes published.The USGS Firearms Safety Committee has been established

(5)  Establishes a Firearms Safety Committee, which advises the DASHO through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council, to address all firearms issues. Reviews all accidents related to firearms and makes recommendations for preventing recurrence of similar accidents. Ensures that Committee membership is representative of national capabilities and regional science centers that have firearms activities as well as the USGS Firearms Manager, Regional Firearms Managers, and the USGS OSHMB designee, with at least two-thirds of the members trained and certified in firearms. Ensures meetings are held quarterly, with agenda and minutes published.

(6)  Establishes a Large Vessel (LV) Safety Committee, which advises the DASHO through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council, to address all large vessel issues. Reviews all accidents related to large vessels (greater than or equal to 26 feet) and makes recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Ensures LV Safety Committee membership is representative of national capabilities and regional science centers that have large vessels as well as the USGS Large Vessel Safety Program Manager, Regional Large Vessel Safety Program Managers, and the USGS OSHMB designee, with at least two-thirds of the members being trained and certified in large vessel operation. Ensures meetings are held quarterly, with agenda and minutes published.

(7)  Establishes a Watercraft Safety Committee, which advises the DASHO through ad hoc membership on the OSH Council, to address all watercraft issues. Reviews all accidents related to watercraft and makes recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Ensures the Watercraft Safety Committee membership is representative of national capabilities and regional science centers as well as the USGS Watercraft Safety Program Manager, Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers, and the USGS OSHMB designee, with at least two-thirds of the members being DOI-certified motorboat operators. Ensures meetings are held quarterly, with agenda and minutes published.

(8)  Coordinates the establishment and conduct National Center, Denver Federal Center, and Menlo Park location-specific occupational safety and health committees and activities. Ensures meetings are held quarterly, with agenda and minutes published. Serves as or designates the chair and provides administrative support for the subject committees.

(9)  Assists mission area management, Points of Contact, and CDSPCs at geographically dispersed centers; e.g., Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility, National Water Quality Laboratory, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center; in establishing local-level occupational safety and health committees in accordance with the requirements of this chapter to facilitate implementation and compliance with occupational safety and health program requirements.

(10)  Conducts monthly meetings or conference calls with respective mission area Points of Contacts and CDSPCs to identify and address occupational safety and health program needs, incorporating a review of self-audit and external inspection reports, abatement logs, accident history and rates, training programs, and reports of hazardous conditions to address program gaps and develop initiatives for continuous improvement.

(11)  Publishes and distributes mission area meeting or conference-call agendas and minutes.

(12)  Coordinates mission area review and comment on USGS policies, standards, and processes, as appropriate.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Assist regional science center managers and CDSPCs in establishing effective field-level occupational safety and health committees that facilitate implementation and compliance with occupational safety and health program requirements.

(2)  Conduct monthly meetings or conference calls with their respective regional science center CDSPCs to identify and address field needs, incorporating a review of self-audit and external inspection reports, abatement logs, accident history and rates, training programs, and reports of hazardous conditions to address program gaps and develop initiatives for continuous improvement.

(3)  Publish and distribute CDSPC meeting or conference-call agendas and minutes.

(4)  Monitor operations, performance, and resources of regional and local occupational safety and health program implementation and communicate regional and local occupational safety and health needs and recommendations to the Regional Director and regional staff, USGS OSH Program Manager, or OSH Council, as appropriate.

(5)  Coordinate regional science center review and comments on OSH policies, standards, and processes, as appropriate.

(6)  Actively participate in the OSH Council.

G.  Local Management, Collateral Duty, and Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Local management or the CDSPC chairs the local committee, with membership supplemented by appropriate science center management and non-management positions.

(2)  Assist in effective implementation of the occupational safety and health program at their respective establishment level, by reviewing the policies and making recommendations for safe operations of the program.

(3)  Monitor findings and reports of workplace inspections to ensure that appropriate corrective measures are implemented.

(4) Participate in inspections of the establishment when requested by organizational management or when the committee deems it necessary for effective monitoring of established inspection procedures.

(5)  Review internal and external evaluation reports and make recommendations concerning the implementation of occupational safety and health programs.

(6)  Review and recommend changes to procedures for handling occupational safety and health suggestions and recommendations from employees, as appropriate.

(7)  Establish local procedures for the safety of employees as appropriate or when the committee deems it necessary.

(8)  Monitor and recommend changes, as required, in the level of resources allocated and spent on the occupational safety and health program.

(9)  Review organizational responses to reports of hazardous conditions, program deficiencies, and allegations of reprisal.

(10)  Assist supervisors in the development of local safety plans covering organizational facility layout, activities, environmental factors, and emergency procedures that are non-duplicative of other pertinent instructions and contain complete instructions for emergencies, precautionary measures concerning any unabated hazards or situations unique to the station, safe procedures and techniques for station activities, provision for assisting the visiting public, and other appropriate matters, in conjunction with the CDSPC, Chemical Hygiene Officer, supervisors, and employees.

(11)  Annually review and/or coordinate the review of the local safety plan and update as necessary. If a local committee is not established, the organizational CDSPC assumes this responsibility.

(12)  Review and analyze local science center accidents and recommend changes to operating procedures to prevent future accidents.

 

 

Katherine M. McCulloch                                                                                      04/02/19
___________________________________________                                  _______________

Katherine M. McCulloch                                                                                      Date                                             

Designated Agency Safety and Health Official 

 

 

CHAPTER 10

Occupational Safety and Health Program Awards

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to incorporate new Department of the Interior (DOI) award criteria for occupational safety and health recognition.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum requirements for the administration of an Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) awards program that recognizes and rewards organizations, groups, and individuals for their OSH contributions and encourages safety and behavior that facilitates to the overall well-being of employees, volunteers, and visitors.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  5 U.S.C. Chapters 43 and 45.

B.  5 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 430 and 451.

C.  29 CFR 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters.

D.  DOI Manual 485 DM 10, Safety Management Awards.

E.  National Safety Council (NSC), Accident Prevention Manual for Business and Industry, Administration and Programs, 11th Edition.

F.  American National Standards Institute/American Industrial Hygiene Association (ANSI/AIHA) Z10-2012, OSH Management Systems.

G.  U.S. Geological Survey Honor Awards Guide, dated 5/15/2014.

 

3.  Definitions.

A.  Employee.  Any permanent or volunteer staff member.

B.  Awards Committee.  The Bureau OSH Council shall serve as the subject committee.

 

4.  Awards.

A.  The DOI Occupational Safety and Health Award of Excellence.  This award is presented annually by the Secretary of the Interior at the DOI Honor Awards Convocation and is the highest level of occupational safety and health award granted by the DOI.  The OSH Award of Excellence recognizes individuals or organizations that performed an outstanding service for or made a contribution of unusual value to the occupational safety and health of employees, visitors, and volunteers.  The accomplishments of the individual or organization contribute toward the establishment of a safe and healthful environment within the DOI that builds a culture that will move it toward the goal of zero loss to personnel and material resources. 

B.  The USGS Occupational Safety and Health Award of Merit.  This award is the highest award bestowed by the bureau for outstanding OSH achievement.  The OSH Award of Merit recognizes and demonstrates management’s high regard for USGS employees who have made significant contributions toward the achievement of positive results in the advancement of occupational safety and health.  The accomplishments of the individual or organization contribute toward the establishment of a safe and healthful environment that in turn contributes to a culture that will move the USGS toward the goal of zero loss to personnel and material resources. 

C.  The Gary L. Hill Watercraft Safety Award.  This award is presented to those that have made significant contributions towards the enhancement of the USGS watercraft safety program. 

 

5.  DOI OSH Award of Excellence and USGS OSH Award of Merit.  Criteria provide standards for recognition of outstanding occupational safety and health performance.  Nominees have demonstrated outstanding performance and produced significant results that align with one or more of the DOI or the USGS OSH Strategic Plan goals below:

A.  DOI Occupational Safety and Health Strategic Plan Goals.

(1)  Enhance the Role of Leadership and Management in Promoting a Culture of Safety.  Ensures that executives and managers are aware of their roles and responsibilities for implementation of the OSH Program.

(2)  Enhance Employee Participation and Engagement in Achieving Occupational Safety and Health Commitments.  Provides a work environment that supports employee involvement in the OSH Program.

(3)  Prevent Exposure to Hazards and Mitigating Risk through Recognition and Prevention Programs/Processes.  Improves OSH hazard identification processes and responses to hazards.

(4)  Enhance Internal Evaluation and Analysis Processes to Validate the Effectiveness of the Safety and Health Program.  Implements an internal OSH program evaluation process to assess and validate the effectiveness of the program which incorporates senior management-level reviews and follow-up actions to ensure that continuous improvement is attained and sustained.

(5)  Improve Occupational Safety and Health Training and Awareness throughout the USGS.  Identify, develop, and provide employees with OSH training inclusive of rights, roles, and responsibilities; hazard recognition and control principles and practices; selection and use of personal protective equipment; and job-specific safety and health training congruent with associated employee work operations and/or assigned tasks.

(6)  Implement and Continuously Improve the Occupational Safety and Health Program.  Implement a developed OSH program, appropriate for the size and nature of the work and associated hazards, and for which all employees, from senior management to the individual field worker, are knowledgeable of applicable policies, standards, procedures, and other program information to assure effective application throughout all levels of the DOI.

B.  USGS Occupational Safety and Health Strategic Plan Goals.

(1)  Enhance the Role of Leadership in Promoting a Culture of Safety.  Ensures that executives and managers are aware of their roles and responsibilities for implementation of the OSH program.

(2)  Engage Employees in Reaching Safety and Health Commitments.  Provides a work environment that supports employee involvement in the OSH program.

(3)  Prevent Exposure to Hazards and Mitigate Risk to our Employees.  Improves safety and health hazard identification processes and responses to hazards.

(4)  Meet or Exceed all Federal Safety and Health Regulations and Requirements.  Commits to implement a comprehensive OSH program in accordance with guidance in the DOI Manual 485.

 

6.  USGS Gary L. Hill Watercraft Safety Award Criteria.  Criteria provide standards for recognition of outstanding occupational safety and health performance related to the watercraft safety arena.  Nominees have demonstrated outstanding performance and produced significant results through development or contribution of safe work practices associated with watercraft operations; the conduct of effective training and/or implementation of watercraft safety requirements; or by providing exceptional customer service to watercraft stakeholders and those that use watercraft to perform work activities.

 

7.  Eligibility.  All USGS employees, volunteers, and organizational components are eligible nominees for these awards, either individually or collectively.

 

8.  Nomination, Approval, and Presentation Process.

A.  All USGS nominations for the OSH Award of Merit shall be prepared on a DI-451, United States Department of the Interior Recommendation and Approval of Awards, and submitted by local managers to their USGS Honor Awards Coordinator by October 1 of each year.

B.  Any employee may submit a nomination, but the nomination and supporting documents must be prepared and submitted through supervisory channels to the appropriate USGS Honor Awards Coordinator for review.

C.  Award nominations received by the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator will be forwarded to the OSH Program Manager to coordinate review/concurrence for Bureau recognition by the Bureau OSH Council.  Those deserving of DOI recognition, as determined by the Bureau OSH Council, shall be forwarded back to the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator, no later than October 31st of each year, for submittal to the DOI Honor Awards Coordinator as a DOI OSH Award of Excellence nomination.

D.  The OSH Program Manager and (or) OSH Management Branch (OSHMB) staff will assist the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator by reviewing award narratives for accuracy.

E.  Bureau nominations approved for DOI recognition are presented at the DOI Honor Awards Convocation.   

F.  Approved USGS awards are presented at the USGS Awards Convocation or an alternative venue determined by the awardee’s Associate Director.  The OSHMB will be responsible for USGS award commendation letters, plaques, and presentations in coordination with the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator.  Travel for individuals to attend the DOI Honor Awards Convocation ceremony is the responsibility of each employee’s cost center.

G.  The DOI award is a plaque with a medallion and certificate presented at the DOI Honor Awards Convocation by the Secretary or designee.  The USGS award is a plaque with a medallion and certificate/plaque, presented at the USGS Awards Convocation by the Director or designee.

H.  A suggested incentive is a time-off award of up to 2 days at the discretion of the nominating official and/or a cash award ranging from $2,500-$5,000.

 

9.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director and Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Support the DOI awards program and ensure that an OSH awards program is established within the USGS.

(2)  Appropriately fund the OSH recognition program.

(3)  Annually submit award nominations to the DOI Honor Awards Coordinator and DOI Safety and Health Council. 

(4)  Establish mechanisms, such as an awards committee, to ensure that a consistent approach is applied in the review, evaluation, and recommendation of the award nomination.  These mechanisms should also provide oversight of equity and cultural diversity to ensure that employees at all levels of the organization, who meet the high standards required for these honors, are considered for the awards.

B.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Council.

(1)  Reviews nominations provided by the DOI or USGS Honor Awards Coordinator.

(2)  Recommends award recipients to the DOI or USGS Honor Awards Coordinator and the DOI OSH Council.

C.  USGS Honor Awards Coordinator.

(1)  Solicits nominations through announcements of awards, criteria, and timelines for submittal and receives OSH award nominations.

(2)  Coordinates nominations for DOI-level recognition through the OSH Program Manager for review and concurrence.

(3)  Forwards nominations through the Director, the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science and the Executive Secretariat to the Department Honor Awards Coordinator for DOI-level recognition.

D.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Promotes DOI and USGS OSH awards programs.

(2)  Establishes policy for a USGS-wide incentive and recognition program for outstanding OSH achievement of individuals or organizations.

(3)  Ensures that the Bureau OSH Council reviews and concurs on DOI and USGS OSH award nominations.

(4)  Reviews OSH award write-ups for accuracy and provides suggested changes back to the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator.

(5)  Assists the DOI and (or) USGS Honor Awards Coordinator with the convocation and other awards ceremonies, upon request.

(6)  Coordinates USGS award commendation letters, plaques, and presentation forums for OSH awards.

(7)  Forwards DOI nominations and USGS award plaques and letters to the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator for submittal to the DOI or for presentation during USGS award forums.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch and Regional OSH Staff.

(1)  Promote DOI and USGS OSH awards programs.

(2)  Ensure USGS OSH award nomination review and concurrence by organizational management of the nominee prior to forwarding to the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator.

F.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.  Promote participation in DOI and USGS recognition programs for outstanding OSH achievements of individuals and groups within their respective areas of responsibility, inclusive of nominations to the USGS Honor Awards Coordinator through the appropriate Regional Safety Manager, or for mission areas or office organizations, through the respective OSHMB National Program Section Chief, for additional recognition at the USGS and DOI levels.

 

/s/ Roseann Gonzales                                                                              April 3, 2018
_________________________________                                          _____________________
Roseann Gonzales                                                                                  Date
Associate Director for Administration
Designated Agency Safety and Health official

 

 

CHAPTER 11

Staffing Safety And Health Positions

 

1.  Purpose. To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for staffing safety and health positions within the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS).

 

2.  Reference. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Personnel Qualification Standards Series 018, 019, and 803.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  USGS full-time safety and health members will have the appropriate OPM qualifications for their assigned duties.

B.  USGS Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO) will assure that the Bureau Safety and Health Program Manager and other technical staff meet, as a minimum, the OPM qualifications for GM-018/019/803, as appropriate.  The Bureau Safety and Health Program Manager, or a qualified designee, will serve as the subject matter expert to review applicants for all Bureau headquarters full-time professional safety and health position vacancies.

C.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) will be trained, within six (6) months of appointment, in the basic elements of organizing, planning, and managing an effective safety and health program, unless they have had the training/experience within the last 3 years.  In addition to general orientation training within 6 months of appointment, CDSPCs are required to complete 16 hours of annual training in accordance with Chapter 14.4 of this Handbook.  (See Chapters 12, 13, and 14 of this Handbook for specific orientation and professional development and training requirements for CDSPCs.)

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A. Bureau DASHO.  Assures that the Bureau Safety and Health Program Manager and other technical staff meet, as a minimum, the OPM qualifications for GM-018/019/803, as appropriate.

B.  Bureau Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Serves as the Bureau DASHO designee within the USGS and as the subject matter expert to review applicants for full-time Bureau headquarters Safety and Health Management Branch position vacancies.

(2)  Establishes professional certification programs for full-time and collateral duty safety and health staff

(3)  Identifies the standard training content for use in meeting Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator instruction to meet the Department requirement as outlined in paragraph 3C above.

C.  Regional Safety and Health Program Managers.

(1)  Serve as the Regional Safety and Health Program Manager subject matter experts to review applicants for all regional full-time regional safety and health position vacancies.

(2)  Regional Safety and Health Program Managers, with assistance from respective regional safety and health staff, shall be responsible for coordinating training mentioned in paragraph 3C above within each region, as appropriate.  (See Chapter 13 of this Handbook for specific training requirements.)

 

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker_____________                                    February 19, 2008
Karen D. Baker                                                                   Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 12

Professional Development

Instructions:  To update this chapter to reflect requirements in the Training and Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook released by the Department of the Interior in FY 2007.

 

1.  Purpose. To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for developing and administering a formal career development program for the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) full-time and collateral duty safety and health personnel.

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1960, "Basic Program Elements for Federal Employees”, Subpart H "Training”.

B.  Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Technical Standard 227, “Qualification Standard for Administration, Management, and Specialist Positions.”

C.  Department of the Interior, Office of Occupational Health and Safety, Training and Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook.

 

3.  Responsibilities:

A.  DOI Office of Occupational Health and Safety.

(1)  Identifies, by series, grade, and position, the minimum knowledge, skills, and abilities to fully perform the functions of each generic position in the Department.

(2)  Identifies appropriate training courses/experiences and available sources to satisfy these knowledge and skill needs.

(3)  Establishes individual development plans (IDPs) for Occupational Health and Safety personnel and maintains records of their training.

B.  Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services.

(1)  Ensures establishment of career development programs for full-time and collateral duty safety and health personnel.

(2)  Provides support and funding resources necessary to equip safety and health personnel with training needed to fulfill their responsibilities and meet professional development requirements.

C.  Safety and Health Management Branch (SHMB).

(1)  Establish career development programs that enable full-time and collateral duty occupational safety and health personnel to acquire the knowledge, skills, and abilities that meet present and future program needs of the Bureau and prepare them to perform necessary technical monitoring, consulting, testing, inspecting, and designing; hazard recognition, evaluation, and control; equipment and facility design and standards; analysis of accident, injury, and illness data; and other safety- and health-related tasks.

(2)  Identify specific/special knowledge, skills, and abilities required for safety and health positions and special training needs of safety and health personnel.

(3)  Promotes professional development through the establishment of mandatory curricula for career development of full-time safety and health personnel that correspond to the courses detailed in the DOI Training and Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook.  Specific USGS mandated training for full-time safety and health personnel is detailed in Appendix 12-1, Mandatory Career Development Requirements for USGS Full-Time Safety and Health Personnel.”  Completion of training courses detailed in this appendix is considered a minimum requirement.

(a)  USGS full-time safety and health personnel have up to 6 years to complete all the mandatory training requirements.  First-year requirements may be met by completing cost-free, online training hosted in the DOI Learning Management System.

(b)  Credit may be given for equivalent courses completed prior to the establishment of this career development program or those completed through prior employment outside the USGS.  Substitutions for required courses shall be forwarded to the Bureau Safety and Health Management Branch for approval. 

(c)  Professional certifications obtained by full-time safety and health staff through private organizations may be recognized as meeting these training requirements; e.g., Associate or Certified Safety and Health Professional issued by the Board of Certified Safety Professionals; Certified Industrial Hygienist through the American Board of Industrial Hygiene; or Certified Safety and Health Manager from the Institute for Safety and Health Management.

(d)  Professional certifications must be current, with associated documentation provided to the Bureau Safety and Health Program Manager for approval that they meet part or all of the mandated career development requirements.

(4)  Coordinates the establishment of professional training courses through the use of cooperative agreements with external training vendors, as appropriate, to facilitate instructional offerings that meet mandatory and recommended career development needs.

(5)  Promotes professional development through the establishment of a recommended professional development training program for collateral duty safety program coordinators that corresponds to those courses detailed in the DOI Training and Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook.

D.  Chiefs, Headquarters and Regional Offices of Management Services.

(1)  Provide primary funding resources necessary to equip the safety and health personnel with the training needed (up to the 24 hours per year as required by DOI) to fulfill their responsibilities and to meet individual mandatory career development requirements listed in Appendix 12-1.

(2)  Ensure IDPs, corresponding to the career development curricula detailed in Appendix 12-1, as a minimum, are developed and maintained for safety and health personnel.  Appendix 12-1 may be used for this purpose.

(3)  Ensure that Appendix 12-1 is completed for each full-time safety and health staff member to document individual mandatory training completions and completion dates.  Appendices and associated transcripts/course completion certificates for each full-time safety and health staff member shall be maintained locally.  A copy of all documentation shall be forwarded to the Bureau Safety and Health Management Branch not later than September 30 of each fiscal year.

(4)  Encourage subordinate safety and health professionals to participate in local field Federal Safety Council activities, as applicable.

E.  All Full-Time Safety and Health Staff.

Document and annually update mandatory safety and health career development training completions and completion dates using Appendix 12-1.  Maintain a hard copy of Appendix 12-1 and associated transcripts/course completion certificates and forward a copy of all documentation to the Bureau Safety and Health Management Branch not later than September 30 of each fiscal year until all courses are completed.

Upon formally completing the USGS required mandatory training, complete a minimum of 24 hours per year (DOI requirement) of career development courses in occupational safety and health training from the expanded list of courses within the DOI Safety Training and Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook, Appendix A.  Attendance at the DOI Safety and Health Seminar may be used to meet this requirement.

Appendix 12-1: Mandatory Career Development Requirements for USGS Full-Time Safety and Health Personnel

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                      7/22/08
______________________________________                        ____________
Karen D. Baker                                                                           Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 13

Collateral Duty Safety and Occupational Health Program Coordinator

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for establishing and maintaining appropriate Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) Collateral Duty Safety and Occupational Health Officer (CDSHO) resources.  The USGS title for individuals performing collateral duty safety and occupational health functions is Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC).

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1960.25, Qualifications of Safety and Health Inspectors and Agency Inspections.

B.  29 CFR 1960.58, Training of Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator and Health Personnel and Committee Members.

C.  485 DM, Chapter 1, Authority, Purpose, and Policy.

D.  485 DM, Chapter 11, Staffing Safety and Health Positions.

E.  485 DM, Chapter 13, Safety and Health Training.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  The USGS will establish and maintain a staff of safety and occupational health professionals, both on a full-time and collateral-duty basis, at appropriate levels, to advise management in the development and implementation of an effective safety and occupational health program.

B.  The USGS will develop and maintain a written CDSPC program sufficient to satisfy the requirements and intent of applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Departmental requirements as identified in the references cited in Section 2 of this chapter.

C.  The CDSPCs will devote a minimum of 10 percent of duty time to occupational safety and health program responsibilities; however, if local safety and health program needs require additional time to achieve compliance, managers must ensure that CDSPCs are authorized the necessary duty time for that purpose.

D.  Qualifications.

(1)  The CDSPCs will be adequately equipped and competent to recognize and evaluate hazards of the working environment and to suggest general abatement procedures.  In this case, competent is defined as possessing the skills, knowledge, experience, and judgment to perform assigned tasks or activities satisfactorily, as determined by the organization.  Experience and/or up-to-date training in occupational safety and health hazard recognition and evaluation should be considered in meeting this requirement.

(2)  Training.

(a) All newly appointed CDSPCs shall complete, within 90 days of appointment, the following modules, available through the DOI Learning Management System, to meet the safety and health orientation training requirements:

(i)    DOI Safety and Occupational Health Overview.

(ii)    Authorities, Roles and Responsibilities.

(iii)   Resources, References and Standards.

(iv)  USGS Safety and Health Program Overview.

(v)    USGS Introduction to the Safe Behavior Process.

(vi)  USGS Safety Program Requirements.

(vii) USGS Industrial Hygiene Program.

(b)  Within 6 months of appointment, the CDSPC will be provided training that includes the Department and USGS occupational safety and health programs, Section 19 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Executive Order 12196, and 29 CFR 1960; procedures for reporting, evaluating, and abatement of hazards; procedures for reporting and investigating allegations of reprisal; the recognition of hazardous conditions and environments; identification and use of occupational safety and health standards; and other appropriate rules and regulations.  This training may be met by taking online courses available through the DOI Learning Management System.

(c)  CDSPCs will also be trained in the basic elements of organizing, planning, and managing an effective safety and health program. An exception is when the CDSPC has had the required training within the last 3 years.

(d)  CDSPCs will complete a minimum of 16 hours of annual training after the first year of appointment.  See the Department of the Interior Safety and Health Training, Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook, Appendix A, “Safety and Occupational Health Program Training Topics and Resources,” for recommended training and resources that meet the intent of this requirement. 

E.  CDSPC Certification. The USGS has established a voluntary certification program for CDSPCs as detailed in the Department of the Interior Safety and Health Training, Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook.  To receive official USGS certification, CDSPCs may submit transcripts of training documentation to the Bureau Safety and Health Management Branch.

F.  Position Description. CDSPC position descriptions will appropriately describe assigned duties.  A list of duties and associated knowledge, skills, and abilities are detailed within the Department of the Interior Safety and Health Training, Technical Skills and Abilities for Collateral Duty and Full Time Safety Personnel Handbook.

G.  Equipment and Resources. CDSPCs shall be provided with adequate and appropriate equipment and resources to perform their assigned duties. Minimum equipment availability for the CDSPC to perform his/her duties will vary depending on location and local operations. CDSPCs should consult with their respective regional staff for equipment available for loan; e.g., air and noise monitors, training videos, etc. A list of suggested CDSPC HQ library and reference materials is provided in Appendix 13-1, “CDSPC HQ Suggested Library and Reference Materials.”

Appendix 13-1: Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator Suggested Library and Reference Materials

Appendix 13-2: Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC) Suggested Training Resources

Appendix 13-3: CDSPC Suggested Position Description Elements

 

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                   February 14, 2008
______________________________________                    _______________
Karen D. Baker                                                                       Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 14

 

Safety and Health Training

Instruction.  Changes to this chapter were made so that the requirements match the requirements in the referenced chapters and in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations.  The Web-based safety orientation training requirements were included.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum requirements for safety and health training for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and employee representatives.

 

2.  Scope.  This policy applies to USGS employees and individuals under personal services contracts (e.g., student services acquired under purchase orders citing 43 USC 50d as authority for the award).  All other contractor employees are responsible for following the policies of their employer.

 

3.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1960, Subpart H, Training.

B.  OSHA Publication 2254, Training Requirements in OSHA Standards and Training Guidelines.

 

4.  Requirements.  The USGS will develop and implement safety and health training plans that encompasses the following:

A.  Employees will receive orientation training in the safety and health program, including their rights and responsibilities and information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Executive Order 12196, 29 CFR 1960, this document, and other applicable regulations.  Safety orientation is an initial, one-time training requirement.  The following groups of employees are required to complete initial safety and health orientation training:

(1)  Executives (GS-14 and above).

(2)  Supervisors (GS-13 and below).

(3)  Employees with non-administrative duties (e.g., working in non-administrative areas in the field or laboratories).

(4)  Employees with administrative duties (e.g., working in administrative areas).

(5)  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

B.  USGS employees must be given specialized on-the-job or classroom training to provide them with the knowledge and skills to perform hazardous work activities safely and to respond effectively to fires, injuries, or other types of emergencies.  For high-hazard tasks (e.g., using explosives), certification must be carried out by certified examiners. 

C.  Records documenting formal classroom training and certification for high-hazard activities must be maintained at least 5 years. Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPC) and occupational health officers and supervisors will be given appropriate hazard recognition training within 6 months of being selected for the task.  Safety and health committee members should be given similar training.

D.  Formal training and certification programs will be evaluated periodically.

 

5.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator Training.

A.  Regional Safety Manager or the Regional Safety Officer shall provide CDSPCs with an orientation to the USGS safety program within 90 days of their appointment to the position.  This orientation will review basic duties and responsibilities, organization, available resources, and USGS safety policies.  This can be met through online USGS CDSPC Orientation Training hosted within the DOI Learning Management System.

B.  A USGS safety orientation package has been developed by the Bureau Safety Manager and the Regional Safety Managers to facilitate meeting this requirement.

C.  Within 6 months of appointment, CDSPCs shall receive a minimum of 24 hours of additional training from one of the following sources:

(1)  OSHA Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator/Officer Course 600, 6000, or equivalent.

(2)  DOI Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator/Officer Course.

(3)  OSHA sanctioned 10-hour 1910/1926 Standard Overview Course.

(4)  DOI Annual Safety and Health Seminar.

(5)  CDSPC training conducted or sponsored by the Regional Safety Manager or Regional Safety Officer and approved by the Bureau Safety Manager.

(6)  Any basic safety management course offered by an accredited college, university, or Federal agency.

(7)  Any safety management seminar or class sponsored by a professional safety organization (e.g., American Society of Safety Engineers).

D.  After the initial 24 hours of formal training, CDSPCs shall receive a minimum of 16 hours per year of additional formal safety training.

E.  The Department’s Safety and Occupational Health Seminar will provide training for full-time and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators, health officers, managers, supervisors, employees, and employee representatives.

 

6.  Employee Training Requirements (see Appendix 14-1).

A. Access to employee exposure and medical records.  Annually, employees must be informed how and where to access medical and exposure records in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020.

B. Animal Awareness.  Employees working in field locations where dangerous wild animals may be encountered shall receive animal awareness and avoidance training.  Training shall include: types of dangerous wild animals, behavioral traits, recognition of signs of animal activity, how to avoid attracting or provoking, and how to react if attacked.  Training shall be provided before work begins in such locations and at least every 3 years thereafter.

C. Asbestos.  Employees who perform housekeeping activities in public and commercial buildings who may be exposed to asbestos fibers must receive awareness training annually.  Employees who repair and perform maintenance operations where asbestos- containing materials or presumed asbestos-containing materials are likely to be disturbed must receive training that is consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency requirements for the training of local education agency maintenance and custodial staff as set forth at 40 CFR 763.92(a)(2).

D. Aviation Training.  Employees whose work assignments involve transportation in noncommercial aircraft shall receive initial training prior to the first such flight and refresher training every 3 years as specified by the Aviation Management Directorate of the National Business Center and Chapter 27 of this Handbook.

E. Bloodborne Pathogens.  Designated first-aid providers will receive training upon initial assignment and annually thereafter in the hazards and prevention of exposure to bloodborne pathogens.  This training may be in conjunction with first aid or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training.  All designated first-aid responders shall also be provided with appropriate personal protective equipment.  If they render assistance in a first-aid accident, they shall be offered the hepatitis B vaccine within 24 hours.  Should first-aid responders experience exposure to bloodborne pathogens (e.g., a splash to the eyes or exposure of mucous membranes), they shall be provided with follow-up medical evaluations.  See Chapter 25 of this Handbook for specifics.

F. Cableway Safety.  Employees who use cableways to measure or sample, employees who inspect cableways, and employees who serve as regional cableway experts will receive training as specified in Chapter 41 of this Handbook.

G. Confined Space Entry.  Employees who enter confined spaces or serve as attendants or rescuers shall receive training prior to performance of confined space entry duties as required and described in Chapter 40 of this Handbook.

H. Excavations.  Employees who are responsible for monitoring and inspecting excavations and for analyzing soil types (e.g., the competent person) must initially be trained in excavation standards, hazards, protective systems, and methods of testing soils and retrained when changes occur.

I. Defensive Driving.  Employees who operate any type of motor vehicle in the performance of official duties shall receive defensive driving training.  Specific requirements may be found in Chapter 16 of this Handbook.

J. Electrical Safety.  Employees whose work involves risk of injury due to electrical shock or other electrical hazards will be trained in the safety-related work practices required by 29 CFR1910.333 through 1910.335.  Employees who are permitted to work on or near exposed energized parts will be trained in the skills and techniques necessary to distinguish exposed live parts from other parts of electric equipment, the skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts, the clearance distances specified in 29 CFR1910.333 (c)(3)(ii)(C), and the corresponding voltages to which the qualified employee will be exposed.

K.  Emergency Response Hazardous Material Spill Containment and Cleanup.  Employees designated to take defensive measures or contain hazardous material spills shall receive first responder operational level certification as defined by OSHA (see 29 CFR 1910.120).  A minimum of 8 hours of training is required. Employees who are members of organized USGS spill teams shall receive training appropriate for the tasks to be completed as part of the emergency response.  Employees assigned to entry team or decontamination duties shall be certified to the hazardous materials technician level as specified by OSHA (see 29 CFR 1910.120). A minimum of 24 hours of training is required.  Employees assigned to support roles during a hazardous materials response shall receive certification to at least the first responder operational level as defined by OSHA.  Eight hours of refresher training shall be provided to employees of organized USGS spill teams annually as a minimum.  Employees shall not attempt clean up of any hazardous material spill without appropriate training, personal protective and clean-up equipment, and knowledge of the hazards.  The amount spilled, degree of toxicity, and resources available to clean up the spill must be properly evaluated.

L.  Explosives.  Employees whose work involves proximity to or handling of explosives shall receive a minimum of 24 hours of basic explosives safety, with refresher training provided annually as described in Chapter 38 of this Handbook.  Topics shall include hazards of each class of explosives, dangers of static electricity, storage and transportation requirements, initiation devices, and personal protective devices.

M.  Fall Protection.  Employees whose duties may expose them to falls of 4 feet or more to a surface below or to dangerous machinery at any height should be trained in the nature of fall hazards in the work area.  Employees who use personal fall arrest systems and those who assemble scaffolds need additional instruction.  See Chapter 44 of this Handbook for specifics.

N.  Field Safety.  Employees who conduct work where the location of the work is greater than 15 minutes from professional medical services should receive training in basic first aid and CPR.  For locations where medical services are greater than 1 hour away, employees shall also have advanced first-aid or wilderness first-aid training.  Where multiple employees are assigned to a specific field location, at least two shall be certified in first aid and CPR.  Employees shall receive additional training commensurate with the fieldwork location.  Training to address hazards associated with extreme temperatures, coldwater survival, wilderness conditions, and high altitude shall be given to employees likely to encounter these conditions.  Field hazard training shall be conducted upon initial employment and every 3 years thereafter.

O.  Fire Extinguisher.  Employees who are expected to use fire extinguishers should have annual “hands-on” fire-extinguisher training.  Such training can usually be obtained from the local fire department.  See Chapter 36 this Handbook for specifics.

P.  Firearms.  No employee shall be issued a firearm or be permitted to use personal firearms unless a certificate of need has been authorized by the employee’s supervisor, and the employee has met all firearms training requirements as described in Chapter 29 of this Handbook.

Q.  First Aid (Basic, Advanced, or Wilderness) and CPR.  Employees conducting field work shall receive basic first-aid and CPR training.  Employees shall receive first-aid refresher training every 3 years and CPR refresher training annually or as required by the organization administering the training and certification program (e.g., American Red Cross).

R.  Hazard Communication.  Employees who may be exposed to hazardous chemicals under normal conditions of use or in a foreseeable emergency shall receive initial Hazard Communication Training with refresher training every 3 years (see Chapter 20).

S.  Hazardous Environments.  Training shall be provided to all employees working in hazardous environments to enable them to deal with the problems and working environments they may encounter.  Training activities will include but are not limited to the following:

(1)  Arctic Survival.

(2)  Electrofishing.

(3)  Swift-Water Activities.

(4)  In-Around Water/Ice Covered Water Locations.

(5)  Rocketnetting/Blasting Operations.

(6)  Fire Fighting.

(7)  High-Heat Work Environments (heat stress).

(8)  Powder-Actuated Equipment.

(9)  Rock Climbing and Repelling.

(10)  Specialized Vehicle Operators: watercraft, airboats, hovercraft, personal watercraft, water, garbage and heavy trucks, snow machines/mobiles, tracked vehicles, and mowers.

(11)  Stationary or Mobile Machinery and Equipment.

(12)  Biological Hazards (e.g., zoonotic diseases).

T.  Hazardous Materials (Shipping, Receiving, Packaging).  Employees who package, ship, or receive hazardous materials as classified by the Department of Transportation must receive training in the hazards, including correct procedures, forms, and precautions.

U.  Hazardous Waste Generators.  The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requires any facility that generates hazardous-waste (HW) to provide all employees, who handle HW, training on emergency procedures, systems, and equipment.  Annual refresher training is required after the initial training is completed. (See USGS Environmental Management and Compliance Requirements Handbook, 445-1-H.)

V.  Hazardous-Waste Sites.  Employees entering any hazardous-waste site must receive training as required by OSHA prior to initial assignment and annually thereafter (see 29 CFR 1910.120). Only employees listed on approved site plans will be allowed to perform work on hazardous-waste sites.

W.  Hearing Conservation (Noise). Employees in a Hearing Conservation Program will receive annual training in accordance with Chapter 19 of this Handbook.

X.  Laboratory Safety (Chemical Hygiene). Employees using hazardous materials in a laboratory environment shall receive chemical-hygiene training as described in Chapter 21 of this Handbook, with refresher training every 3 years.

Y.  Liquid Propane Gas.  Employees who perform installation, removal, operation, or maintenance work on liquid propane gas systems will receive training in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.110.

Z.  Lockout/Tagout.  Employees who lockout or tagout machines or equipment in order to perform servicing or maintenance on that machine or equipment shall be trained in the requirements of lockout/tagout procedures as described in Chapter 37 of this Handbook. 

AA.  Logging (Chain Saws).  Employees assigned to operate chain saws will be trained in their safe use and maintenance in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.266.

BB.  Machine-ShopWoodworking and Portable Power Tools.  Supervisors shall certify that employees are experienced and knowledgeable in the safe operation of machine-shop tools, portable power tools, and other equipment prior to operating such equipment.  New employees should serve an apprenticeship or receive formal training under an experienced senior employee before unsupervised use of power tools and equipment.  Refresher certification or formal training is required every 3 years.

CC.  Materials Handling (Manual Lifting).  Employees required to routinely lift objects of greater than 35 pounds as part of their job assignment shall be instructed in proper lifting techniques, proper back care, and exercises upon initial assignment and every 3 years thereafter.

DD.  Materials Handling (Powered Industrial Trucks).  Employees who use manual or motorized forklift trucks shall have supervisory authorization and receive initial training in their operation and refresher training every 3 years.

EE.  Mines.  Employees shall not enter any active mine without the written approval of the mine owner and shall receive training to meet 30 CFR (Mine Safety and Health Administration) requirements.  If employees are to work in abandoned mines, they shall receive training in how to test for oxygen content of the air, toxic or explosive atmospheres, and roof and wall integrity.

FF.  Occupant Emergency Plan (OEP) and Fire Protection and Prevention.  Employees who serve in emergency evacuation positions such as floor, area, stairwell, or elevator monitors shall receive training on the elements of the OEP plan and basic emergency-evacuation procedures for the facility.  Length of training should be commensurate with the scope and complexity of the OEP.  All employees shall receive training in the facility’s OEP, including at least one evacuation drill per year and training covering basic fire prevention.

GG.  Over-the-Water Activities.  All employees who perform duties in this environment will receive safety training that includes the use of job-hazard analyses, the proper care of personal flotation devices (PFD), and in-the-water training simulating the use of PFDs.  Training must be provided prior to the initial over-the-water work assignment and refresher training provided every 5 years.  The office responsible for the work of these employees will conduct the training.  In-the-water training is to be conducted in a controlled environment.  The In and Around Water/Ice Covered Water Location Safety Training Instructional Guidebook developed by the Water Resources South Dakota Office is provided as a minimum syllabus for over-the-water activities safety training.  This manual is a guide for preparing a basic training program.  Additional training specific to local operating procedures and practices is encouraged. Training sessions may also be supplemented with programs on swimming skills assessment, motorboat-operator certification, water survival, CPR, or water rescue.  (See Appendix 14-2.)

HH.  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).  Employees who are required to wear personal protective equipment, based on a job hazard analysis (see Chapter 15 of this Handbook), will be trained to know when PPE is necessary; what PPE is necessary; how to properly don, doff, adjust, and wear PPE; the limitations of the PPE; and the proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the PPE.  Training will be as described in Chapter 26 of this Handbook.

II.  Process Safety Management. In accordance with 29 CFR 1910.119, employees who perform work on sites covered by Process Safety Management (e.g., water- and waste-water treatment plants, oil refineries, chemical manufacturers) will be informed of the known potential fire, explosion, or toxic-release hazards related to the work and the process. The site employer will explain the applicable provisions of the site emergency-action plan.

JJ.  Radiation.  Employees who use Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensable ionizing radiation material shall receive appropriate training to maintain compliance with the NRC license authorizing the material and as described in Chapter 30 of this Handbook.  Employees who use X-ray-producing machines shall receive appropriate training as required by 29 CFR 1910.1096.  Employees who may be exposed to naturally occurring radiation in the course of their work should attend a course on the subject.

KK.  Respirator Training.  Employees who have the need to use respirators shall receive appropriate training and fit testing prior to use as described in Chapter 18 of this Handbook.

LL.  Underwater Diving.  Employees who conduct diving activities shall be certified and receive initial and refresher training as described in Chapter 28 of this Handbook.

MM.  Watercraft.  Employees operating any motorized watercraft shall receive initial training through the DOI Motorboat Operator Certification Course, with the appropriate refresher training every 5 years, inclusive of PFD information, as described in Chapter 31 of this Handbook.  Additionally, operators of Class 2 or larger vessels must comply with licensing requirements of the U. S. Coast Guard.

NN.  Welding, Cutting, and Brazing. Cutters or welders and their supervisors must be suitably trained in the safe operation of equipment and overall safety during the welding process.

OO.  Well Logger Training.  Supervisors are required to complete applicable training detailed within 10 CFR 39 in order to act as a supervisor of licensee activities.

 

7.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Develop an employee development plan (EDP) template for use within the USGS.

(2)  Develop a Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator EDP template for use within the USGS.

(3)  Assist regional safety managers in identifying, developing, or coordinating training

programs.

(4)  Develop a Bureau system for documenting and tracking safety and health training.

(5)  Promote cost effective means (e.g., Web-based/CD-ROM training) to assist regional and field components in meeting safety and health needs.  (See Core Competencies Appendix A for sources.)

B.  Regional Safety Managers and Officers.

(1)  Conduct or coordinate safety and health training within the regions such as Collateral Duty Safety Coordinator Training, Defensive Driving, and CPR/First Aid.

(2)  Assist field science program management in identification of resources to meet local training needs, as needed or requested.

(3)  Review regional and science program training in conjunction with annual program assessments to evaluate compliance and address existing and future field-specific training needs.

(4)  Assist the Bureau Safety and Health Management Branch in establishing a system to document and track safety and health training at all organizational levels.

C.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

This Handbook for all applicable employees under their control.

(2)  Document training accomplishments within the DOI Learning Management System.

(3)  Assist in the identification of additional employee safety training requirements through job hazard analyses or researching mandatory requirements employees must receive prior to carrying out unique job activities.

(4)  Certify that employees are experienced, knowledgeable, and technically qualified prior to assignment in potentially hazardous occupations (e.g., electrician, machinist) or operations (use of power tools, complex operations with high hazard materials) where employee safety may depend on skill.  New employees should serve an apprenticeship or receive formal training from experienced senior employees before allowing unsupervised performance of such tasks.  Conduct program orientation for all employees under their supervision.

(5)  Explain to new employees, during their first week on the job, the policies, rules, regulations, emergency procedures, and any special conditions peculiar to their working environment. Information will include the following:

(a)  Present and discuss USGS, regional, and local safety and health policies.

(b)  Identify and demonstrate safe working procedures related to employee responsibilities, carefully pointing out inherent hazards.

(c)  Discuss any physical limitations to be considered before assignment of duties.

(d)  Issue hard hats, gloves, or other employee protective equipment consistent with job hazard analysis.  Explain the proper use and how to acquire employee protective equipment.

(e)  Ensure required training is taken prior to assigning an employee to a task involving hazardous materials and potential exposures.

(6)  Obtain medical approval, fit testing, and training for employees required to don respirators.

(7)  Provide the following information to employees involved in motor vehicle or special purpose vehicle operations:

(a)  Authorized vehicle use.

(b)  Vehicle accident reporting kit (DOI Form DI-135).

(c)  Emergency equipment required.

(d)  Vehicle inspection procedures.

(8)  Provide the following information to all employees:

(a)  Accident reporting responsibility and reporting procedures.

(b)  Hazardous condition reporting procedures.

(c)  Fire hazards and fire plan.

(d)  Protective equipment policy.

(e)  Local safety plan.

(9)  Include safety and health program elements, employee rights and responsibilities under the program, applicable information on the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) of 1970, Executive Order 12196, 29 CFR 1960, the DOI and USGS Safety manuals, and other related regulations, per 485 DM Chapter 13.3, as part of new employee orientation.  This can be accomplished by employees taking the USGS Employee Orientation hosted within DOI Learning Management System.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Maintain a resource library of local safety and health training sources and assist local supervisors and training officers in identifying, coordinating, scheduling, conducting, and documenting employee training.

(2)  Assist management in meeting this training requirement by identifying previous fiscal year training accomplished and forecast upcoming fiscal year training needs/requirements as part of the USGS Annual Action Plan and Accomplishment Program Planning process, as described in Chapter 3 of this Handbook.

E. Employees.

(1)  Attend safety training programs and provide feedback to supervisors on quality and content of the program.

(2)  Assist supervisors in determining safety training requirements.

Appendix 14-A: Master Training Requirements

Appendix 14-2: Safety Training for Water-Related Activities

 

 

______/s/ Karen D. Baker_________                                           9/5/08_________
Karen D. Baker                                                                             Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 15

Job Hazard Analyses

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to address organizational changes and to reflect current guidance and responsibilities regarding Job Hazard Analyses (JHAs).

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for structuring and using job hazard analyses within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

 

2.  References.

A.  485 Departmental Manual, Safety and Occupational Health Program, Chapter 14 Job Hazard Analyses.

B.  Survey Manual (SM) 445-3-H Safety and Health for Field Operations Handbook, Topic 1, Job Hazard Analysis.

C.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.132(d), General Requirements.

D.  29 CFR Subpart I Appendix B Non-mandatory Compliance Guidelines for Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  Measures shall be in place to assess the workplace in order to determine if hazards are present, or are likely to be present, which necessitate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and/or higher level controls, (e.g., engineering or administrative).

B.  A system shall be developed and managed by which major activities and individual jobs are analyzed regarding the following:

(1)  The sequence of work.

(2)  The hazards associated with the sequence (actions).

(3)  The methods or safeguards to prevent, reduce, and/or control the identified hazard(s).

C.  The following activities or circumstances are examples of where JHA techniques shall be used:

(1)  Hazardous activities such as confined space entry.

(2)  Bridge and boat measurements.

(3)  Stream gage measurements over, in, around water or ice-covered locations, electrofishing, rocket netting, blasting, or using explosives.

(4)  Travel over severe terrain or specialized motor vehicle use.

(5)  Aircraft special use.

(6)  Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus operations.

(7)  Use of highly toxic, corrosive, reactive, or flammable materials.

(8)  High voltage (>240 volts).

(9)   Lockout/tagout.

(10)  High pressure or vacuum equipment.

D.  Should an injury or illness occur during a task for which a JHA has already been prepared, then note the step on the JHA where the accident occurred and detail what changes shall be made to prevent the recurrence of a similar accident.  Should an injury or illness occur during a task for which a JHA had not been prepared, the investigating Regional or Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch (OSHMB) Safety Manager and/or Accident Review Board shall determine the need for completion of a JHA for the operation by local management.  After reporting the accident through the Safety Management Information System, the JHA shall be forwarded to the appropriate Regional or OSHMB Safety Manager.

E.  To conduct a JHA, carefully study and record each step of a job and identify any existing or potential job hazards.  Consult 29 CFR Subpart I Appendix B for hazard assessment guidance.  For each identified hazard, determine what controls shall be used to eliminate the hazard, or reduce the hazard to an acceptable level.  Preference shall be given to engineering controls first, administrative controls second, then to PPE last.  Each JHA shall address the following elements:

(1)  A breakdown of the job activity into steps.  Describe what is done and not how it is done.

(2)  Examine each job step to determine the hazards present.

(a)  At a minimum, consider hazards due to impact, penetration, compression (e.g., rollover), chemicals, heat or cold, harmful dusts, radiation (e.g., radioactive materials, ultraviolet light, radiofrequency radiation), electricity, and ergonomic stressors.

(b)  At a minimum, assess how the hazards may harm the head, eyes, face, hearing, lungs, hands, body, and feet.

(3)  Evaluate each hazard to determine the cause and any factor that may contribute to creation of hazard.

(4)  For each hazard identify corrective or preventive measures.  Eliminate the source or cause of the hazard if possible.  If the hazard cannot be eliminated identify engineering controls, improved procedures, personal protective equipment, and training requirements that shall help to control the hazard.  Identified hazard controls shall be in place before work proceeds.

F.  Each JHA may contain the following:

(1)  A section describing unsafe conditions under which no operations shall be conducted.

(2)  Conditions, if any, for which the wearing of a PPE is not required.

(3)  Conditions, if any, when more than one employee is required to perform the operation.

(4)  Emergency and rescue procedures, as applicable.  An example of a few general rescue techniques is provided in Topic 21, Ice-Covered Rivers in SM 445-3-H Safety and Health for Field Operations Handbook.  Additional generic JHAs by occupational job series that may be used as a starting point to modify for individual job functions.

(5)  The location and telephone number of emergency medical and rescue facilities.

G.  Each JHA shall be verified through a written certification that identifies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the date(s) of the hazard assessment; and which identifies the document as a certification of hazard assessment.

H.  Examples of tools that may be used in developing job hazard analyses are listed below.

(1)  The Personal Hazard Analysis system provides an automated tool to assist the supervisor and employee to identify hazards, control measures, written programs and procedures; and determine training requirements. 

(2)  JHA inclusion within Budget and Science Information System Plus allows project managers to budget for safety requirements such as training, safety equipment, exposure sampling, medical monitoring, and personal protective equipment Site Information Management System serves as a framework for information used by audiences ranging from hydrologists, hydrographers, managers and the bureau safety community.  Site Hazard Analyses are included in the information supplied for each site. 

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Maintains a library of JHAs within the USGS and publishes it electronically for use by the regions and mission areas.

(2)  Provides program oversight and periodically evaluates JHA effectiveness.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance to mission areas, offices, regional managers, supervisors and employees in implementing JHA requirements.

B.  Regional or Occupational Safety and Health Branch Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide technical assistance to Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) and Managers/Supervisors in review, conduct, and concurrence with locally developed JHAs.

(2)  Forward JHAs for hazardous activities to the Occupational Safety and Health Manager for electronic publishing.

(3)  Review JHAs during safety and health assessments to assess effectiveness and compliance. 

(4)  Track and ensure abatement of findings in the Inspection and Abatement System.

C.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Identify all hazardous operations or activities under their control, develop and approve corresponding written JHAs.  Ensure each JHA is verified through a written certification that identifies the workplace evaluated; the person certifying that the evaluation has been performed; the date(s) of the hazard assessment; and, which identifies the document as a certification of hazard assessment.

(2)  Coordinate supervisor or manager review of all developed JHAs.

(3)  Discuss the results of each JHA with affected personnel focusing on identified hazards and steps to be taken to reduce hazards prior to beginning the hazardous job activity.

(4)  Provide or make accessible to all personnel engaged in hazardous activities written JHAs applicable to their occupation or activities.

(5)  Maintain a file for all JHAs and provide a copy to the CDSPC.

(6)  Review JHAs periodically and update whenever changes occur to the job.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers and supervisors in the development of the JHAs.

(2)  Maintain a local file of JHAs for all activities and provide copies to the respective Regional Safety Manager or OSHMB Safety Manager.

E.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with work regulations and procedures in the JHA, including the use of PPE.

(2)  Report to their supervisors or CDSPC conditions that may warrant a JHA revision, e.g., new unsafe and/or unhealthful working conditions for a given job task or activity.

F.  Contracting Officer’s Representative.

(1)  When work is performed by contractors, the Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) shall determine that the person in charge of the work has developed appropriate JHAs for the work to be performed.  This information shall be provided to and accepted by the Contracting Officer (CO) or COR prior to permitting the contractor to proceed with the work.

(2)  Coordinate contractor safety and health briefings with the CO when new procedures or changes are put in place involving compliance with safety and health requirements.

(3)  Keep the CO apprised of safety or health related issues that have a direct impact on the oversight and/or performance of contracted work.

(4)  Report violations cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to the CO and Regional or OSHMB Safety Manager to facilitate corrective actions.

 

Katie McCulloch for /s/ Jose R. Aragon                                    5/03/2017
_________________________________                                                                              
Jose R. Aragon                                                                        Date
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 16

Motor Vehicle Safety

Instruction: This chapter is revised to clarify required training and personal protective equipment.  In addition, the chapter reflects organizational changes.

 

1.  Purpose. 

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (OSH Program) requirements for the safe operation of motor vehicles by employees and volunteers of the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the performance of official Government duties.

2.  Scope.

A.  This chapter applies to:

(1)  Any employee or volunteer who operates a motor vehicle in the performance of official duties.

(2)  Motor vehicles including: all vehicles owned or leased by the USGS; privately owned vehicles; and other vehicles such as trucks, drilling rigs, forklifts, all-terrain vehicles, and snowmobiles.

 

3.  Authorities/References.

A.  41 CFR 102.34, Motor Vehicle Management.

B.  40 U.S. Code Section, Section 606, Regulations Related to Operation (Motor Vehicle).

C.  49 CFR Part 383, Commercial Driver’s License Standards; Requirements and Penalties.

D.  Executive Order, October 1, 2009, Federal Leadership on Reducing Text Messaging
While Driving.

E.  Section 211(j) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 as amended [68 Stat. 1128].

F.  U.S. Office of Personnel Management Operating Manual for Qualification Standards for General Schedule Positions, General Policies and Instructions, Section E.9.(f) Motor Vehicle Standards.

G.  SM 409.1, Personal Property - Vehicle Management.

H.  National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

I.  Motor Vehicle Safety (OSHA).

J.  Traffic Safety Digest (NHTSA).

K.  Department of Transportation, Motor Carrier requirements.

 

4.  Requirements.  

A.  General.

(1)  Electronic equipment(mobile phone, tablet, or Global Positioning System (GPS), text messaging) use in vehicles (owned, leased, or rented) must be restricted as follows:

(a)  The driver of a Government vehicle or a privately owned vehicle, while on official Government business, must ensure compliance with all State and local laws governing the use of cellular telephones and similar devices while operating a motor vehicle. Hands-free cellular devices may be used when permitted by law. Use of cellular telephones and/or similar devices not equipped for hands-free operation is prohibited while operating a DOI provided vehicle .

(b)  Text messaging (reading, typing, or sending) is prohibited when driving Government vehicles or privately owned vehicles while on official Government business. 

(2)  While operating/riding a motorcycle on official Government business, Department of Transportation approved helmets must be worn. 

(3)  All accidents involving a motor vehicle must be reported as required in SM 445-2-H.7.

(4)  All work-related vehicle accidents must be investigated and analyzed.  Appropriate action must be taken to minimize future incidents.

(5)  Appropriate safety features must be included in purchase orders and lease agreements for non-General Services Administration vehicles.

(6)  Motor vehicles should be inspected prior to use (visual) and must be inspected annually in order to maintain them in safe and operable conditions.  At a minimum, annual safety inspections must consist of the items in Appendix E, Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Checklist.  Deficiencies that impair safety of operations must be corrected before returning the vehicle to an operational status.  Organizations can satisfy the inspection requirement through participation in an established annual state inspection program.  Documentation must be maintained at the local level.

(7)  All field vehicles used to transport cargo must be equipped to secure equipment and materials from moving during transport.  Securing options may include equipping a vehicle with a properly designed safety screen installed between the passenger compartment and cargo area or using a cargo net or tie down straps/chains to prevent objects from moving.  A securely mounted and easily accessible fire extinguisher is required to be on-board.

(8)  For large vehicles and vehicles that pull trailers, personnel shall complete hands-on vehicle maneuverability training prior to operation to ensure they have the skills needed to operate the vehicle safely.

(9)  When performing towing operations, the weight must not exceed the manufacture’s maximum listed towing capacity.

(10)  Employees and volunteers who operate a Government or privately owned motor vehicle while on official Government business must:

(a)  Possess valid state/international licenses for the class of vehicle being operated, certifying license validity in writing annually, and maintain their Federal Motor Carrier Medical Permit, as applicable.  Employees and volunteers must notify their supervisors if their drivers’ licenses are suspended, restricted, revoked, canceled, or if they have been otherwise disqualified from holding licenses; i.e., unable to pass medical screening.  Appendix A, Annual Motor Vehicle Operator’s Certification Form, may be used for this purpose.  Employees shall also inform their supervisor of any tickets or driving violation that occur while driving official business (example, speeding ticket, use of mobile phone while driving, etc.).

(b)  Have supervisor’s approval to operate the vehicle.  The supervisor must ensure that the employee or volunteer has the ability to safely operate the vehicle in the operational environment assigned.

(c)  Be at least 18 years old to operate a motor vehicle.

(d)  Not exceed 10 hours of driving time (behind the wheel) during a 16-hour duty period.  This 10-hour period includes rest and meal breaks.  Management may place further limitations on the above hours of duty and/or driving time due to safety factors; e.g., fatigue, weather, distance, and illness.

(e)  Ensure that all vehicle occupants wear seat belts while the vehicle is in motion, on or off the highway, for general and commercial vehicles.

(f)  Not operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or drugs (including prescription medications that may affect the ability to drive safely) nor while sick or suffering from excessive fatigue or emotional stress. 

(g)  Observe all Federal, state, and local traffic regulations.

(h)  Be licensed in accordance with regulations administered by the Federal Highway Administration and the state when transporting minors.

(i)  Complete initial and refresher training no less than once every 3 years.  This training should include the following: information regarding potential penalties (see 49 CFR 383 and 391) for failure to operate motor vehicles in a safe and lawful manner, and concepts of defensive driving; physical and mental conditions that affect driving; effects of drugs and alcohol on the driver, including defense against the impaired driver; adjusting to a variety of driving conditions and environments; techniques for backing safely; and the safety risks associated with the use of electronic equipment (e.g., text messaging) while driving.  The National Safety Council and American Automobile Association Defensive Driver course content meets the intent of this training.  Alternative training must be coordinated through the respective Regional Safety Manager or Office of Management Services Safety Staff and approved by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager prior to instruction.

For anyone driving a government or privately owned vehicle (GOV/POV) regularly as a primary duty on an on-going daily basis, e.g., shuttle bus, field vehicle, or personally owned sedan/truck for field activities, initial and refresher training applies.

Exception.  Initial and refresher training is not required for general purpose rental car use while on official travel.  Driving rental cars is not a primary job duty.  Furthermore, employees using rental cars when on travel comply with the same requirement of the state; e.g., meet state requirements for a valid license inclusive of training on rules of the road, vision checks, etc.  Local management has the discretion to be more stringent and require defensive driver training for general purpose rental car operators.

(j)  Have their driving records validated by the state (international-licensed drivers exempted) and/or National Driver Register upon employment and whenever management deems it advisable to review.  This responsibility is delegated to local organizational managers and supervisors and may be re-delegated as deemed appropriate.

B.  Commercial Motor Vehicles and Specialized Vehicles.

(1)  In addition to the requirements in 16.4.A. above, employees or volunteers who operate commercial motor vehicles (having a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,000 pounds or towing a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pound or more), hauling hazardous material requiring the vehicle to be placarded, or operating a vehicle designed to transport 16 or more people, including the driver, must:

(a)  Possess only one state commercial driver’s license.

(b)  Pass Federal Motor Carrier Medical Screening.

(c)  Possess a valid medical examiner’s certificate, required by Federal Motor Carrier License requirements.

(d)  Be at least 21 years old.

(e)  Notify supervisor if driver’s license is suspended, revoked, restricted, canceled, or if employee has been disqualified from holding a state or international license.

(f)  Be licensed in accordance with regulations administered by the Federal Highway Administration and the state when transporting children.

(2)  Initial and refresher specialized vehicle training must include a review of the operator manual and successful completion of supervised “hands-on” exercises.  

(3)  Employees and volunteers who operate vehicles that require specialized skills or knowledge (e.g., forklifts, drill rigs, snowmobiles, skid steers, and other vehicles with greater than 1-ton capacity, or vehicles towing watercraft, snowmobiles, or other large equipment) must obtain supervisory authorization and have the appropriate training prior to vehicle operation.  In lieu of training, supervisors may authorize operation of specialized vehicles if the employee or volunteer is licensed to operate.

C.  Off-Highway Vehicles.

(1)  Off-Highway Vehicles are vehicles that are not designed to travel streets or highways.  
Employees and volunteers must meet the following minimum requirements in order to operate an off-highway vehicle:

(a)  Complete a Formal Risk Assessment.  Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that a formal risk assessment has been prepared and approved for operation of an off-highway vehicle.  (See Appendix B, Levels of Risk and Use of the Risk Decision Authority Matrix.)

(b)  Training.  Each off-highway vehicle operator must complete an operator training course developed by a manufacturer or other appropriate source, and taught by an individual who has successfully completed an off-highway vehicle instructor course in order to qualify for off-highway vehicle authorization.  Courses must be specific to each vehicle class, to include field instruction, and be documented.  Refresher training, operator evaluation - check ride, is required every 3 years, at a minimum.  Refresher training is strongly encouraged for infrequent operators (less than 24 annual ride hours) and when new equipment is placed in service. Training is available from employees who have completed an off-highway vehicle instructor course or through private vendors.

(c)  Fieldwork Procedures.  All off-highway vehicle operators must follow fieldwork procedures.  (Reference Safety and Health for Field Operations, Handbook SM 445-3-H.)  At a minimum, off-highway vehicle operators must:

(i)  Use a “buddy system” for all fieldwork, when required by a Field Risk Assessment.

(ii)  Use a check-out/check-in system.

(iii)  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).

(2)  Personal Protective Equipment.

(a)  All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) and Utility Terrain Vehicles (UTVs).  Operators and passengers must wear the following personal protective equipment:

(i)  A helmet meeting the standards of the Department of Transportation, the Snell Memorial Foundation, Inc., or the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).  Helmets must be fastened.  Exception:  When a shoulder and lap belt is used in an UTV, on rural landscape or maintenance service, the use of a helmet is not required.

(ii)  A face shield, impact-resistant goggles, or impact resistant glasses or sunglasses meeting the standard, ANSI Z87.1 American National Standard for Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices.

(iii)  Full-fingered gloves.

(iv)  Long-sleeved shirt and long trousers.

(v)  Over-the-ankle protective boots.

(vi)  Clothing prudent for the conditions and terrain.  This may include additional gear depending on the weather conditions, hazards, and environmental issues.

(b)  Off Road Motorcycle.  In addition to the personal protective equipment required in section 16.4.C.(2)(a) of this chapter, kneepads, shin pads, and elbow pads are required.

(c)  Snowmobile.  In addition to the personal protective equipment required in section 16.4.C.(2)(a), a facemask, appropriate gloves, snowsuit, and snowmobile boots are required.

(d)  In addition to the supervisor, a safety professional must also approve the purchase of personal protective equipment.  (Reference Personal Protective Equipment, SM 445-2-H.26.)

(3)  Employees and volunteers must not operate 3-wheeled off-highway vehicles.

(4)  Off-highway vehicles must be purchased and maintained with an approved flame arresting exhaust system.

(5)  Off-highway vehicles must be purchased with a roll over protection structure (ROPS) and seat belts.  When these options are available they must be incorporated into the vehicle and all vehicle occupants must wear seat belts while the vehicle is in motion. 

(6)  Items carried on off-highway vehicles (e.g., scientific equipment, gear, spray tanks, and firearms) must be attached or affixed to the off-highway vehicle in a manner which precludes the items from becoming entangled during operation.  All guns must be in the unloaded condition when transported on an off-highway vehicle.  If the off-highway vehicle has a roll over protection structure, any attachment device must not compromise the structural integrity (e.g., do not drill into the roll over protection structure).    

(7)  The off-highway vehicle manufacturer’s maximum weight rating for utility and cargo racks must not be exceeded.

(8)  Off-highway vehicles must be properly secured for transport using a minimum of two (2) tie-down straps with a working load limit of at least 50 percent of the weight of the off-highway vehicle.

(9)  Fire extinguishers and first aid kits must be readily available when using off-highway vehicles.

(10)  Field Risk Assessment.

(a)  A field risk assessment must be documented in the event of any significant change in weather, terrain, or circumstance.  Significant changes include:

(i)  Weather.  Rain, snow, hail, ice storm, and electrical storm.

(ii)  Terrain.  Mudslide, rockslide, washout, high water, avalanche, and unfamiliar terrain.

(iii)  Circumstance.  New or unfamiliar equipment, buddy unavailable.

(b)  Preventive maintenance checks and services checklist for off-highway vehicles and snowmobiles must be signed by the supervisor and the employee or volunteer before commencing operation of any off-highway vehicle.  These checklists may be found in Appendix C, Off-Road Vehicles Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services and in Appendix D, Snowmobile Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services, respectively.

(c)  If a buddy is unavailable, the supervisor may authorize a solo off-highway vehicle operation after preparing a specific ride plan.  The plan supplements the field risk assessment with an analysis of the specific environmental situation including:

(i)  Weather.

(ii)  Terrain.

(iii)  Communication capabilities.

(d)  At a minimum, the ride plan must address:

(i)  More frequent communications.

(ii)  A detailed itinerary.

(iii) A specific route map.

(e)  A Risk Management Worksheet can be used to document the analysis.  The decision document must be signed by the supervisor and kept on file.  Employees and volunteers have the responsibility to follow safe operating procedures and have the right to decline to operate any equipment under circumstances they deem to be unsafe.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Directs establishment of a bureau motor vehicle safety program through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with motor vehicle safety policy requirements.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to develop, direct, and manage an effective motor vehicle safety program.

(2)  Assigns motor vehicle safety policy authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

 

  • Assigns motor vehicle safety policy and program oversight responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.
  • Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities motor vehicle safety program needs.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Establishes and oversees motor vehicle safety policy management.

(2)  Approves all exceptions to established motor vehicle safety policy, training, and instruction.

(3)  Ensures OMS Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch staff has sufficient authority and resources to effectively support regional and mission areas in the implementation of the motor vehicle safety policy.

(4)  Ensures the assessment of regional and local implementation of the motor vehicle safety policy every 3 years, in accordance with SM 445-2-H.5 Program Evaluations.

(5)  Coordinate with respective regional and national programs safety managers to ensure local implementation of the motor vehicle safety policy.

(6)  Provide opportunity and resources for professional development of staff to ensure continual development of knowledge and skills and to remain current and up-to-date with the advances in the field of occupational safety and health.

(7)  Evaluate regional and mission areas to assess the effectiveness and degree of the motor vehicle safety policy administration and implementation, every 3 years at a minimum.  Evaluations must consider employee and volunteer training, vehicle inspections and maintenance, and licensing requirements.  

H.  Regional and National Programs Safety Managers.

(1)  Conduct periodic evaluations of regional and mission areas to determine the effectiveness of motor vehicle safety.  Evaluations must consider the overall motor vehicle safety compliance (e.g., employee and volunteer training, vehicle maintenance, inspections, and licensing requirements).

(2)  Provide assistance to regions, mission areas and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) to implement the motor vehicle safety program.  Oversee and coordinate assistance to CDSPCs in determining training needs for program implementation.

(3)  Evaluate motor vehicle training to determine adequacy, cost effectiveness, and appropriateness in meeting program needs.

(4)  Review requests for exceptions to established policy, training, and instruction and coordinate approval with the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

I.  Cost Center Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Establish and implement a local level motor vehicle safety program for employees and volunteers who operate motor and specialized vehicles.

(2)  Ensure employees and volunteers who operate a motor vehicle have valid state drivers’ licenses for the class vehicle to be operated.

(3)  Annually, maintain and update Motor Vehicle Operator’s Certification Forms and current medical screening and documents/records in accordance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPPA) Privacy Act requirements for all employees and volunteers.

(4)  Coordinate initial and refresher defensive driving training no less than once every 3 years for employees and volunteers who operate a motor vehicle in the performance of official duties to meet section 16.4.A.(10)(i) of this chapter.  Supervisors may require additional or more frequent training if warranted by an employee’s or volunteer’s driving record.

(5)  Coordinate specialized motor vehicle training for each specific type of vehicle operated, such as an operator course developed by the vehicle manufacturer or another appropriate source, to facilitate an employee’s or volunteer’s participation and knowledge of operating and manufacturer recommendations for maximum speed and safety procedures.

(6)  Coordinate off-highway vehicle training to ensure that an employee or volunteer successfully completes an operator training course developed by a manufacturer or other appropriate source, and is taught by an individual who has successfully completed an off-highway vehicle instructor course in order to qualify for off-highway vehicle authorization.

(7)  Establish an inspection and maintenance program for all vehicles on a recurring basis with documentation maintained for the life of the vehicle.  Vehicles with defects or deficiencies affecting occupant safety must be taken out of service until repaired.  Appendix E and Appendix F, New Vehicle Safety Organization Plan, may be used for this purpose.

(8)  Monitor identified motor vehicle deficiencies and corrective actions until abated.

J.  Contracting Officer Representatives.

(1)  Ensure contractor compliance with applicable requirements in this chapter when the Bureau arranges (via procurement contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, etc.) to have work performed by a contractor or subcontractor that involves motor vehicle operation, including the ban on text messaging while operating a vehicle in the performance of any work for or on behalf of the Government.

K. Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Establish programs to strengthen employee, volunteer, and supervisor awareness of motor vehicle policy requirements as detailed within this chapter.

(2)  Establish inspection programs for all organizational vehicles at least annually or more often as recommended by the manufacturer.

  • Assist supervisors in the administration of the motor vehicle program, inclusive of appropriate training.

(4)  Coordinate training requests that deviate from established course requirements with the appropriate full-time safety staff, as applicable, for approval by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

L.  Employees and Volunteers.

(1)  Notify supervisors, using the Annual Motor Vehicle Operator’s Certification, Appendix A, if their drivers’ licenses have been suspended, revoked, restricted, or canceled, or if they have been convicted of any moving traffic violation that affects their driving status, or when an operator receives a ticket or other violation while operating a vehicle on official business.

(2)  Avoid situations resulting in backing maneuvers.  When backing maneuvers are necessary, conduct a walk around of the vehicle to identify obstacles that may be hidden from view when seated behind the steering wheel.  When passengers or other employees or volunteers are present, employ them as spotters when backing the vehicle.

(3)  When weather conditions warrant, ensure the use of windshield wipers and headlights.  When windshield wipers are on, lights must be on.

(4)  Perform and document routine checks of vehicle safety components(e.g., tires, windshield wipers, headlights, taillights, turn signals, mirrors).  Immediately report all vehicle defects to the responsible supervisor.

(5)  Secure all weights, compressed gas cylinders, and other heavy or large items in the vehicle. Transport gasoline and other hazardous materials in approved containers and secure to prevent movement.

(6)  Prior to operating a vehicle, complete training for the appropriate vehicle type that meets requirement 16.4. 

(7)  If operating a vehicle under a commercial license, maintain official Motor Carrier Log Book of hours, rest, and out-of-service times as required by the Department of Transportation.

Appendix 16-A: Annual Motor Vehicle Operator’s Certification

 

Appendix 16-B: Risk Management Worksheet

Appendix 16-C: Off-Road Vehicles Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services

Appendix 16-D: Snowmobile Preventative Maintenance

 

Appendix 16-E: Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Checklist

Appendix 16-F: New Vehicle Safety Checklist

 

 

/s/ Jose Aragon                                                                              July 18, 2015
_________________________________________________     _______________ 
Jose Aragon, Associate Director for Administration

 

 

 

CHAPTER 17

Work Zone Safety

Instruction: This chapter is revised to update organizational changes, resources and references and to add an example traffic control plan.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for employees or contractors working along roadways and/or on bridges.  The chapter provides instructions on the development of site-specific Traffic Control Plans (TCPs) for field operations conducted from bridges and along roadways.  Working from bridges and roadways can disturb vehicle and pedestrian traffic flow and poses a serious safety hazard to employees, contractors, and the public.

 

2.  Scope. This chapter applies to:

A.  All cost centers that conduct official business along roadways and/or on bridges.

B.  Any employee, contractor, or volunteer working along roadways and/or on bridges.

 

3.  References.

A.  United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA).

B.  National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

C.  The National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse.

D.  Motor Vehicle Safety (Occupational Safety and Health Administration).

E.  Traffic Safety Digest.

F. NHTSA Regional Offices.

G.  Site Information Management System.

H.  ANSI/ISEA 107 American National Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Accessories, current version.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Traffic Control Plan.

(1)  Each cost center must develop site-specific TCPs, sometimes described as a Temporary Traffic Control Plans, for each bridge or roadway work site where work is performed on or within 15 feet from the edge of any roadway.  The degree of detail in the plan depends on the type of highway, road conditions, duration of operation, physical constraints, and the nearness of the work space activity to road users.  A site-specific TCP must include:

(a)  Field instructions for traffic control including the mandatory use of Class 3 high visibility apparel and the use and location of motor vehicle warning lights (e.g., high-intensity rotating, flashing, oscillating, or strobe lights).

(b)  Instructions for flaggers.

(c) A list of minimum vehicle traffic control equipment.

(d)  Traffic control schemes that define the most common road situations.

(e)  Traffic control zones.  These are usually divided into four areas: the advance warning area,

the transition area, the activity area, and the termination area.

(f)  Each site-specific TCP must provide a description of the type of roadway, traffic conditions, physical constraints, and meet the more stringent of any applicable Federal, State, or local requirement. Refer to Part 6 of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) for federal plan requirement details.

(2)  The cost center must submit each site-specific TCP for review and approval to the agency that has jurisdiction over the road where the work will take place. Examples are:

(a)  For work on a state highway, submit the plan to the State Department of Transportation.

(b)  For work on a city street, submit the plan to the Public Works Department of the city.

(c)  For work on roads under Federal jurisdiction (e.g., National Parks), submit the plan to the Federal Highway Administration.

(3)  Each site-specific TCP must be reviewed and updated at least annually.

(4)  All records relating to each site-specific TCP must be maintained for review by safety personnel during periodic inspections.

(5)  A copy of each site-specific TCP must be readily available to employees.

(6)  Site-specific TCPs may be developed using the Site Information Management System (SIMS) TCP calculator.

(7)  Although not required, cost centers may choose to supplement the site-specific TCP with an overarching Center TCP that describes the general requirements.

B.  High Visibility Apparel.  All employees and contractors who work on or within 15 feet from the edge of any roadway must wear Class 3 high visibility apparel that complies with the current version of ANSI/ISEA 107 standard.  Class 3 high visibility apparel ensures the greatest level of visibility.

C.  Training.  Employees and contractors that work from bridges or along roadways must receive the following traffic control safety training:

(1)  High-Visibility Safety Apparel in Work Zones.

(a)  All employees and contractors who work on or within 15 feet from the edge of any roadway must complete training to ensure identification and understanding of work zone traffic hazards and requirements and the need for increasing visibility while working from bridges or along roadways.

(b)  Training is required upon initial assignment and recommended every four years thereafter.

(c)  Online general awareness training is available at http://www.workzonesafety.org/training_courses/atssa_high-visibility_safety_apparel_training_module/player.html.

(2)  Flaggers.  Flagger training is required for employees and contractors with flagger responsibilities.  The training is required upon initial assignment.  Flagger retraining is required at least every four years.  Retraining frequency must comply with the more stringent of Federal or State requirements.  Flaggers must be able to satisfactorily demonstrate the following abilities:

(a)  Ability to receive and communicate specific instructions clearly, firmly, and courteously;

(b)  Ability to move and maneuver quickly in order to avoid danger from errant vehicles;

(c)  Ability to control signaling devices (such as paddles and flags) in order to provide clear and positive guidance to drivers approaching a traffic control zone in frequently changing situations;

(d)  Ability to understand and apply safe traffic control practices, sometimes in stressful or emergency situations; and

(e)  Ability to recognize dangerous traffic situations and warn workers in sufficient time to avoid injury.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director. Directs the Work Zone Safety activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that respective region, mission area, or office implements and complies with Work Zone Safety requirements.

(2)  Provide staff and funding support to ensure that program requirements are implemented and findings are abated.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official/Associate Director for Administration.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to develop, direct, and manage an effective Work Zone Safety policy.

(2)  Assigns Work Zone Safety policy authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services. Assigns Work Zone Safety responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the Work Zone Safety program.

(2)  Ensures the development of the Work Zone Safety policy.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance in implementing Work Zone Safety requirements to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of the Work Zone Safety program.

(2)  Validate through inspections and external audits that required elements of the Work Zone Safety are implemented in accordance with policy and regulations.  Track and ensure abatement of findings in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(3)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in implementing and complying with Work Zone Safety requirements.

G.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to implement elements of Work Zone Safety, when required.

(2)  Inspect traffic control work zones for related hazards.

(3)  Prepare each site-specific TCP for bridge and/or roadway operations with protection of the public and employees in mind.

(4)  Submit completed site-specific TCPs for review and approval to the agency that has jurisdiction over the road where the work will take place.

(5)  Implement site-specific TCPs upon approval by the agency that has jurisdiction.

(6)  Update site-specific TCPs to reflect changes as necessary.  Review and update plans at least annually.

(7)  Maintain all records relating to the site-specific TCPs.

(8)  Train employees who have traffic control work zone responsibilities.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Assist managers and supervisors in the implementation of the Work Zone Safety program.

I.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with Work Zone Safety requirements and report to their supervisors or Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators any concerns regarding work zone safety and health.

(2)  Comply with site-specific TCP requirements and complete High-Visibility Safety Apparel in Work Zone and Flagger training as applicable.

J.  Contracting Officers Representatives.  Ensure contractor compliance with applicable requirements when the USGS arranges via procurement contracts, grants, cooperative agreements, etc. to have work performed by a contractor that involves working on bridges and along roadways.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                December 2, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official 

 

 

CHAPTER 18

Date: 10/2001

Respiratory Protection Program

 

18.1 Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for providing personnel adequate protection from chemical, physical and/or biological stressors, such as noise, chemical exposures, excessive temperatures, dusts, mists, and vapors within the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS).

 

18.2 References.

A.  Executive Order 12196.

B.  29 CFR 1960, Subpart C, Standards.

C.  29 CFR 1910, General Industry Standards.

D.  Department of the Interior Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

E.  29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

F.  29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix A, Fit Testing Procedures (Mandatory).

G.  29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix B1, User Check Seal Procedures (Mandatory).

H.  29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix B2, Respirator Cleaning Procedures (Mandatory).

I.  29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix C, OSHA Respirator Medical Evaluation Questionnaire (Mandatory).

J.  29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix D, Information of Personnel Using Respirators When Not Required Under Standard (Mandatory).

K.  Title 42 CFR, Part 84, Respiratory Protection Devices.

 

18.3 Scope.  This program outlines minimum requirements for acceptable Respiratory Protection Programs (RPPs) within USGS.  These requirements apply to all USGS personnel whose job duties involve the use of respiratory protection devices and who work in an environment with potential exposure to respiratory hazards.

(1)  No part of this chapter is intended to supersede those requirements established by 29 CFR 1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

(2)  OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs), found in 29 CFR 1910.1000, or ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs), shall be the primary baseline for determining hazardous airborne concentrations of toxic materials.  Where conflict exists between OSHA PELs, and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) TLVs, the more stringent requirement should apply.

 

18.4  Requirements.

A.  The Office of Managing Risk and Public Safety (MRPS) and the USGS will have the services of an industrial hygienist(s) readily available.

B.  The USGS Office of Administrative and Policy Services, Office of Management Services, Branch of Safety and Environmental Management employs a full-time Industrial Hygienist who coordinates the occupational health program and is available for consultation with regional and field organizational staff, as needed.

C.  The USGS shall evaluate potential health hazards in the workplace and control them using appropriate means.  Engineering controls shall be used as the primary means to prevent exposure to hazards.  Administrative controls and personal protective equipment will supplement engineering controls as appropriate.

D.  The USGS shall provide a respiratory protection program for personnel who are exposed to potentially harmful gases, vapors and particulates.  The written program will comply with current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, as a minimum.  Medical evaluations of respirator users shall be conducted prior to issuing respiratory equipment and should be performed consistent with guidelines in the DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

E.  Engineering controls or changes in methods or process shall be used to the greatest extent possible to either eliminate or reduce respiratory hazards to acceptable levels.  Respiratory hazards include, but are not limited to, insufficient oxygen and/or contaminated air with harmful dusts, fumes, sprays, mists, fogs, smokes, vapors, or gases.

(1)  Depending on the substance, airborne contaminants can either cause irritation, disease, or other damage to the tissue of the respiratory system or contaminants can enter the lungs and pass directly into the bloodstream and be carried to other parts of the body.  The toxic action of a substance can be generally divided into acute and chronic effects.  Acute effects generally involve short-term high concentrations and immediate effects of some kind: illness, irritation, or death.  An example of an acute exposure would be inhaling high levels of carbon monoxide or ingesting a sufficient quantity of a cyanide compound to produce rapid poisoning.  A related categorization of acute atmospheric hazard relevant to respiratory protection is Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH). IDLH atmospheres are concentrations of any toxic, corrosive, or asphyxiant substances that pose an immediate threat to life, would cause irreversible or delayed adverse health effects, or would interfere with an individual's ability to escape from a dangerous atmosphere by causing severe eye or respiratory irritation and other deleterious effect (e.g., disorientation or lack of coordination).

(2)  Additionally, atmospheres with less than 19.5 percent oxygen or that contain 10 percent of the lower exposure limit are considered immediately dangerous to life or health.

(3)  Chronic effects generally develop slowly over months or years of continued or repetitive exposure to a toxic substance. For example PELs, RELs, and TLVs were established to protect against chronic health effects by establishing airborne concentrations of substances and conditions of exposure under which it is believed nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without adverse health effects.

(4)  Airborne contaminants are physically classified as either gas, vapor, or particulate (dust, fume, mist).  Gases are the normal state for many substances, (e.g., hydrogen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen).  Vapors are formed by the evaporation of substances such as acetone or methanol.  Dusts are solid particles produced by processes such as grinding, crushing, drilling, or shaking.  Fumes are formed when volatilized solids condense in cool air.  Welding is the most common example of a process producing fumes.  Gases and vapor are not fumes although the terms are often mistakenly used interchangeably.  Mists are finely divided liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere and formed by the condensation of liquids from the vapor state back to the liquid state, or by operations such as spraying.

(5)  Respiratory protection shall be considered as an alternative to engineering controls only in the following situations:

(a)  When engineering controls are not possible or practical (i.e., short term, nonroutine, or remote site operations).

(b)  When development or installation of engineering controls is pending.

(6)  A written respiratory protection program (RPP) shall be developed in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(C) whenever elastomeric respirators are worn to protect personnel health from contaminated or oxygen deficient air.  RPPs are implemented so that personnel can be provided with respiratory protection when the status of engineering controls to control respiratory hazards is unknown, while engineering controls are being instituted, or when engineering controls are not feasible.  Unlike engineering controls, respirators do not eliminate a hazard.  If the respiratory equipment is not used or is used improperly (equipment does not fit or is damaged), exposure to the hazard would likely occur. In addition to the items listed in 29 CFR 1910.134(C)(1), the RPP must contain site or task-specific procedures and elements for respirator use and be updated as necessary to reflect any changes regarding respirator use.  RRPs are also required if personnel wear elastomeric respirators on a voluntary basis (i.e., when not required by OSHA or other governing regulation) to obtain relief from bothersome odors or to gain an additional level protection even though air contaminants are within acceptable limits.

(7)  Written RPPs are not required for voluntary use of disposable type dust masks provided a hazard assessment is performed to determine these type respirators are acceptable for the task and do not create a hazard in themselves.  To assist in this development, a generic respiratory protection program electronic version is available on the Department Web site at http://medical.smis.doi.gov/prog.htm.

(8)  Selection of respirators shall be based on evaluation of the respiratory hazard(s) present and in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(d).  Appendix 18-1, Selection Guide for Respiratory Protection is suggested for use in meeting this requirement.

(9)  Air monitoring or quantitative exposure estimates shall be performed to assess levels of airborne contaminants in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs) found in 29 CFR 1910.1000, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limits (RELs), or American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH).

(10)  Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) shall be the primary baseline for determining hazardous airborne concentrations of toxic materials.  Where conflicts exist between the various exposure limits, the more stringent limit shall apply.  In addition, this policy will be followed if respirators are worn for protection from exposure to other respiratory hazards that are encountered occasionally but have not been determined to exceed established exposure limits.  These occasionally encountered respiratory hazards may include exposure to organic vapors from paints and solvents, vapors from concentrated hydrochloric acid used to prepare dilute solutions for water-quality equipment rinses, metal oxide fumes from welding and metal cutting procedures, and chemical vapors from bleach solutions used for disinfection.

(11)  Only approved respiratory protection devices and components shall be allowed. Permitted respiratory devices and components are only those certified as NIOSH approved.

(12)  Selection of the air-purifying elements is based on the nature of the respiratory hazard.  Air-purifying elements provide protection against specific substances or groups and classes of contaminants.  It is imperative that the contaminant(s) be identified in order to select the proper air-purifying element.

(13)  Filters provide protection against respiratory hazards that are particulate in nature by trapping the contaminant within the fibers of the filter media.  An increase in breathing resistance will occur as a result of particulate contaminants lodging on the filter.  Filters should be considered spent and replaced whenever there is any noticeable increase in breathing resistance or as otherwise recommended by the manufacturer.

(14)  Cartridges provide protection against certain gas and vapor respiratory hazards. Cartridges are available for protection against ammonia gas and mercury vapor, and classes of gases and vapors, such as acid gases and organic vapors.  In contrast to filters, which are effective to some degree no matter what the particulate, cartridges used for gas and vapor removal are designed for protection against specific contaminants only, and it is imperative that the contaminant(s) be identified in order to select the proper air-purifying element.  Cartridges should be considered spent and replaced when contaminants are first detected through the respirator or as otherwise recommended by the manufacturer.  Air-purifying respirators shall never be used for protection from chemicals that lack adequate warning properties.  Warning properties are considered adequate when a contaminants odor, taste, or irritant effects can be detected and are persistent at concentrations at or below the PEL or TLV.

(15)  Single use, disposable, or maintenance-free respirators should never be used in place of elastomeric face piece type respirators designed to accept replaceable cartridges.  Disposable-type respirators provide a much poorer face-piece seal than a properly fitted elastomeric face piece type respirator.  It is difficult to perform an effective negative and/or positive pressure preuse face piece leakage test with these types of respirators.

(16)  All filters and cartridges approved by NIOSH and MSHA are color coded according to the universal color-coding system established by American National Standard Institute.  Some of the color codes are listed below.

Color Protection
Purple High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA)
Black Organic Vapor (OV)
Yellow Organic Vapor/Acid Gas (OV/AG)
Brown Mercury
White Acid Gas
Green Ammonia/Methylamine

             

(17)  All of the air-purifying elements to be issued will be combinations of filters and cartridges.  The filter part of the combination is an HEPA filter, which mechanically traps particulate and provides protection from metal fumes, including zinc oxide and the particulate associated with hantavirus.  The cartridge part of the combination is an OV or OV/AG cartridge.  Both types of cartridges provide protection from organic vapors associated with paints, solvents, and pesticides.  The OV/AG cartridge also provides protection from acid gases, such as hydrogen chloride.  Make sure you know what protection your air-purifying elements will provide!

(18)  Regardless of frequency and duration of use, all filter/cartridge combinations are to be replaced at least annually.  Specific projects or jobs may require that air-purifying elements be replaced more frequently.  Refer to manufacturers’ recommendations regarding replacement of filters and cartridges and any expiration dates that may apply.  Filters and cartridges must be replaced if they get wet or damaged.  Both air-purifying elements must be replaced; never replace only one.

(19)  Respirator selection and use in atmospheres that are of either unknown hazard or known to be IDLH shall comply with 29 CFR 1910.134(d)(2) and (g)(3).

(20)  For each potentially hazardous job, a job hazard analysis (JHA) shall be developed to determine the need for, and as required, the specific type of respiratory protection to be utilized.  There are two general categories of respirators: (1) atmosphere-supplying (supplied air), and (2) air-purifying.  Atmosphere-supplying respirators provide an independent source of clean breathing air and must be used when entering an immediately dangerous to life or health atmosphere, an unknown atmosphere, or where an approved air-purifying respirator is unavailable for the specific contaminant at hand.  Use of atmosphere-supplying respirators requires coordination and approval of the Bureau Industrial Hygienist.

(21)  All personnel who use respirators shall be provided initial and follow-up medical evaluation in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(e) and 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix C. Initial medical evaluation must take place before personnel perform any respirator use activities to include fit testing.

(22)  A physician must evaluate personnel and provide medical clearance before respirators are issued or tasks assigned requiring respiratory protection.  All persons participating in the respiratory protection program must be evaluated and cleared for respirator use by a physician.  The physician shall determine what health and physical conditions are pertinent.  As required by the physician, periodic medical re-evaluation will be conducted.  Personnel who use elastomeric respirators on a voluntary basis are required to receive medical evaluation.  Medical evaluation is not required for the voluntary use of disposable-type dust masks when no airborne hazard is present.

(23)  Fit testing of tight fitting face piece respirators shall be provided as required by 29 CFR 1910.134(f).  Before an employee is required to use a tight fitting face piece respirator a fit test shall be successfully performed with the same make, model, and size respirator to be used.

(24)  All fit testing must be in accordance with the OSHA-approved protocols found in 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix A.  Respirators worn on a voluntary basis do not require fit testing. If the respirator will be worn with any additional equipment (e.g., corrective glasses, goggles, face shields, helmets, etc.) that could potentially compromise face piece seal, then respirator fit testing should be performed with this equipment in place to ensure that an adequate fit is obtained.

(25)  A qualitative fit-test (does not apply to hooded respirators operated with adequate positive pressure) will be performed and successfully passed before an employee can be issued a respirator or assigned to a task requiring the use of respiratory protection. In order to ensure continued proper fit and face piece seal, qualitative fit testing must be successfully completed on an annual basis unless a specific OSHA standard requires more frequent fit-testing (e.g., the asbestos, lead, arsenic, and acrylonitrile, standards require testing every six months).  Personnel performing fit-testing shall have received appropriate training.  Only validated qualitative fit-test protocols shall be used.  Several examples of acceptable protocols may be found in the current OSHA 29 CFR Subpart Z standards for toxic and hazardous substances (e.g., 1910.1001, Appendix C, and 1910.1025, Appendix D detail procedures for a variety of qualitative fit tests).

(26) Negative Pressure Fit Check.

(a)  Completely cover air-purifying elements.

(b)  Inhale and hold breath for 10 seconds.

(c)  Observe the face piece.  It should collapse slightly and you should not feel or hear any air leaks.  If you do, reposition the face piece and/or adjust the tension of the straps.  Test again, until there are no leaks.

(27) Positive Pressure Fit Check.

(a)  Completely cover the exhalation valves.

(b)  Exhale gently into the face piece.

(c)  Observe the face piece.  It should bulge slightly and you should not feel or hear any air leaks.  If you do, adjust the tension of the head harness straps until a tight seal is obtained.  Respirators must be visually inspected before and after each use to ensure that there are no damaged parts, that all components are in place, and that it is in good working condition.  After assembling the respirator by screwing in the air-purifying elements, check to ensure that the air-purifying elements are tightly sealed against the face piece, the exhalation valve is in place, and the sealing flange has not been distorted.  Report any damage or problems immediately to your supervisor or the Program Coordinator.  Do not use the respirator until the problem has been resolved (refer to manufacturer's instruction manual for respirator instructions).

(28)  Half Mask Respirators must be put on in a non-contaminated environment following these steps:

(a)  Remove eyewear, if worn.

(b)  Place exhalation valve under chin and narrow part of respirator on the nose bridge.

(c)  Pull the top straps up over the head, positioning them so the top strap rests across the top of the head and the bottom strap rests above the ears, on the back of the head.

(d)  Attach the bottom strap behind the neck and below the ears, and adjust the position of the face piece for fit and comfort.

(e)  Adjust the straps to ensure a tight seal. Always adjust from the top down.  Try to adjust the straps on either side so they are equal. Do not over tighten.  If the respirator is pinching or is uncomfortable, loosen the straps slightly.  Replace eyewear, if removed.

(f)  Test fit your respirator every time you put it on to ensure that it is properly adjusted by conducting negative and positive pressure test fits outlined below (refer to manufacturer's instruction manual for additional instructions on your respirator).

(29)  Continued integrity of respirator face piece seal shall be maintained per 29 CFR 1910.134(g)(1).  Preuse checks shall be performed prior to each use of the respirator to ensure an adequate seal is achieved as described in 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix B-1.  Operations in which respirators are used shall be routinely assessed to ensure that any changing worksite conditions or stressors are evaluated with respect to the effectiveness of respiratory protection being provided as described in 29 CFR 1910.134(g)(2).

(30)  Maintenance, care, and inspection of respirators shall be in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(h) and Appendix B-2, or procedures recommended by the manufacturer provided they are of equal effectiveness.  For hygiene purposes, respirators should be assigned to individual approved employees for personal use only; respirators should not be shared.  For disinfecting activities to eliminate the hantavirus or histoplasmosis fungus, always move away from a potentially contaminated area and into a clean area before removing respirator.

(31)  Always remove respirator after all other personal protective clothing.  Disinfect protective gloves, if worn, and while still on, remove respirator.  Unscrew air-purifying elements, soaked in a 1 part bleach to 8 parts watersolution, place in reclosable plastic bags, and dispose.  Wipe off outside of respirator face piece with paper towels dampened in 1:8 bleach and water solution if respirator has been worn as protection from hantavirus.  Place face piece in a plastic bag until it can be thoroughly cleaned. Disinfect gloves. Remove.

(32)  The respirator should be thoroughly cleaned after each use.  To do this, remove all detachable parts including the strap system, inhalation valve connectors, inhalation valves, exhalation valve seat, exhalation valve, and exhalation valve guard (refer to the manufacturer's instruction manual for figure showing parts), inspecting each part as you remove it.  Clean with warm soapy water, using a mild dish soap or Liquinox.  Rinse thoroughly with clean, warm water. Air dry all respirator parts before reassembling.  Reassemble and store in clean, reclosable plastic bag, keeping face piece separate from air-purifying elements.  Consult manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning, especially with regard to maximum water temperatures.  Respirators should be stored in a clean, dry environment, out of direct sunlight, extreme heat or cold, and areas where the face piece could become crimped or pinched.  Do not store your respirator or filters/cartridges in areas where oil, grease, gas, or other hazardous materials or their vapors may be present.

(33)  Breathing air quality and use for supplied air respirators shall be in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(i).  In addition, compressor systems used for supplying breathing air shall be of a type specifically designed for this purpose.

(34)  All NIOSH approvals, color codes, and markings shall be maintained on respiratory protection devices in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.134(j).  If color coding or other labeling becomes illegible, the device shall be destroyed and replaced with appropriate equipment.

(35)  Initial training must be provided before any personnel are required to wear a respirator. Training shall cover at minimum the topics listed in 29 CFR 1910.134(k)(1).  Retraining must be provided at least annually or more often as described in 29 CFR 1910.134(k)(5).  Personnel who wear respirators on a voluntary basis shall at minimum be provided the information contained in 29 CFR 1910.134, Appendix D.

(36)  Appropriate training, including documentation of the training through an employees signature indicating that training was received and that the employee understands the information, must be provided before an employee can be issued a respirator or assigned to a task that requires the use of a respirator.  All persons participating in the respiratory protection program must be provided training annually.  Training will include, but not be limited to, review of this document, with emphasis on hazard recognition, selection of respirators, and operating procedures.  Training certification is required.

(37)  Air-purifying respirators remove contaminants from the air; they do not supply air.  Air-purifying respirators are limited, therefore, to use in locations where the concentration of the oxygen is at least 19.5 percent.  They must be used only in atmospheres where the contaminant and its concentration are known.  Air-purifying respirators must not be used in immediately dangerous to life or health atmospheres.  When used in atmospheres containing gaseous contaminants and vapors, air-purifying respirators cannot be used when contaminants have poor warning properties.  When wearing an air-purifying respirator, physical effort is required to draw air through the air-purifying elements and breathing may seem somewhat restricted.  If the work requires physical exertion, breathing can become labored. If an employee perspires while working, wearing a respirator can become uncomfortable and difficult. Respirators limit communication between coworkers.  It is difficult to hear or be heard while wearing a respirator.

(38)  Per 29 CFR 1910.134(l), periodic RPP evaluations shall be performed as necessary to ensure effective implementation.  In addition, operations in which respirators are being used voluntarily should receive periodic evaluation to ensure that these operations have not altered or increased in hazard to a level that would make respirator use mandatory.

(39)  All RPP records shall be maintained as required by 29 CFR 1910.134(m).

 

18.5  Responsibilities.

A. Bureau Safety Manager/Bureau Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Provides technical assistance and guidance to Regional Safety Managers regarding respiratory protection issues, air monitoring, exposure assessment, and program requirements.

(2)  Establishes and monitors Bureau industrial hygiene contracts for air monitoring, as applicable.

(3)  Assesses the effectiveness of USGS RPP policy annually and modifies procedures and requirements, as necessary.

(4)  Evaluates Regional Headquarters and regional science program respiratory protection programs as feasible during field surveys.

(5)  Keeps abreast of the current technology in respiratory protection and ensures that resources are available to assist organizations in RPP administration and implementation.

B. Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Conduct periodic audits of Regional Headquarters and regional science respiratory protection programs in conjunction with program evaluations and provide recommendations for program improvement.

(2)  Assist Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Respiratory Protection Program/Safety Program Coordinators in arranging for or conducting appropriate respirator training.

(3)  Assist Regional Safety Officers and field level organizational management in development of individual and template respiratory protection plans, upon request.  A template plan may be at URL http://medical.smis.doi.gov/prog.htm.

(4)  Keep abreast of the latest technology of respiratory protection.

(5)  Establish and monitor Regional Headquarters industrial hygiene contracts for air monitoring, as applicable.

(6)  Provide technical assistance and review JHAs, air monitoring results, and RPPs, for adequacy and compliance with OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.134 and this Handbook.

C.  Regional Safety Officer.

(1)  Conduct periodic audits of regional science RPPs in conjunction with program evaluations and provide recommendations for program improvement.

(2)  Assist Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in arranging for or conducting appropriate respirator training and field level organizational management in development of individual and template respiratory protection plans, upon request. A template plan may be found at http://medical.smis.doi.gov/prog.htm.

(3)  Keep abreast of the latest technology in respiratory protection.

(4)  Establish and monitor science program industrial hygiene contracts for air monitoring, as applicable.

(5)  Provide technical assistance and review JHAs, air monitoring results, and RPPs, for adequacy and compliance with OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1910.134 and this Handbook.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(1)  Develop and update RPPs as necessary for all operations in which respiratory protection is utilized and communicate RPP to organizational employees.

(2)  Prepare and update, as needed, standard operating procedures.

(3)  Assist supervisors in implementing RPPs, respirator selection, coordinating fit testing, medical exams, and maintenance of associated RPP records.

(4)  Assist supervisors in the coordination of information and annual training on the correct use and maintenance of respirators.

(5)  Forward to the respective Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager all JHAs and RPPs for review, as applicable.

(6)  Coordinate air monitoring, exposure assessments, and any technical issues with the Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager as applicable, and with the Bureau Industrial Hygienist, if necessary.

(7)  Establish and monitor industrial hygiene contracts for air monitoring in coordination with the Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager, as applicable, and with the Bureau Industrial Hygienist, if necessary.

(8)  Evaluate the effectiveness of the program annually and document in writing in conjunction with the self conducted facility inspection and program assessment. The assessment should address the following topics and include information compiled during the course of the year to help determine if the program has been effective or if changes are needed.

(a)  Numbers of respirator users and their job classifications.

(b)  Types of respirators/elements used and a review of subject activities/operations.

(c)  Reviews and documentation of JHAs.

(d)  Maintenance and care.

(e)  Training.

(f)  Records and documentation (medical evaluations [dates and clearance statements] and qualitative fit tests, etc.).

E. Organizational Managers and Supervisors/Project Chiefs/Laboratory Supervisors.

(1)  Identify and evaluate hazards under their control and bring them to the direct attention of the respective CDSPC and/or Regional Safety Officer when assistance is needed for abatement.

(2)  Consider engineering controls such as contaminant isolation or enclosure, substitution of less or nontoxic materials, or exhaust ventilation in place of respiratory protection where feasible.

(3)  Implement RPPs as necessary for all operations in which respiratory protection is utilized.

(4)  Provide personnel fit testing, training and awareness in use, maintenance, inspection, and limitations of the specific type(s) of respiratory protection assigned for use.

(5)  Conduct medical evaluations.

(6)  Conduct qualitative fit tests of half-face or full-face respirators annually or when changes in the users physical conditions that could effect respirator fit are reported or observed.

(7)  Provide information and annual training on the correct use and maintenance of respirators.

(8)  Ensure personnel are not assigned tasks requiring respiratory protection until all requirements of this chapter are met with. Employees refusing medical surveillance not be assigned to tasks requiring respiratory protection.

(9)  Monitor personnel compliance with established RPPs and take corrective action where appropriate.

(10)  Identify and evaluate tasks that have potential to create a respiratory hazard using JHAs, as described in Chapter 2 of this Handbook, to evaluate tasks that may potentially expose personnel to respiratory hazards and to recommend the appropriate types/quantities of respirators needed.

(11)  Provide personnel with initial and any follow-up medical evaluation with a qualified physician or other licensed health care professional whenever respirators are in use.

(12)  Report positive evidence of exposure to the respective Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager as applicable through the Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator, and follow up with appropriate work area surveillance.

(13)  Maintain records of fit tests, medical clearance statements, and training, as necessary, to verify the requirements of this chapter.

(14)  Provide personnel with proper training and protection with the appropriate respirator and cartridges.  Respirator selection shall be made in consultation with the Collateral Duty Respiratory Protection Program and/or Safety Program Coordinator; Regional Safety Officer, Regional Safety Manager, Bureau Safety and Environmental Branch Industrial Hygienist, or other qualified individual such as the local respirator company representative, as necessary.

(15)  Maintain records of fit tests, medical clearance statements, and training, as necessary, to verify the requirements of this chapter.

F. Personnel.

(1)  Participate in all training and follow all safety/health instruction and standard operating procedures and personal protective equipment requirements.

(2)  Report any hazardous conditions, exposures, or unusual circumstances to supervisors.

(3)  Participate in medical surveillance and meet all physical requirements prior to respirator use to include maintaining clean shaven skin to ensure the best fit and seal where the respirator face piece contacts the face.

(4)  Properly maintain and care for individually issued respirators as outlined in the RPP and manufacturer instructions and document use and maintenance checks.

(5)  Inspect individually issued respirators prior to each use; clean, disinfect, and inspect after each use for damage; and report any respirator damage immediately to immediate supervisor.

(6)  Conduct formal qualitative or quantitative fit testing and perform a fit check of the respirator before each use, in accordance with established SOPs, manufacturer recommendations, and training instructions. Ensure that the respirator is equipped with the proper air-purifying elements.

(7)  Participate in respiratory training and be knowledgeable in nature of the hazards present in the workplace and in the selection of the appropriate respiratory protection for the task.  Users must ensure the ambient atmospheric oxygen content of the work environment is at least 19.5 percent by volume.

(8)  Wear/use respirator(s) as required by this program and only the model(s) for which they have been fit tested when conditions warrant and per manufacturer instructions for operation.  Become familiar with the respirator in an uncontaminated atmosphere. Any employee who has reservations about wearing a respirator should discuss this with the supervisor or the program coordinator before work at a potentially contaminated site begins.

G.  Contracting Officer Representatives.  Coordinate to assure all USGS contractors establish a respiratory protection program in compliance with OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134.

 

18.6. Additional Resources.

A.  Respiratory Protection OSHA 3079 (1998).

B.  DHHS (NIOSH) Pub. No. 96-101, Guide to the Selection and Use of Particulate Respirators Certified under 42 CFR 84.

C.  DHHS (NIOSH) Pub. No. 87-116, NIOSH Guide to Industrial Respiratory Protection.

D.  OSHA Interpretations on Respiratory Protection.

E.  Respiratory Selection Guide NIOSH Pub No. 87-108, NIOSH Respirator Decision Logic.

F.  ANSI Z88.2-1992, Standard for Respiratory Protection.

G.  OSHA Respiratory Protection Advisor.

H.  USGS 445-2-H, Appendix 26-2, Selection Guide for Respirator Protection.

Appendix 18-1: Selection Guide for Respiratory Protection

 

 

CHAPTER 19

Hearing Conservation Program

Instruction:  This chapter was updated to reflect U.S. Geological Survey organizational changes.

 

1.  Purpose.  To establish policy and procedures to protect employees from occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

 

2.  Scope.  This policy applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and those who work under USGS funding or direction.

 

3.  References.

A.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure.

B.  29 CFR 1910.95 Appendix A, Noise Exposure Computation.

C.  29 CFR 1910.95 Appendix B, Methods for Estimating the Adequacy of Hearing Protector Attenuation.

D.  Department of the Interior Occupational Medicine Program Handbook, 485 DM 18.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  When information (e.g., an initial exposure assessment, sound level measurements, complaints, job hazard analysis, etc.) indicates that any employee's exposure may equal or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels, A-weighted (dBA), representative personal exposure monitoring shall be conducted.  Exposure assessment requirements are found in SM 445-2-H.51, Industrial Hygiene Program.

B.  The hearing conservation program requirements of 29 CFR 1910.95 shall be instituted when employee noise exposure is equal to or exceeds an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 dBA.  Program requirements include:

(1)  Annual audiograms.

(2)  Annual hearing conservation training.

(3)  Use of hearing protection devices that attenuate noise exposures to an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 dBA.

(4)  Notification to affected employees regarding noise monitoring and annual audiogram results. 

C.  Sound level measurements shall be collected of suspected hazardous noise areas or hazardous noise generating sources (e.g., mechanical rooms, powered tools, and other equipment).

D.  Signs or labels shall be posted at the entrance to any work area or on any piece of equipment that produces noise levels at or above 85 dBA.

E.  Employees shall wear hearing protection where noise levels equal or exceed 85 dBA.

F.  Feasible administrative or engineering controls shall be utilized where employee exposure is 90 dBA or greater, as an 8-hour time-weighted average.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs hearing conservation program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to implement and comply with the hearing conservation program.

(2)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with hearing conservation program requirements.

(3)  Ensure that program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official. 

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective hearing conservation program.

(2)  Assigns hearing conservation authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

(3)  Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to support a hearing conservation program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  

(1)  Assigns program management, administration, and operational program support responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(2)  Ensures that safety staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support national capabilities and regional program needs.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the hearing conservation program.

(2)  Ensures the development of hearing conservation program policy and guidance.

F.  Industrial Hygienist(s).

(1)  Develop policy, guidance, protocols, program goals, and objectives.

(2)  Provide guidance and services to mission area, office, and regional programs to facilitate compliance with Federal and Department of the Interior (DOI) statutes and regulations and USGS program requirements.

(3)  Assess exposure trends and proposes initiatives for the prevention of occupational noise-induced hearing loss.

(4)  Coordinate with mission areas, offices, and regional staff to facilitate local implementation of the hearing conservation program.
  
(5)  Provide industrial hygiene technical assistance such as conducting noise exposure assessments, directing noise exposure monitoring, developing site-specific procedures, and implementing hearing conservation program elements.

(6)  Develop and implements monitoring strategies for representative noise monitoring.

(7)  Provide appropriate orientation and training to local employees who perform noise exposure monitoring.

(8)  Enter exposure assessments and noise monitoring data into the DOI Exposure Assessment Web site.

(9)  Enter findings from exposure assessments, monitoring, and special investigations requiring cost center action into the DOI Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(10)  Notify managers and employees of noise exposure monitoring and assessment results within timeframe specified by OSHA regulations.

G.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide direction and oversight for the administration of the hearing conservation program, serving as the focal point for regional compliance and program implementation; and providing technical advice to Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(2)  Assist management and CDSPCs in obtaining exposure assessments and noise exposure monitoring support with consultation and participation of the Industrial Hygienist(s).

(3)  Evaluate the effectiveness of the hearing conservation program requirements during inspections, and make recommendations for improving implementation.

(4)  Track and monitor abatement of hearing conservation program findings in the IAS.

Note:  The OSH Management Branch (OSHMB) National Program Section staff shall provide services detailed in 19.5.G.(1-4) above for Associate Directors.

H.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate funding resources are provided for noise control measures to abate occupational exposures to noise.

(2)  Ensure that employee noise exposures are assessed and monitored through coordination with the respective Regional Safety Manager or the OSHMB National Program Section staff and Industrial Hygienist(s), as applicable.

(3)  Ensure that employees who conduct noise exposure monitoring are appropriately trained (e.g., monitoring equipment operations and calibration, monitoring protocols, etc.).

(4)  Ensure that affected employees are informed of noise exposure monitoring results.

(5)  Provide hearing protection devices that attenuate noise levels below 85 dBA.

(6)  Implement feasible engineering controls or administrative controls to reduce noise exposures below 90 dBA as an 8-hour time-weighted average and impact noise below 140 dBA impact noise.

(7)  Provide annual audiograms and hearing conservation training to employees exposed at or above 85 dBA as an 8-hour time-weighted average. 

(8)  Notify the affected employee and take appropriate measures outlined in 29 CFR 1910.95 when annual audiogram results indicate a standard threshold shift.

(9)  Report an occurrence of a standard threshold shift in Safety Management Information System (SMIS).

(10)  Investigate occurrences of standard threshold shifts and document investigation in SMIS.

(11)  Ensure that the center’s hearing conservation program findings are documented in the IAS and abated.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators. 

(1)  Assist organizational managers and supervisors in the implementation of the hearing conservation program.  A sample hearing conservation program is found in Appendix 19-A, Sample Hearing Conservation Program.

(2)  Coordinate noise exposure assessments and monitoring with the Regional Safety Manager or the OSHMB National Program Section staff and the Industrial Hygienist(s).

(3)  Assist organizational managers and supervisors in notifying affected employees of the results of exposure monitoring and annual audiograms.

(4)  Evaluate hearing protection effectiveness in use at the site with the assistance of the Industrial Hygienist(s).

J.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with requirements to use engineering controls, administrative and work practice controls, and personal protective equipment.

(2)  Comply with the requirements of the hearing conservation program.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              October 9, 2015
                                                                                               ______________________
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                      Date
Associate Director for Administration 

 

 

CHAPTER 20

Hazard Communication Protection Program

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to include changes to the hazard communication standards and to the Bureau’s organizational structure and roles and responsibilities.

 

1.  Purpose.  To implement the requirements of a hazard communication program through which information is provided to USGS employees about the hazardous chemicals they use, handle, and procure, and to which they are exposed.  This includes labeling and other forms of warnings, safety data sheets, and employee information and training.

 

2.  Scope.

A.  The hazard communication program applies to all USGS employees who use or purchase chemicals, prepare chemical solutions and mixtures (including preparing laboratory chemical mixtures), or are otherwise exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace.

B.  Requirements in this chapter for labeling, maintaining a list of hazardous chemicals, safety data sheets, and information and training, are applicable to use and handling of chemicals within the laboratory.  Further requirements for handling and using laboratory chemicals are found in SM 445-2-H.21 Laboratory Protection Program.

C.  Packaging, marking, and labeling of chemicals for transport shall, at a minimum, be in accordance with 49 CFR 172.

 

3.  Reference.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.1200 Hazard Communication.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Each USGS workplace that uses and/or handles hazardous materials shall implement and maintain a written hazard communication program that specifies the requirements for labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and employee information and training.  The written program shall be readily available to employees. A written Hazard Communication Program template is available internally and may be downloaded from http://internal.usgs.gov/ops/safetynet/templateprograms.html.

Exception: For use of chemicals within the laboratory, the laboratory’s Chemical Hygiene Plan shall be implemented in accordance with SM 445-2-H.21 Laboratory Protection Program.  

B.  A list of the hazardous chemicals known to be present at each site shall be maintained and shall be periodically updated to reflect the chemicals at each site.  The list shall include a product identifier that is referenced on the appropriate safety data sheet, the chemical name, chemical quantity/unit of measurement, location (building and room), chemical hazard classification, and the custodian name/telephone number. 

C.  The local written hazard communication program shall have provisions for providing contractors with hazardous chemical information when necessary.

D.  Contracts shall require the contractor to provide safety data sheets to the facility Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator or Regional Safety Manager, as applicable, for hazardous chemicals brought on to USGS property by the contractor.

E.  Labeling.

(1)  All chemical containers shall be appropriately labeled as follows:

(a)  With the manufacturer’s label that includes, the product identifier, signal word, hazard statements, pictograms, precautionary statements, and the name, address, and telephone number of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party, or

(b)  With a workplace label that includes the product identifier and words, pictures, symbols, or combination thereof, and which provides general information regarding the hazards of the chemicals.

(2)  Labels on containers of hazardous chemicals shall not be removed or defaced.

(3)  All secondary containers (i.e., beakers, flasks, bottles, safety cans) shall be labeled if the container’s contents are not used up within the same work shift or if the container is transported away from the immediate work area.  Labeling of secondary containers shall comply with this section.  Chemical formulas or nonspecific names such as “Mixture A” are not acceptable identifiers.

(4)  Laboratories that prepare hazardous chemical solutions or mixtures for shipping or use by another site shall label containers of prepared mixtures or solutions leaving the laboratory.  Labels of prepared solutions and mixtures shall include the information detailed in 29 CFR 1910.1200, Appendix C.   

F.  Safety Data Sheets.

(1)  The chemicals’ safety data sheets received shall be maintained in the workplace for each hazardous chemical, and shall be readily accessible during each work shift to employees when they are in their work area.

(2)  Laboratories that prepare hazardous chemical solutions or mixtures for shipping or use by another site shall develop a safety data sheet for the solution or mixture and forward the safety data sheet to the user.

(a)  Safety data sheets developed by the laboratory shall include the specific sections and information detailed in 29 CFR 1910.1200 Appendix D.

(b)  Information from the safety data sheets of individual components of mixtures or solutions prepared by the laboratory may be used in developing the safety data sheet for the new solution or mixture.

(3)  Safety data sheets for chemicals no longer used shall be maintain by the cost center for the purpose of retrieval as historical and exposure documentation for investigations, site decommissioning, clean up, etc., as needed.  Safety data sheets must be maintained as exposure records for 30 years per 29 CFR 1910.1020. 

G.  Information and Training.

(1)  Employees shall be provided with effective information and training on hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial assignment, and whenever a new chemical hazard is introduced into their work area.  Training shall be for each chemical or chemical classification, as appropriate e.g., flammables, caustics.  Chemicals with unique hazard(s) shall be addressed specifically.

(2)  Information shall include:

(a)  The requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1200 Hazard Communication.

(b)  Any operations in their work area where hazardous chemicals are present.

(c)  The location and availability of the written hazard communication program, including the list of hazardous chemicals and safety data sheets.

(3)  Training shall include:

(a)  Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area, such as exposure monitoring, continuous monitoring devices, visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released, etc.

(b)  The physical characteristics and hazards of workplace chemicals.

(c)  Measures employees can take to protect themselves from these hazards, including specific procedures implemented to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals, such as appropriate work practices, emergency procedures, and personal protective equipment to be used.

(d)  Details of the hazard communication program, including an explanation of the labels on containers and the workplace labeling system, safety data sheet, and how employees can obtain and use the information.

H.  Procedures shall be established for controlling the procurement of chemicals to prevent excess stockpiles, reviewing and approving high hazard or restricted chemicals, and tracking and discarding expired chemicals.

I.  Contractors and visitors to a site where hazardous chemicals are used by Bureau employees shall comply with safety precautions that meet the same level of protection as required of Bureau employees as a condition of remaining in the area.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Hazard Communication Program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official, who, for the Bureau, is the Associate Director for Administration

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to local sites to implement and comply with the hazard communication program.

(2)  Ensure managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with hazard communication requirements.

(3)  Ensure program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.  Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish and maintain a bureau-wide hazard communication program.

D. Chief, Office of Management Services

(1)  Assigns Hazard Communication responsibilities to the Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for Bureau program management and administration.

(2)  Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities industrial hygiene needs.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Develops Bureau-wide hazard communication program policy and guidance documents.

(2)  Oversees the implementation of the hazard communication program.

(3)  Evaluates bureau-wide program implementation providing feedback to senior management on successes and gaps in the bureau program.

(4)  Provides program and technical guidance in implementing the hazard communication program.

(5)  Provides for tools to facilitate implementation of the bureau hazard communication program, as needed.

(6)  Assist the national capabilities and facilities in developing and implementing written hazard communication programs.

(7)  Conduct program evaluations to assess the effectiveness of regional and national capabilities hazard communication programs in accordance with SM 445-2-H.5 Program Evaluations.

(8)  Conduct external audits of national capabilities programs that include auditing compliance with hazard communication program requirements.

(9)  Assist national capabilities management and their safety personnel in the development of site hazard communication programs, and the completion and updating of hazardous chemical lists.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide guidance and assistance to local sites, as appropriate, in implementing the hazard communication program.

(2)  Annually assess regional program effectiveness and make recommendations for improvements.

(3)  Review chemical lists during external inspections and audits.

(4)  Assist regional and center management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in the development of site hazard communication programs, and the completion and updating of hazardous chemical lists.

G.  Science Center Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Maintain an updated list of hazardous chemicals used by their employees and/or stored at their sites.

(2)  Make safety data sheets readily available to employees during all shifts.

(3)  Monitor procurement of hazardous chemicals to prevent excess or duplicate chemical orders.

(4)  Ensure employee compliance with hazard communication program requirements.

(5)  Ensure employees receive hazard communication training and required information.

(6)  Document employee hazard communication training.

(7)  Establish and implement a written hazard communication program at all facilities within their jurisdiction.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist cost and science center management in maintaining and updating hazardous chemical lists and safety data sheets.

(2)  Assist supervisors in coordinating, conducting, and documenting employee hazard communication training.

(3)  Assist supervisors in maintaining a list of restricted chemicals that should only be purchased with the approval of management or designated representative.

(4)  Assist supervisors in evaluating hazard communication program compliance to assure a written hazard communication program is established and implemented within their jurisdiction.

I.  Employees.

(1)  Participate in hazard communication training and comply with hazard communication program requirements, guidance, standard operating procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment requirements.

(2)  Report to supervisors any hazardous conditions, exposures, or unusual circumstances that result in use or release of hazardous chemicals.

(3)  Periodically review safety data sheets and other information on hazardous chemicals prior to use to ensure the understanding of the chemical hazards and precautions to take.

 

Paul M. McEnrue /s/_____________________________    _8/22/2014_____
Paul M. McEnrue                                                                   Date
Acting Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 21

Laboratory Protection Program

 

21.1 Purpose. To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for providing personnel adequate protection from chemical, physical, and/or biological stressors, such as noise, chemical exposures, excessive temperatures, dusts, mists, and vapors within the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS).

 

21.2 References.

A.  29 CFR 1910.1450, Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories.

B.  29 CFR 1910.1450, Appendix A, National Research Council Recommendations Concerning Chemical Hygiene in Laboratories.

C.  29 CFR 1910.1200, Hazard Communication.

 

21.3 Scope.

A.  The purpose of this chapter is to define the policy and procedures for the implementation of the USGS Laboratory Protection Program.  This chapter applies to all USGS personnel with potential for on-the-job exposure to chemical and biological hazards in laboratory environments, and defines organizational responsibilities applicable to laboratory start-up, transfer, and closure.  The goal is to provide USGS personnel with a safe laboratory working environment by ensuring that laboratories are operated from start-up to closure in compliance with Federal, State, and local safety, health, and environmental regulations.  Shops and other locations where hazardous materials are used in other than laboratory situations shall comply with Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) requirements (Chapter 20).

B.  Careful planning is the key to minimizing the potential hazards associated with laboratory work activities.  Laboratory work activities include sampling and collection of samples, storage of bottles in a vehicle, transportation to the project office, processing bottles for shipment, receiving, preparing, analyzing, storing, and disposing of samples.

C.  To protect USGS laboratory personnel and property, a Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) is required for activities where multiple chemical procedures and/or small quantities of hazardous materials are used on a laboratory scale. A template CHP is available for downloading at http://medical.smis.doi.gov/prog.htm.

 

21.4. Requirements.

A.  A laboratory specific CHP shall be developed for each laboratory using hazardous materials. A generic template CHP that can be tailored to meet location needs is located at http://medical.smis.doi.gov/prog.htm.

B.  Laboratory personnel shall be provided with chemical information and training in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1450(f).

C.  Medical surveillance shall be provided to laboratory personnel as required by 29 CFR 1910.1450(g).  Female personnel of childbearing age shall be informed of reproductive hazards in the laboratory.  These personnel shall notify their supervisors as soon as pregnancy is known and shall be referred for medical consultation.  If after consulting a physician, the individual requests a change of work assignment, reasonable effort shall be made to accommodate the request.

D.  Liquid and solid hazardous materials and waste must be handled and disposed of in accordance with the transportation and handling procedures as outlined in the Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations (DOT 49 CFR #171-173), and the disposal and containment of hazardous materials and waste, as outlined in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) regulations (USEPA 40 CFR #261 and #262).

(1)  Collecting and Processing Samples.

(a)  All samples must be treated as hazardous and potentially biohazardous.

(b)  Strict personal hygiene must be enforced when processing samples.

(c)  Use of personal protective equipment or engineering controls must be available to prevent direct contact with the samples.

(d)  Plans, equipment, and materials for decontamination of known or potential hazards must be available.

(e)  Procedures that maintain chain-of-custody requirements must be established, followed, and documented.

(f)  Secure sample storage space must be available at the sampling sites and project/office laboratories.

(2)  Packaging and Labeling Samples.  Samples shall be carefully packaged the same way as regular samples; however, they are to be clearly labeled and segregated from regular samples by double bagging them separately.

(a)  Individual sample bottles and shipping packages (coolers/ice chests) shall be clearly labeled.

(b)  The shipping packages shall be carefully sealed with tape to prevent the top of the package from opening during transit.

(3)  Analytical Service Request.  In addition to the usual information (site identification, coordinates, schedules, laboratory codes, field data, and other information), it is important to record in the “remarks” section any unusual occurrences observed while inspecting or working at the site.  Unusual occurrences could be odor, color, quality of the run-off streams, and so forth.  The information provided will warn laboratory workers of known hazards so that they can wear appropriate personal protective equipment.

(4)  Laboratory Handling of Sample Bottles.

(a)  A written procedure of receiving and processing samples must be established.  The procedure must include safety practices dealing with breakage and spillage of samples inside the shipping containers.

(b)  All samples known or suspected to be hazardous shall be flagged appropriately to warn laboratory workers of known hazards/unusual occurrences at the site.

(c)  Coolers/ice chests used to ship samples shall be cleaned (decontaminated) if there is any breakage or spillage from the samples.

(5)  Chemical Procurement.

(a)  The least amount of chemical necessary to perform the assigned work shall be ordered.  For chemicals where there is a long term recurring need blanket purchase orders should be established so chemicals can be ordered as required and not stockpiled within the lab.

(b)  Prior to ordering new chemicals, safety and health data for that chemical shall be reviewed to determine if there are any special use, handling, storage, or disposal requirements that cannot be presently accommodated in the laboratory.

(c)  Every effort shall be made to minimize quantities and volumes of hazardous materials and wastes used and generated.

(6)  Mailing of Hazardous Materials.  Certain hazardous materials that cannot be mailed and others that need special preparation before mailing.  Personnel are responsible for compliance with postal laws and regulations governing preparation and mailing, as well as other laws and regulations pertaining to the shipment of harmful matter.  Detailed information on special mailing rules and regulations are contained in the “Domestic Mail Manual” (DMM), TL-5, 7/7/81, issue 6.  The following extractions from that publication describe harmful matter that should not be mailed and the procedure to follow if chemicals must be mailed.

(a)  Part 124.142 describes harmful matter as follows: “Harmful matter also includes that which is likely to destroy, deface, or otherwise damage the mails or postal equipment, or which is likely to harm postal employees, such as caustic poisons (acids and alkalies), oxidizing materials, or highly flammable liquids, gases or solids; or which is likely under conditions incident to transportation to cause fires through friction, through absorption of moisture, through spontaneous chemical changes, or as a result of retained heat from manufacturing or processing; explosives or containers previously used for shipping high explosives having a liquid ingredient (such as dynamite); ammunition; fireworks; radioactive materials; matches; or articles emitting obnoxious odors.”

(b)  Part 124.31 discusses chemicals as follows: “The great variety of chemical compositions precludes the listing of each such item that may be mailed and each such item that may not be mailed. The acceptability of chemicals for mailing generally depends upon container fluid/vapor capacities, the ability of the complete package to contain the product, and the method of absorbing and containing the product in case of accidental leakage of the primary container.  To permit mail determinations on specific products, the following information is required.  This information on the chemical and physical properties of a product coupled with consultation with the local postmaster will allow a determination to be made on whether or not a chemical is acceptable in the mails.  Acids in vials should be considered non-mailable.  Procurement of all chemicals with shipment direct from the supplier or the central laboratory to your organization will insure proper shipment with a minimum chance of accidental breakage.”

(i) Name of material.

(ii) Chemical composition by percentage of ingredients.

(iii) Flash point.

(iv) Toxic properties.

(v) Irritant action to eyes and skin.

(vi) Special precautions necessary to permit handling to avoid harm to postal personnel or property or other mail matter.

(vii) Explanation of warning labels required by State or Federal regulations.

(viii) Proposed method of packaging.

(7)  Exposure Control and Monitoring.

(a)  All chemical exposures, regardless of toxicity, shall be minimized.

(b)  To minimize exposure to all chemical operations in the laboratory, even those involving chemicals of low toxicity, should be carried out within a laboratory fume hood.

(c)  Generally air monitoring is not justified if chemical operations are performed by trained personnel under properly functioning laboratory fume hoods.  However, air monitoring shall be performed if there is reason to believe exposure levels may exceed the action level for that substance.

(d)  Laboratory start-up, closure, or modification shall be coordinated with the appropriate Collateral Duty Safety/Environmental Program Coordinator or Regional Safety Manager/Officer as applicable, as soon as possible but no less than 90 daysprior to proposed action.

(e)  Hazardous laboratory waste should be disposed of in accordance with locally established guidelines in compliance with this Handbook.  CHP’s include written spill cleanup procedures in effect for handling sample and identify spill cleanup equipment and material.  These items must be available, and personnel must have a clear understanding of how to use them.  The location of these items must be easily accessible wherever a spill could occur.

(f)  Current chemical inventories shall be maintained for all laboratories.

(g)  Chemicals with a health hazard rating of 3 or higher, as shown in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) shall have a minimum average hood face velocity of 80 feet per minute.  Chemicals with highly toxic, carcinogenic, or reproductive hazards should have a hood equipped with an alarm that activates if centerline face velocity drops below 80 feet per minute.  If hood average face velocities exceed 150 feet per minute then smoke testing will be used to determine detrimental air turbulence created by the hood.  Immediate corrective action shall be taken or the operation halted.

(8)  USGS protocols for collecting, shipping, and analyzing samples that may contain pfiesteria.  Pfiesteria are microscopic marine dinoflagellates that produce toxins that have caused fish kills and lesions on fish in coastal waters along the eastern United States. Human health effects from exposure to pfiesteria toxins include flu-like symptoms, skin disorders, respiratory infections, and memory loss.  Human health effects result from two primary pathways: inhaling chemical toxins produced by certain life stages of the organism, and direct contact with water, bottom sediments, or fish affected by pfiesteria.  The effects on humans can be treated medically. Additional information on the human health impacts of pfiesteria can be found at the USGS Web site http://www.neuseriver.org/pfiester_2.html.

(9)  Sample Disposal Procedures. The storage and disposal procedure of samples and laboratory waste streams must be followed in accordance with the appropriate USEPA regulations.  Documentation is the determining factor to establish baselines for appropriate disposal.

 

21.5 Responsibilities.

 

A.  Bureau Safety Manager/Bureau Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Evaluates the effectiveness of the USGS laboratory protection program annually and modifies procedures and requirements on a Bureau, as necessary.

(2)  Evaluates Regional Headquarters/regional science program and laboratory protection programs during on-site evaluations as feasible.

(3)  Keeps abreast of current laboratory technology, provide technical assistance, and assists organizations in administration and implementation of the laboratory protection program.

B. Regional Safety Manager.

(1)  Provides regional laboratory protection program guidance and oversight.

(2)  Evaluates the effectiveness of the regional laboratory protection program annually and takes actions to assist in program improvement/enhancement, as necessary.

(3)  Provides assistance to Regional Safety Officers in development of CHP’s.

(4)  Evaluates Regional Headquarters and regional science programs and plans to include procedures for laboratory startup, modification and closure during on-site inspections and assessments to provide uniform quality and implementation.

(5)  Provides assistance to Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety and Environmental Program Coordinators and Chemical Hygiene Officers (CHO’s) in assessing start-ups, modifications, and closures of laboratories located at regional science program field facilities.

C. Regional Safety Officer.

(1)  Evaluates the effectiveness of science program field level laboratory protection programs during on-site evaluations and takes actions to assist in program improvement/enhancement, as necessary.

(2)  Provides assistance to field management and CHO’s in development of CHP’s.

(3)  Conducts reviews and monitoring functions of field level science programs and plans, as needed, to provide uniform quality and implementation.

(4)  Provides assistance to field level science program management and Collateral Duty Safety and Environmental Program Coordinators/CHO in development of laboratory start-up, modification, and closure.

D. Chemical Hygiene Officers (CHO’s).

(1)  Assist supervisors in the development of CHP’s, and review annually for completeness and accuracy in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1450 and the requirements of this chapter.

(2)  Coordinate with supervisors and employees to assure an inventory of hazardous materials is maintained for all assigned laboratories.

(3)  Coordinate and/or assist in conducting CHP employee training.

(4)  Assist supervisors and employees in obtaining MSDS’s and other hazardous chemical safety information.

(5)  Review all laboratory accidents involving hazardous chemicals and recommend steps to prevent recurrence of similar accidents.

(6)  Review procedures for procurement of lab chemicals ensuring procedures include provisions for obtaining organizational approval for ordering highly toxic or hazardous substances.

(7)  Coordinate or conduct laboratory hood face velocity measurements at least annually to determine adequacy, recording the average face velocity, date, and sash height at which the measurements were taken and assessor’s initials on the hood. If face velocities are inadequate the hood shall not be used for work with toxic chemicals until corrective action is taken.

E. Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC).

(1)  Provides assistance to the CHO and supervisors, as necessary, to assure implementation of CHP requirements and for laboratory startups, closures, and modifications.

(2)  Coordinates with Regional Safety Manager/Officer, as applicable, to review/approve field organizational documentation for lab start-up, modification, and closure and provides recommendations, as required.

F. Organizational Managers and Supervisors/Project Chiefs/Laboratory Supervisors.

(1)  Designate a CHO and provide appropriate training.

(2)  Implement a laboratory protection program in accordance with OSHA, DOI, and applicable USGS requirements for all laboratory facilities within their jurisdiction.

(3)  Coordinate laboratory start-up, closure, or modification with appropriate Collateral Duty Safety/Environmental Program Coordinator and/or Regional Safety Manager/Officer as soon as possible but no less than 90 days prior to proposed action. Accompany Collateral Duty Safety/Collateral Duty Environmental Program Coordinator and/or Regional Safety Manager/Officer personnel during inspection of subject laboratory and take corrective action as required to abate identified deficiencies.

(4)  Oversee the development and implementation of a written CHP and standard operating procedures (SOP’s) for all hazardous lab activities and review for appropriateness and update whenever laboratory operations change or at least annually.

(5)  Provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and mandate use by all personnel.

(6)  Maintain good housekeeping practices and verify that equipment such as safety showers, eyewashes, and ventilation systems are in good working order.

(7)  Provide laboratory personnel CHP training in accordance with this chapter.

(8)  Oversee the conduct of laboratory inspections and abatement of identified deficiencies in a timely manner.

(9)  Maintain an accurate chemical inventory for all laboratories.

(10)  Establish procedures for monitoring chemicals with expiration dates.

(11)  Establish a mechanism for supervisory approval before personnel are allowed to work with highly toxic or hazardous materials.

(12)  Provide personnel access to medical surveillance as required.

(13)  Provide personnel with information and training to ensure that they are apprised of the hazards of chemicals present in their work area.  Such information shall be provided at the time of personnel initial assignment to a work area where hazardous chemicals are present and prior to assignments involving new exposure situations with refresher training provided every 3 years.  Personnel initial and refresher training shall include methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical (such as monitoring conducted by the employer, continuous monitoring devices, visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released, etc.); the physical and health hazards of chemicals in the work area; the measures personnel can take to protect themselves from these hazards, including specific procedures the USGS has implemented to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals, such as appropriate work practices, emergency procedures, and protective equipment to be used; and applicable CHP details.

G. Personnel.

(1)  Properly store and label all chemical containers within the workplace.

(2)  Practice good personal hygiene around hazardous materials such as washing hands after handling chemicals, using and maintaining the clean condition of required PPE, not smoking, and not consuming or storing food/drink in areas where hazardous materials are used/stored.

(3)  Report to the line supervisor any hazardous conditions, exposures, or unusual circumstances associated with assigned operations.

(4)  Provide input in the development of CHP’s and SOP’s and plan and conduct all laboratory operations in accordance with established guidelines.

(5)  Participate in maintaining chemical inventories for their areas.

(6)  Participate in related safety, health, and environmental training programs.

 

21.6. Additional Resources.

(1)  Exposure Limits for Air Contaminants, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_toc/OSHA_Std_toc_1910_SUBPART_Z.htm

(2) Chemical Glove Resistance Guide, http://www.pp.okstate.edu/ehs/HAZMAT/Gloves.htm

(3) Chemical Compatibility Chart (Guide), http://bifrost.unl.edu/ehs/ChemicalInfo/comptabl.html

(4) Material Safety Data Sheet Search

http://internal.usgs.gov/ops/safetynet/msds.html (Internal Access Only)

(5) Chemical Reactivity Worksheet (NOAA) Terminology, http://response.restoration.noaa.gov/chemaids/react.html

(6) Chemical Emergency Response Guidebook, http://hazmat.dot.gov/gydebook.htm

(7) NIOSH Pocket Guide To Hazardous Chemicals, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/pgdstart.html

(8) Guidelines for Chemical Waste Management Water Resources Laboratories http://qwsu.er.usgs.gov/dan/index.html

 

 

CHAPTER 22

Formaldehyde Control Program

Instruction:  Changes to this chapter were made to reflect organizational changes and to modify the name of the chapter to Formaldehyde Control Program.

 

1.  Purpose.  The purpose of this chapter is to establish policy and procedures to protect employees from hazardous exposures to formaldehyde.

 

2.  Scope.  This policy applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and those who work under USGS funding or direction.

 

3. References.

A.  29 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 1910.1048, Formaldehyde.

B.  29 CFR 1910.1048 Appendix A, Substance Technical Guidelines for Formalin.

C.  29 CFR 1910.1048 Appendix B, Sampling Strategy and Analytical Methods for Formaldehyde.

D.  29 CFR 1910.1048 Appendix C, Medical Surveillance - Formaldehyde.

E.  29 CFR 1910.1048 Appendix D, Non-mandatory Medical Disease Questionnaire.

F.  29 CFR 1910.1200, Hazard Communication Standard.

G.  29 CFR 1910.1450, Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Chemicals in Laboratories.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Use, handling, and storage of formaldehyde and formaldehyde-containing solutions and gases shall comply with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1048, Formaldehyde.  Requirements include:

(1)  Conducting initial and periodic monitoring to determine employee exposures to formaldehyde using sampling strategies representative of employee’s full-shift and short-term exposures.

(2)  Implementing annual medical surveillance for employees exposed to airborne formaldehyde concentrations equal to or greater than the action level of 0.5 part per million (ppm) as an 8-hour time weighted average or the 15-minute short-term exposure limit (STEL) of 2 ppm; and enrolling employees, who demonstrate signs or symptoms of overexposure to formaldehyde or were exposed to formaldehyde during a mishap.

(3)  Implementing feasible engineering and work practice controls where employee exposures equal or exceed the permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 0.75 ppm as an 8-hour time weighted average or the STEL.

(4)  Establishing regulated areas, where practical, with proper posting of entrances to areas where exposures equal or exceed the PEL or STEL.

(5)  Using respiratory protection and implementing a respiratory protection program where engineering and work practice controls are not feasible or do not reduce exposure below the PEL and STEL.  A local respiratory protection program shall be implemented in accordance with SM 445-2-H.18 Respiratory Protection.

(6)  Providing personal protective equipment and hygiene facilities (e.g., emergency eyewashes or showers) where skin and eye contact may exist.

(7)  Communicating formaldehyde hazard information through safety data sheets, labeling, and annual training of employees working with formaldehyde or formaldehyde-containing solutions (e.g., formalin) and gases.

B.  Sample preservation and preparation with formalin and formalin mixing conducted in laboratories shall be performed using approved laboratory hoods or local exhaust ventilation.

C.  Isolate operations involving formaldehyde gas, such as sterilization, to prevent exposures to employees in adjacent areas.  Isolation may include measures such as the use of sterilization units, negative pressure rooms with dedicated exhaust, or other effective engineering or work practice controls, and designating the area as a regulated area.  Operations in the field involving formaldehyde gas shall be conducted so that employees and other individuals are not exposed to the gas (e.g., downwind).  These operations and control measures shall be documented in a job hazard analysis.

D.  Formaldehyde products such as formalin and specimen containers containing formalin shall be stored in a cool, well-ventilated area and in accordance with any additional requirements listed in the safety data sheet.

E.  Formaldehyde waste products shall be properly stored in a labeled hazardous waste container for proper disposal, in accordance with local hazardous waste requirements.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs formaldehyde control program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with the formaldehyde control program requirements.

(2)  Ensure that program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective formaldehyde control program.

(2)  Assigns authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Supervises the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager and provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management and administration of the formaldehyde control program.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager

(1)  Ensures the program management, administration, and operational support of the formaldehyde control program.

(2)  Ensures the development of policies and guidance on formaldehyde handling, use, and control practices.

(3)  Ensures compliance with statutory, regulatory, and program requirements and provides management with the necessary support and guidance to effectively fulfill formaldehyde control program policy commitments.

F.  Industrial Hygienist(s).

(1)  Establish a formaldehyde control program inclusive of policy, guidance, oversight, and assessment.

(2)  Provide technical assistance to mission areas, office, and regional staff in identifying, assessing, and controlling employee exposures to formaldehyde.

(3)  Enter formaldehyde exposure assessment and data into the Department of the Interior Exposure Assessment Web site and analyzes exposure data.

(4)  Coordinate with Regional Safety Managers and the Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch (OSHMB) National Program Section staff to ensure local implementation of the formaldehyde control policies, direction, and guidance.

(5)  Enter formaldehyde findings from exposure assessments, sampling, and special investigations into the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(6)  Provide technical support to mission areas, offices, and regions in identifying and assessing formaldehyde exposures and control measures.

(7)  Provide direction in implementing the medical surveillance program for formaldehyde.

G.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Validate, through inspections and external audits, that exposures to formaldehyde are evaluated and controlled.

(2)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) in obtaining industrial hygiene services to assess formaldehyde exposures, and in implementing the medical surveillance program for formaldehyde, when required.  Coordinate with Industrial Hygienists to obtain industrial hygiene services.

(3)  Track and monitor abatement of formaldehyde findings in IAS.

(4)  Provide technical guidance and assistance to CDSPCs in establishing annual employee training on the hazards and controls of formaldehyde and in communicating formaldehyde hazards through safety data sheets and labels.

Note:  OSHMB National Program Section staff shall provide services detailed in 22.5.G.(1-4) above for Associate Directors.

H.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of the formaldehyde control program.

(2)  Ensure that adequate funding resources are provided for control measures to abate formaldehyde exposures.

(3)  Ensure that formaldehyde exposures in the workplace are evaluated through coordination with their respective Regional Safety Manager or the OSHMB National Program Section staff and the Industrial Hygienists.

(4)  Ensure the utilization of feasible engineering controls, administrative controls and work practices, respiratory protection, and personal protective equipment.

(5)  Ensure that employees who are exposed to formaldehyde are provided annual training in formaldehyde.

(6)  Ensure that affected employees are informed of exposure monitoring results.

(7)  Ensure that mishaps involving exposures to formaldehyde are investigated and documented in the Safety Management Information System.

(8)  Ensure that formaldehyde findings from self-inspections are documented in IAS and are abated.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators

(1)  Assist organizational managers and supervisors in implementing requirements of the formaldehyde control program.  

(2)  Coordinate exposure monitoring and assessments with the Regional Safety Manager or the OSHMB National Program Section staff and the Industrial Hygienists.

J.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with requirements to use engineering controls, administrative and work practice controls, respirators, and personal protective equipment.

(2)  Report to their supervisor or local CDSPC any concerns regarding formaldehyde exposures or mishaps.

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              October 19, 2015
                                                                                                   ______________________ 
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                     Date 
Associate Director for Administration  

 

 

 

CHAPTER 23

Medical Surveillance

Instruction: Chapter revised to include changes in organizational structure and chapter name; deletes definitions; revises and reorganizes information in Appendix A; and deletes Appendices B, C and D.  In addition, Human Resource responsibilities were removed since the Office of Human Capital responsibilities are defined elsewhere in USGS policy.

 

1.  Purpose.  This chapter specifies medical evaluations as part of the Occupational Medicine Program requirements to ensure the safety and health of employees who may be exposed to occupational hazards as a result of assigned responsibilities.  The chapter addresses: 1) medical surveillance to medically monitor possible health effects due to occupational exposures; 2) post-exposure medical evaluations for exposure from biological mishaps; 3) exposure-driven immunizations to protect against occupationally acquired diseases; and 4) medical evaluations to meet implemented medical standards and physical requirements.

 

2.  Scope.  This chapter applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and volunteers who are required to receive medical evaluations based on exposure risk.  The term “employees” in this chapter includes USGS employees and others for whom the Government assumes workers’ compensation liability.  This chapter does not apply to employees participating in drug screening or wellness programs.

 

3.  References.

A.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees; February 26, 1980.

B.  Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR), Parts 1910, 1915, 1917, 1918, and 1926.

C.  Department of the Interior (DOI) Manual, Part 485, Safety and Occupational Health Program, Chapter 17, Industrial Hygiene Program, and Chapter 18, Occupational Medicine Program.

D.  Department of the Interior (DOI) Occupational Medicine Program Handbook, latest revision.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Publication 3162, Screening and Surveillance: A Guide to OSHA Standards.

F.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Yellow Book, Health Information for International Travel, latest revision.

G.  Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule (current year).

H.  Survey Manual 370.792.1 - Preventive Medical Treatment

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  General.

(1)  Medical evaluations include physical evaluations and clinical laboratory testing.  Medical evaluations must be performed by an occupational medicine physician or other licensed health care professional under the direction of an occupational medicine physician, as described in the DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

(2)  Employee participation in medical evaluations is mandatory when required by OSHA standards, federal regulations, or DOI policies; or when determined necessary by an occupational medicine physician or a licensed health care professional and USGS.

(3)  Medical evaluations shall be provided to employees at no cost.

(4)  Cost centers are authorized to designate an occupational medicine provider for medical evaluations.  The cost center shall consider any medical documentation the employee wants to submit from a personal physician in accordance with 5 CFR 339.303.  If an occupational medicine provider is not available (e.g., remote locations), employees may use the services of their personal physician, as described in the DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook. USGS Survey Manual 370.792.1 Preventive Medical Treatment, contains for directions on obtaining reimbursement for the services of a personal physician.

B.  Medical Surveillance.

(1)  Medical surveillance utilizes clinical laboratory tests and physical examinations to medically screen for abnormal biological effects before clinical symptoms appear.  The purpose of medical surveillance is to look for abnormal trends in the health status of employees exposed to chemical or physical hazards, in order to implement corrective action to prevent or limit disease progression by controlling exposures or providing medical intervention.

(2)  Employees must be included in a medical surveillance program when required by an OSHA specific substance standard.  Refer to Appendix A listing medical surveillance requirements in the OSHA specific substance standards.

(3)  In the absence of OSHA-mandated medical surveillance, if exposure monitoring reveals that personal exposures routinely exceed OSHA Permissible Exposure Limits or American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values, and the exposure levels cannot be controlled through engineering controls, work practices, or administrative controls, employees must be enrolled in a medical surveillance program as determined by the occupational medicine physician or licensed health care professional, an industrial hygienist, and employee management.  (NOTE: When exposure cannot be controlled by engineering controls, work practices, or administrative controls the use of appropriate personal protection equipment, such as respirators and hearing protection, is required.  Medical surveillance is still required regardless of the use of respirators. Refer to SM 445-2-H, Chapter 18 - Respiratory Protection Program and Chapter 19 - Hearing Conservation Program.

(4)  Employees who experience signs or symptoms of exposure to chemical or physical hazards or are involved in an exposure incident must be provided an opportunity for a medical evaluation.

(5)  The physician’s written opinion, of an abnormal medical evaluation relevant to an exposure, must be reported to employee management in addition to the employee.  The employee management must inform and provide the written opinion to the responsible safety office and the industrial hygienist for the purpose of investigating the cause of an abnormal medical evaluation result, and to assist in mitigating the cause.  Requirements of the Privacy Act and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act must be followed when communicating a physician opinion.

(6)  When medical surveillance is required, it must include a baseline medical evaluation conducted prior to assignment to a task and followed by periodic examinations.  The frequency of periodic examinations shall be determined by the appropriate OSHA standard. Where OSHA standards are not available, the periodicity shall be determined by the occupational medicine physician or occupational health care professional.

(7)  A termination examination is only required if specified in an OSHA standard.

(8)  Periodic medical evaluations are not required for routine work with infectious agents; however, it may be appropriate to offer targeted periodic evaluations to workers with substantial risk of exposure to infectious agents to detect preclinical or subclinical evidence of an occupationally acquired infection.  A risk assessment should be conducted by the laboratory manager or a knowledgeable subject matter expert, such as, but not limited to a microbiologist or Biosafety Officer, to assess the necessity of periodic medical evaluations based on potential risk of occupational exposure to infectious agents.  The DOI Medical Officer may be contacted directly or through the Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch for guidance on periodic medical evaluations for working with infectious agents.  Refer to the guidance in the Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories,5th edition.

(9)  Employees under the age of 18 will not be permitted to perform activities requiring medical surveillance as a result of employee exposures.

C.  Post-Exposure Evaluation.

(1)  For employees that work in endemic areas or handle potentially diseased wildlife or infectious agents, post-exposure evaluations, conducted by an occupational medicine physician or licensed health-care professional, shall be offered to employees who were exposed to an infectious agent during an incident or to employees who show signs or symptoms of exposure.  The post-exposure evaluation should be conducted by a physician or licensed health-care professional with knowledge of infectious diseases.

(2) Employees that are exposed to blood or other infectious materials from a human source shall follow the exposure incident protocol in SM 445-2-H.25, Human Bloodborne Pathogens Protection Program.

D. Vaccinations.

Employees that can be potentially exposed to infectious diseases shall be offered the appropriate vaccination, when available, prior to assignment of work. For specific vaccinations, refer to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) list of Vaccines Used in the United States or contact your servicing occupational medicine provider. For international travel, refer to the CDC website tool,Travelers’ Health, which lists the recommended vaccinations per country. Refer to the Office of Human Capital policy, Survey Manual 370.792.1 - Preventive Medical Treatment, for procedures for obtaining vaccinations.

E.  Medical Clearance for Established Medical Standards and Physical Requirements.

(1)  Certain job positions within DOI have established medical standards and physical requirements developed by DOI to determine if applicants and incumbents can safely perform the essential functions of the position.  These positions have medical clearance exam requirements to determine if the individual meets the established medical standards requirements for the position.  Tabs 8 and 12 of the DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook provide a list of job positions with developed Medical Standards.

(2)  Cost Centers have the authority to establish fitness for duty and/or physical requirements for certain positions that are determined to be arduous and hazardous.  This process shall be initiated by the affected Cost Center Director in collaboration with the Office of Human Capital.

F.  Recordkeeping.

(1)  Employee medical records must be maintained in accordance with the Office of Human Capital policies and procedures.  Contact your servicing Human Resources Specialist for instructions on forwarding and requesting medical records.

(2)  Medical records must be maintained for the duration of employment plus 30 years. (NOTE: SM 432-1-S1, General Records Disposition Schedule provides medical records retention and disposition schedules.)

(3)  Employees have the right to access their medical records in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 and must be provided access to their medical records in accordance with Office of Human Capital policies.

(4)  When employees use a personal physician to administer medical evaluations, as part of the requirements of the job position, medical information relevant to their position shall be submitted to the USGS or designated representative and maintained in accordance with the Office of Human Capital policy governing employee medical records.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Occupational Medicine Program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official/Associate Director for Administration.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective Occupational Medicine Program.

(2)  Assigns Occupational Medicine Program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

(3)  Assigns responsibility for development of policy and management of employee medical records to the Chief, Office of Human Capital.

C.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors. Ensure that respective region, mission area, or office implements and complies with Occupational Medicine Program requirements.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Assigns Occupational Medicine Program responsibilities to the Chief, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch, for program management and administration.

E.  Chief, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the Occupational Medicine Program.

(2)  Ensures the development of the Occupational Medicine Program policy.

F.  USGS Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Develops Occupational Medicine Program policy, guidance, and protocols; proposes bureau-wide program goals, objectives, and initiatives.

(2)  Monitors the implementation and effectiveness Occupational Medicine Program policies, guidelines, and processes through program evaluation to ensure the integrity of the program.

(3)  Provides technical assistance and guidance regarding the Occupational Medicine Program.

(4)  Acts as liaison to the DOI Industrial Hygiene Working Group and other DOI bureaus, representing USGS interests in the Occupational Medicine Program.

(5)  Establishes and monitors Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch contracts and interagency agreements for occupational medicine services.

G.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of the Occupational Medicine Program when required.

(2)  Validate through inspections and audits that required elements of the Occupational Medicine Program are implemented in accordance with policy and regulations.  Tracks and ensures abatement of findings in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(3)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in obtaining occupational medicine services.

H.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate funding and resources are provided to implement elements of the Occupational Medicine Program.

(2)  Ensure that a significant illness diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional is entered into the Safety Management Information System, and the cause is investigated and mitigated.

(3)  Ensure that investigation findings, program inspections findings, and audits findings are entered into IAS.

(4)  Ensure that medical records are handled, transferred, and maintained in accordance with the Office of Human Capital policy.

(5)  Ensure that employees are informed of their rights to access their exposure and medical records, upon initial employment and annually thereafter, in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020.

(6)  Ensure that employees receive medical surveillance baseline evaluations, medical clearances, and pre-employment or pre-placement medical evaluations prior to assignment to positions requiring medical evaluation.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers and supervisors in the implementation of the Occupational Medicine Program.

(2)  Assist managers and supervisors in establishing occupational medicine services.

(3)  Assist managers and supervisors in identifying employees who require participation in the Occupational Medicine Program.

J.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with requirements to the Occupational Medicine Program.

(2)  Report to their supervisors or Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators any concerns regarding exposures, exposure events, and illnesses.

Appendix 23-A: OSHA Standards Requiring Medical Surveillance

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                August 8, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Associate Director for Administration
 

 

 

CHAPTER 24

Occupational Medicine - Prevention of Zoonotic and Vector-Borne Diseases in the Field

Instruction: Chapter 24 was revised to incorporate requirements for awareness, recognition, and prevention of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases encountered in the field.  The requirement for a Lyme Disease Protection Program and Appendices 24-1, 24-2, and 24-3 were removed.  Appendices 24.A and 24.B were added.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program requirements for protecting U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees engaged in activities where there is an increased risk of exposure to zoonotic and vector-borne diseases when conducting work in the field, including transporting biological materials in vehicles and storing biological materials in non-laboratory facilities.  This chapter does not apply to incidents involving outbreaks and emergency response and management of outbreaks.

 

2.  References.

A.  Occupational Safety and Health Act 1970, Public Law 91-596 Section 19, Federal Agency Safety and Health Program.

B.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  29 CFR 1960, Basic Program Elements for Federal Employees, Occupational Safety and Health Programs.

D.  U.S. Department of the Interior Occupational Medicine Program Handbook, latest revision.

E.  Guidelines for Handling Birds to Prevent Spread of West Nile Virus, USGS National Wildlife Health Center.

F.  Department of Interior, Memorandum, and Subject: Updated Employee Health and Safety Guidance for Avian Influenza Surveillance and Control Activities in Wild Bird Populations, 2014, dated July 17, 2014.

G.  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Insect Repellents: Reducing Insect Bites http://www2.epa.gov/insect-repellents.

H. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Vector-Borne Diseases .

I.  CDC, “Diseases That Can Be Spread from Pets to People” http://www.cdc.gov/healthypets/diseases/index.html.

 

3. General Requirements.

A.  Employees working in the field shall be protected from zoonotic (direct animal to human) and vector-borne diseases (transferred for example by ticks and mosquitos) by employing safe work and hygienic practices, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and receipt of immunizations, as appropriate.  Field employees shall also have training to reduce exposures, inclusive of prevention measures detailed in Appendix 24.A, Recommended Practices for Preventing Infectious Diseases in Field Work, SM 445-3-H Safety and Health for Field Operations, and on the CDC Web sites in 2.H and 2.I above.

B.  Work Practices.  Work practices shall include, but are not limited to:

(1)  Use proper wildlife handling practices; rodent, wildlife, and pest control practices in field housing and other occupancies.

(2)  Use EPA-registered insect repellent such as those containing N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), pyrethrin, or picaridin to repel ticks, mosquitoes, and other biting insects. (Click here for the EPA-registered insect repellent tool.)

(3)  Cover exposed skin to prevent insect bites and stings.  Tuck pant legs into boots or socks and sleeves into gloves and wear hats. Use of permethrin treated clothing and tick gaiters is recommended.

(4)  Perform daily check on oneself for the presence of ticks. Remove attached ticks as soon as possible.

(5)  Proper cleanup of rodent, bat, and bird droppings and urine and nesting debris, using wet methods with disinfection. Do not dry sweep or brush to clean. Use a scraper instead.

(6)  Clean and disinfect cages, equipment, and surfaces.

(7)  Discard disposable gloves and protective clothing in an appropriate receptacle. Wash reusable gloves and other protective clothing.

(8)  Avoid creating dust or mists when handling animals or contaminated surfaces and equipment.  Work upwind of dust and, where possible, use water to keep dust levels down.

(9)  Do not open carcasses in the field, where it can be avoided. Instead, perform this task in a facility designed for these procedures.

(10)  Discard sharps such as contaminated needles, syringes, and scalpels into a sharps container.

(11)  Where feasible, use surgical scissors or other manual cutters instead of knives to minimize the risk of cutting oneself.

(12)  Minimize direct contact with wildlife, their secretions, and dander.

(13)  Minimize direct contact with the carcass when bagging it.

(14)  Wash hands with soap and water for 30 seconds immediately after handling wildlife.

(15)  When transporting biological specimens, specimens shall be packaged in primary watertight, leak-proof containers and placed inside a secondary leak-proof container with sufficient absorbent material between containers to absorb spillage from the primary container.

(16)  When transporting known infectious substances (etiological agents) or clinical (diagnostic) specimens by vehicle on public roads or by commercial carrier, packaging, labeling, transporting, or shipping shall comply with Department of Transportation hazardous materials regulations.  Contact the recipient laboratory or the commercial carrier for packaging and shipping instructions prior to collecting the specimens.

(17)  Refrigerators and freezers where biological specimens are stored shall be able to contain leaking fluids from specimens, including when the unit door is opened.

(18)  A spill kit to clean up blood, secretions, excreta, and other biological liquids shall be maintained at facilities where specimens are stored and handled and in vehicles where biological liquids are transported.

C.  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

(1)  In areas presumed or confirmed to be endemic to zoonotic disease, employees shall wear PPE when handling live, dead, or sick wildlife and their biological materials such as tissue, blood, and secretions to protect against splashes and spraying of these materials.  The amount and type of PPE is determined by the amount of potential contact with biological materials, animal dander, feathers, and excretions.  PPE may include goggles and a face shield, impermeable rubber gloves, puncture-resistant gloves, impermeable coveralls, impermeable aprons, hip waders, rain gear, and impermeable boots or boots coverings.

(2)  Wear at least a respirator (either half-face elastomeric respirator with N-95 filter cartridges or a disposable N-95 filtering face piece respirator [dust mask]) when there is a potential for creation of dust or aerosols when handling live, dead, or sick wildlife and their biological materials, and when cleaning up or handling animal bedding and droppings.  See SM 445-2-H.18, Respiratory Protection Program for respirator program requirements.  The type of respiratory protection will depend on the task and the risk of airborne hazard with infectious or contaminated materials to the employee.

D.  Medical Services.

(1)  Immunizations and screening, if available, shall be provided to employees who are at increased risk due to handing wildlife or biological specimens, or are assigned to field work in endemic areas. Refer to Appendix 24.A, Recommended Practices for Preventing Infectious Diseases in Field Work, the U.S. Department of the Interior Occupational Medicine Program Handbook and CDC Web sites in 2.H and 2.I for immunizations recommendations.

(2)  Where available, vaccinations will be made available within 10 days of initial assignment of the employee to duties with potential occupational exposure to vector-born and zoonotic infections.  An employee opting to not receive a vaccination should document the declination using the form contained in Appendix 24.B.

(3)  Employees should seek first aid and medical treatment immediately after an exposure mishap, (e.g., animal scratch, puncture or bite, splashing liquids into eyes or mouth, knife cut, needle stick) and when employees display signs and symptoms of illness.

E.  Labeling.  All containers including refrigerators and freezers in which biological specimens are contained shall be labeled with the biohazard label.

F. Training. Employees who are at an increased risk of exposure or handle biological specimens shall be trained in recognition and prevention of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. Training should include:

(1) Modes of transmission.

(2) Signs and symptoms of illness.

(3) Use of proper clothing and covering exposed skin.

(4) Use of PPE.

(5) Availability of immunizations.

(6) Other preventive measures such as use of proper insect repellent.

(7) Proper containerization, bagging, labeling, and storage of biological specimens.

(8) Proper transport and shipping of biological specimens in accordance with DOT Hazardous Materials shipping requirements.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs prevention of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to local sites to implement zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices.

(2)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for implementing zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices.

(3)  Ensure that regional and local program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official. Assigns authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, to implement zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Assigns program management, administration, and operational program support responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(2)  Ensures that safety staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support national capabilities and regional program needs.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides policy development and guidance for the implementation of zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices and provides technical advice to regions, mission areas, and offices.

(2)  Conducts program evaluations, in accordance with SM 445-2-H.5 Program Evaluations, to assess the implementation of requirements of this chapter within regions, mission areas, and offices.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide region-wide direction and oversight for the administration of zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices, serving as the focal point for development of local procedures and providing technical advice to field Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(2)  Assist CDSPCs as required in establishing and coordinating employee training.

G.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that work practices and PPE are available to and utilized by employees for prevention against zoonotic and vector-borne diseases, and that employees are provided training in recognition and prevention of zoonotic and vector-borne diseases.

(2)  Ensure that immunizations, when available, are provided to employees at risk.

(3)  Report animal handling mishaps, medical diagnoses of zoonotic and vector-borne illnesses, and tick bites in the Safety Management Information System (SMIS) and investigate the SMIS report.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers and supervisors with implementation of zoonotic and vector-borne disease prevention practices and training.

(2)  Provide assistance to managers and supervisors in coordinating immunizations with health care providers.

I.  Employees.

(1)  Participate in all required training programs.

(2)  Seek prompt medical treatment by health care providers if bitten, scratched, or liquids are splashed into eye or mouth, or if experiencing signs or symptoms of illness.

(3)  Report any exposure event (examples include tick bites, animal bites, scratches, or liquid splashes into eye or mouth), or illnesses to the supervisor.

Appendix 24-A: Recommended Practices for Preventing Infectious Diseases in Field Work

Appendix 24-B: Declination of Vaccination Form

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                June 13, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 25

Date: 02/2010

Occupational Industrial Hygiene – Human Bloodborne Pathogens Protection Program

Instruction: This handbook chapter is replaced in order to update Section 2 - References, Section 3 - Scope, and Section 4 - Requirements.

 

1. Purpose. To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements to protect U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel engaged in activities that expose them to human blood or other potentially infectious materials or where exposure is reasonably anticipated.  This chapter does not apply to exposures to animal blood unless exposure is to blood or tissues of experimental animals that are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV).

 

2.  References.

A.  5 CFR 339, Medical Determinations Related to Employability.

B.  5 CFR 630.403, Subpart D, Sick Leave, Supporting Evidence.

C.  29 CFR 1910.1020, Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10027&p_text_version=FALSE

D.  DOI Occupational Medicine Handbook.
http://www.doi.gov/safetynet/information/general/medical/DOI%20Handbook%202009Final.pdf

E.  29 CFR 1910.1030, Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens.
http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10051&p_text_version=FALSE

F.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines for the Management of Occupational Exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and Recommendations for Postexposure Prophylaxis. MMWR 2001;50(No. RR-11)
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5011a1.htm

G.  U.S. Geological Survey Manual SM 445-2-H, Chapter 35 Public Safety and Health. 

 

3.  Scope.

A.  This program shall apply to all USGS employees, volunteers, and cooperators who may come into contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) during the conduct of their duties.  This includes employees who are required to be trained in first aid as part of their duties.

B.  While HBV and HIV are specifically identified in the Bloodborne Pathogen (BBP) standard (29 CFR 1910.1030), the term includes any pathogenic microorganism that is present in human blood or OPIM and can infect and cause disease in persons who are exposed to blood containing the pathogen.  Pathogenic microorganisms can also cause diseases such as hepatitis C, malaria, syphilis, babesiosis, brucellosis, leptospirosis, arboviral infections, relapsing fever, adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (caused by HTLV-I), HTLV-I associated myelopathy, diseases associated with HTLV-II, viral hemorrhagic fever, and West Nile Virus.  Although not a microorganism, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be transmitted through blood.

NOTE: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common chronic bloodborne infection in the United States. (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: Recommendations for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection and HCV-Related Chronic Disease, October 16, 1998/Vol.47/No. RR-19.)

HCV is a viral infection of the liver that is transmitted primarily by exposure to blood.  Currently there is no vaccine effective against HCV.

C.  Examples of possible exposures due to USGS occupations include, but are not limited to, the following employees and situations:

(1)  First Aid Responders.

(a)  Employees who require training in first aid because they work in areas that are more than a few minutes travel from a hospital, clinic, or ambulance service.

(b)  Employees who are part of a facility Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) team.

(2)  Researchers.

(a)  Researchers working with human blood.

(b)  Researchers working with animals. (These researchers may use a modified bloodborne pathogen program as a method to control and minimize exposure.  Training should be modified to include the appropriate risks.)

(3)  Accidental Exposures.

(a)  Employees who are cut, stuck, or otherwise exposed by coming into contact with used syringes from illicit drug use, various types of sharp objects, or trash that may be contaminated with human blood.

(b)  Employees who are exposed when providing assistance as a “Good Samaritan” act.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Each facility that has personnel with potential occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens shall have a written exposure control plan.  A template exposure control plan is found in Appendix 25-4, Sample Exposure Control Plan for USGS Employees with Limited Potential for Exposure to BBP.  An Exposure Control Plan for Members of USGS Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) Teams is found in Appendix 25-5.  This plan may be used by any USGS AED team that provides AED services under the oversight of a medical director.  A more general template for an Exposure Control Plan was developed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).  The exposure control plan shall be reviewed and updated at least annually and whenever necessary to reflect new or modified tasks and procedures that affect occupational exposure and to reflect new or revised employee positions with possible occupational exposure.  The review and update of such plans shall also:

(1)  Reflect changes in technology that eliminate or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens, and

(2)  Document annually consideration and implementation of appropriate commercially available and effective safer medical devices designed to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure.

B.  Universal precautions outlined in 29 CFR 1910.1030(d) shall be implemented to prevent contact with human blood or OPIM.

C.  Biohazard warning labels shall be placed on containers of regulated waste, refrigerators and freezers containing human blood, OPIM, and containers used for storage, transport, or shipment of human blood or OPIM.

D.  Personnel training shall be in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1030(g) (2) and include site-specific information.  Qualified instructors include the American Red Cross.  Retraining is required at least annually and when changes such as modification of tasks or procedures or institution of new tasks or procedures affect the employee's occupational exposure.

E.  Training and medical records shall be maintained as described in 29 CFR 1910.1030(h).

F.  Medical Program/Vaccination.

(1)  The hepatitis B vaccination series shall be made available using organizational funds to personnel determined to have occupation exposure in accordance with 1910.1030(f) (2).  The vaccine will be made available after the training required in 29 CFR 1910.1030 has been accomplished, and within 10 days of initial assignment of the employee to duties with occupational exposure.  USGS realizes that some personnel, even after training, may decline to receive the hepatitis B vaccine.  In such case, the declining employee is to sign the declination statement that is in Appendix A of 29 CFR 1910.1030.  The employee can receive the vaccine after signing the declination statement if a change of mind occurs and if duties still involve those with occupational exposure.

(2)  USGS offers post-exposure evaluation and follow-up after an exposure incident to any employee who suffers an exposure incident while performing duties on the job.  All medical evaluations and procedures are to be made available at no cost to USGS personnel, at a reasonable time and place, and under the other conditions set forth in 29 CFR 1910.1030(f).

In the event of an exposure incident (as defined in 29 CFR 1910.1030), the employee is to immediately wash any skin with soap and water and flush mucous membranes with water when such areas have had contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials.  The employee should then seek medical attention. It must be realized that any exposure incident is an event for which immediate attention must be sought, as the effectiveness of prophylaxis depends on the immediacy of its delivery.  In addition, the employee who has had an exposure incident is to report such incident to his or her supervisor as soon as possible.  The supervisor will inform the local Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC) who will contact the facility where the exposure incident occurred.  The CDSPC will work together with the supervisor to ascertain the source individual's identity, arrange for testing of the source individual, and communicate with the physician evaluating the USGS employee. Assistance may be obtained from the Bureau safety staff.  Additionally, the exposure incident shall be documented using the format in Appendix 25-2, Exposure Incident Record for Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure. Healthcare providers evaluating the exposure incident shall be given the form in Appendix 25-3, Health Care Provider Report of Post-Exposure Evaluation to fill out.

G.  Special Issues.

(1)  First Aid Responders.

(a)  Employees whose primary job is unrelated to rendering of first aid or medical assistance but who may perform these functions as a collateral duty in an emergency are considered to have occupational exposure and are covered by all provisions of the standard.

(b)  A facility may choose to defer vaccinating designated first aid responders until after their involvement in a first aid incident.  If this policy is chosen, the following conditions (i-v) will be met:

(i)  Reporting procedures shall be instituted to ensure that all first aid incidents involving the presence of human blood or OPIM are reported before the end of the work shift during which the first aid incident occurred.  This report will include the names of all first aid responders who rendered assistance, regardless of whether personal protective equipment was used and must describe the first aid incident, and the time and date of the incident.  The description must include a determination of whether or not, in addition to the presence of blood or other potentially infectious materials, an "exposure incident," as defined by the standard, occurred.  This determination is necessary in order to ensure that the proper post-exposure evaluation, prophylaxis, and follow-up procedures required by paragraph 29 CFR 1910.1030(f)(3) are made available immediately, whenever there has been an "exposure incident" as defined by the standard. (See H of this section.)(Appendix 25-2, Exposure Incident Record for Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure).

(ii)  The training program will include the specifics of this reporting procedure for first aid responders.

(iii)  A report will be maintained that lists all such first aid incidents.  This report will be readily available, upon request, to all employees and to OSHA Compliance Officers.  Records in the Safety Management Information System (SMIS) meet this requirement.

(iv)  The full hepatitis B vaccination series will be made available within 24 hours, to all unvaccinated first aid responders who have rendered assistance in any situation involving the presence of human blood or OPIM regardless of whether or not a specific exposure incident occurred.

(v)  In addition to the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1030(d)(3), personal protective equipment for emergency medical providers shall include:

  • disposable non-latex (e.g. vinyl or nitrile) gloves in a variety of sizes,
  • face shields or masks and eye protection,
  • gowns if there is the potential for splashes of body fluids, and
  • resuscitation equipment such as pocket mouth-to-mouth resuscitation masks.

H. Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-up.

Following a report of an exposure incident, the supervisor shall make immediately available to the exposed employee a confidential medical evaluation and follow-up, including at least the following elements:

(1) Document the route of exposure and the circumstances under which the exposure incident occurred

(2) Identify and document of the source individual, unless the supervisor can establish that identification is infeasible or prohibited by state or local law

(3) When the source individual is already known to be infected with HBV or HIV, testing for the source individual's known HBV or HIV status need not be repeated.

(4) Results of the source individual's testing will be made available to the exposed employee, and the employee shall be informed of applicable laws and regulations concerning disclosure of the identity and infectious status of the source individual.

(5) The exposed employee's blood will be collected as soon as feasible and tested after consent is obtained.

(6) If the employee consents to baseline blood collection, but does not give consent at that time for HIV serologic testing, the sample will be preserved for at least 90 days. If, within 90 days of the exposure incident, the employee elects to have the baseline sample tested, such testing will be done as soon as feasible.

(7) The employee will be provided with post-exposure prophylaxis, when medically indicated, as recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service; counseling; and will have reported illnesses evaluated.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager/Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Provides Bureau-wide oversight and direction for the BBP program.

(2)  Conducts reviews and evaluates the effectiveness of USGS, Regional Headquarters and BBP programs, as feasible and modifies policy and procedures as applicable.

(3)  Provides assistance to Regional Safety Managers in development of BBP programs.

B. Regional Safety Manager.

(1) Provides region-wide direction and oversight for the administration of an appropriate BPP, serving as the focal point for program development and implementation and provides technical advice to Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(2)  Evaluates effectiveness of Regional Headquarters and science program BBP programs and makes recommendations for improvement as part of the overall safety evaluation program.

C. Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Oversee the administration of an appropriate BBP programs for regional science program field locations.

(2)  Serve as the focal point for the implementation of the regional science BBP programs and provide technical advice to field level CDSPC’s and management.

(3)  Provide assistance to regional science program field location organizational managers and CDSPC’s in development of BBP programs.

(4)  Evaluate effectiveness of regional science program field-level BBP programs and make recommendations for improvement as part of the overall safety evaluation program.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist organizational management and supervisors in implementation of the BBP program and training and education component.

(2)  Assist supervisors in identifying personnel with potential for occupational exposure to BBP and help conduct or coordinate appropriate training programs.

(3)  Assist in local development of standard operating procedures (SOP’s) and in maintaining required BBP program documentation.

E.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Coordinate personnel training and education on the BBP program by qualified instructors.

(2)  Upon request, arrange for access to personnel medical records for employees' own records and to others with written consent of the employee in accordance with 29 CFR1910.1020.

(3)  Determine which personnel have occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and ensure that these employees receive required annual training and that training is properly documented. USGS personnel who are responsible for rendering first aid or medical assistance will be considered to have possible occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens and will be covered under 29 CFR 1910.1030 and this chapter.

(4)  Provide access for employees to vaccination and medical evaluation as required and maintain records as part of the employees’ permanent records.

(5)  Develop SOPs for operations where potential BBP incidents could occur covering appropriate decontamination and disposal procedures, personal protective equipment, engineering controls, and appropriate work practices.

(6)  Establish and maintain an effective organizational BBP program.

(7)  Review and update the exposure control plan at least annually and whenever necessary to reflect new or modified tasks and procedures that affect occupational exposure and to reflect new or revised employee positions with occupational exposure.

F.  Employees.

(1)  Participate in all required training programs.

(2)  Read and be familiar with the facility’s Exposure Control Plan and SOP’s related to BBP.

(3)  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment and observe appropriate work practice controls, including universal precautions.

(4)  Sign a consent or declination form for the hepatitis B vaccine (see Appendix 25-1, Hepatitis B Vaccination Information and Consent/Declination Form).

(5)  Report all first aid incidents involving the presence of blood or OPIM to the Supervisor or Manager before the end of the work shift during which the incident occurred.

 

6.  Additional Resources.

A.  OSHA Safety and Health Topics, http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/index.html

B.  USGS Bloodborne Pathogen On-Line Training Program via DOI LEARN.

C.  CalOSHA Exposure Control Plan for Bloodborne Pathogens, http://www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/dosh_publications/expplan2.pdf

D.  Hepatitis Network, http://www.hepnet.com/

 

7.  Definitions.

A.  AED - Automatic External Defibulater

B.  BBP - Bloodborne Pathogens - pathogenic microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans.  These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

C.  CDC - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

D.  CDSPC - Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator.

E.  CFR – Code of Federal Regulations.

F.  HBV - hepatitis B virus.

G.  HCV - hepatitis C virus.

H.  HIV - human immunodeficiency virus.

I.  OPIM - Other Potentially Infectious Materials.

J.  OSHA - Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

K.  OPIM - Other Potentially Infectious Materials - (1) The following human body fluids: semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated with blood, and all body fluids in situations where it is difficult or impossible to differentiate between body fluids; (2) Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or dead); and (3) HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

L.  SMIS - Safety Management Information System

M.  Universal Precautions - an approach to infection control. According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens.

N.  USGS - United States Geological Survey

Appendix 25-1: Hepatitis B Vaccination Information and Consent/Declination Forms

 

Appendix 25-2: Exposure Incident Record for Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure

Appendix 25-3: Health Care Provider Report of Postexposure Evaluation

 

Appendix 25-4: Sample Exposure Control Plan for USGS Employees with Limited Potential for Exposure to BBPs

 

Appendix 25-5: Exposure Control Plan for Members of USGS Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) Teams

 

 

Approved:
_________________________________
Karen Baker for Carol F. Aten
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official 

 

 

CHAPTER 26

Personal Protective Equipment

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to update organizational changes and references.  The appendix and requirement for a written personal protective equipment plan were removed.  The section on penalties for failure to observe safety practices was removed and is located in Survey Manual 445.1.  The requirement for written hazard assessments is clarified in this chapter.

 

1.  Purpose.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for the hazard assessment and the selection, usage, and maintenance of personal protective equipment (PPE) necessary to perform assigned tasks.

B. Applies to all Bureau activities and operations as well as its employees, volunteers, contractors, and visitors.

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1910 Subpart I Personal Protective Equipment (General Industry), including Appendix B Non-mandatory Compliance Guidelines for Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment Selection.

B.  29 CFR 1915 Subpart I Personal Protective Equipment (Shipyard Employment).

C.  29 CFR 1917 Subpart E Personal Protection (Marine Terminals).

D.  29 CFR 1926 Subpart E Personal Protective Equipment and Life Saving Equipment (Construction).

E.  5 U.S.C. 7903 Protective Clothing and Equipment.

F.  351 Department Manual (DM) 1 Paragraph 1.7B. 

G.  Department of the Interior Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) Handbook.

H.  Acquisition of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Visual Identity System Clothing, Merchandise, and Other Items.

I.  Survey Manual (SM) 445-2-H Chapter 15 Job Hazard Analyses. 

J.  SM 445-2-H Chapter 18 Respiratory Protection Program.

K.  SM 445-2-H Chapter 19 Hearing Conservation Program.

L.  SM 445-2-H Chapter 28 Underwater Diving Safety.

M.  SM 445-2-H Chapter 31 Watercraft Safety.

N.  SM 408.3 - Identification Clothing.

 

3.  Definitions.

Personal Protective Equipment.  The term must include, but is not limited to, devices designed to be worn by personnel for eye, face, head, respiratory, hand, arm, body, leg, foot, and fall protection.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Hazard assessment and equipment selection.

(1)  Jobs, sites, projects, and activities must be assessed for hazards that are present, or likely to be present, which necessitate the use of PPE.

(2)  Based on the hazard assessment, select controls to reduce or eliminate the hazards.

(a)  Engineering and work practice controls must be the primary means used to reduce employee exposure to hazards.

(b)  Administrative or work practice controls may be appropriate in some cases before engineering controls are implemented or where engineering controls cannot be implemented.

(c)  When the above controls cannot be implemented or are insufficient, PPE must be selected, and affected employees must use the selected types of PPE that will protect them from the hazards identified in the hazard assessment.  See SM 445-2-H.15 and Appendix B of 29 CFR 1910 Subpart I for hazard assessment guidance.

(3)  Each affected employee must be informed of the PPE selections required for job, site, project, or activity.  The PPE must be readily available when needed.

(4)  Selected PPE must properly fit each affected employee.

B.  Defective or damaged PPE.  Defective or damaged PPE must not be used.  Defective or damaged PPE must be disposed immediately and replaced.

C.  Training.

(1)  Employees who are required to wear PPE must be trained to be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following:

(a)  When PPE is necessary.

(b)  The type of PPE necessary.

(c)  How to properly put on, take off, adjust, and wear PPE.

(d)  The limitations of the PPE.

(e)  The proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of the PPE.

(2)  Retraining is required when an employee does not appear to have the understanding and skill needed, or job tasks/PPE changes rendering previous training obsolete.

D.  Payment for protective equipment.

(1)  Required PPE must be provided at no cost to employees and volunteers.  Contractors are responsible for procuring and providing PPE to contractor personnel.

(2)  This authority does not extend to clothing the employee would also purchase for personal-use.  See Acquisition of USGS Visual Identity System Clothing, Merchandise, and Other Items for more details.  Examples include: hats, gloves, bathing suits, coats, or umbrellas, unless:

(a)  The clothing is required to have special safety features not found in personal clothing.

(b)  The clothing is required for weather conditions more severe than encountered at the employee's duty station such as a winter parka for work in the Arctic.

(3)  Generally, the USGS may not purchase rain gear.  However, the mission may require employees to conduct field work during inclement weather in locations requiring high visibility apparel, such as on bridges or on roadside rights of way.  For such conditions, rain gear that meets color and reflective material requirements of relevant regulations may be stocked and issued as needed.

(4)  Supervisors and management may approve additional PPE provided it meets 26.4.D.(2)(a) and (b) or has been determined necessary by a site-specific job hazard analysis (JHA).  If a “personal needs” item is deemed necessary safety clothing, the purchase must be justified in a JHA with concurrence from the Regional Safety Manager or Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch safety manager with final approval by the Regional Director or Associate Director.

E.  Employee-owned equipment.  Where employees provide their own PPE, the supervisor is responsible for assuring its adequacy, proper maintenance, and sanitation.

F.  Eye and face protection.

(1)  Employees must wear appropriate eye or face protection when exposed to any hazards (e.g., flying particles, molten metal, liquid chemicals, acids or caustic liquids, chemical gases or vapors, or potentially injurious light radiation).

(2)  Contact lenses must not be worn in environments where there are chemicals, fumes, smoke, dusts, particles, or molten metals.  Contact lenses are not a substitute for approved eye protection and in some instances may increase the hazard to the eyes.  

(3)  Caution signs must be posted in order to designate eye hazard areas.  These signs must specify the type of eye protection to be worn before entering the area.

(4)  Prescription safety glasses must be purchased for employees who wear corrective lenses and are exposed to eye hazards on a continuing basis.  Eye protection that can be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing their proper position may be used by employees with only occasional exposure.

(5)  Goggles must be worn to protect eyes from splashes of strong acids, bases, and other chemicals that may cause eye injury.

(6)  When a face shield or welding helmet is worn, it must be worn over the primary eye protection (e.g., safety glasses with side shields or goggles).

(7)  Additional eye and face protection requirements are described in 29 CFR 1910.13329 CFR 1915.15329 CFR 1917.9129 CFR 1926.102, and Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) Handbook.

G.  Head protection.  

(1)  Employees must wear appropriate protective helmets when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects.

(2)  Employees must wear appropriate protective helmets designed to reduce electrical shock hazards when near exposed electrical conductors which could contact the head.

(3)  Employees must wear appropriate protective helmets when working in areas where they may bump their heads against fixed objects (e.g., exposed pipes or beams).

(4)  A class of protective headgear on the market called a “bump cap” is designed for use in areas with low head clearance.  Bump caps may be used where protection is needed from head bumps and lacerations.  These are not designed to protect against falling or flying objects and do not meet American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or Office of Aviation Services (OAS) requirements.  Bump caps must not be used when head protection meeting ANSI or OAS requirements are required.

(5)  Additional head protection requirements are described in 29 CFR 1910.13529 CFR 1915.15529 CFR 1917.9329 CFR 1926.100, and Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) Handbook.

H.  Hand protection.

(1)  Employees must wear appropriate hand protection when their hands are exposed to hazards (e.g., skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes).

(2)  Additional hand protection requirements are described in 29 CFR 1910.13829 CFR 1915.157, and Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) Handbook.

I.  Foot protection.

(1)  Employees must wear appropriate protective footwear when working in areas where there is a danger of foot injuries due to falling or rolling objects, objects piercing the sole, working with or near heavy material or equipment, or from an electrical static-discharge or shock hazard.  Work boots consisting of a steel or composite toe and that cover the ankle may be appropriate for many field tasks. 

(2)  Open-toed shoes and sandals must not be worn in laboratories or when handling/working with corrosives.

(3)  Additional foot protection requirements are described in 29 CFR 1910.13629 CFR 1915.15629 CFR 1917.9429 CFR 1926.96, and Aviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) Handbook.

J.  Electrical protective equipment.

(1)  Employees must use appropriate electrical protective equipment (e.g., insulating gloves, protectors, and/or insulating sleeves) when working on or near an exposed, uninsulated energized electrical lines or parts.

(2)  Insulating equipment must be inspected for damage (including an air test for insulating gloves) before each day's use and immediately following any incident that can reasonably be suspected of causing damage.  Refer to ASTM F1236-96 (2012), Standard Guide for Visual Inspection of Electrical Protective Rubber Products.

(3)  Electrical protective equipment must be tested periodically at the voltages and the maximum intervals as per Table I-4 and Table I-5 in 29 CFR 1910.137 (e.g., rubber insulating gloves must be tested before first issue and every 6 months thereafter).  A certification must be prepared that identifies the electrical equipment test results and the test date. 

(4)  Additional electrical protective equipment requirements are described in 29 CFR 1910.137 and 29 CFR 1926.97.
K.  Additional protective equipment or clothing.

(1)  Employees must wear additional appropriate protective equipment or clothing as determined by a hazard assessment (e.g., personal floatation devices, personal fall arrest systems, aprons, coveralls, full body suits, chaps, leggings, ice or snow traction devices for footwear, flame retardant clothing, puncture resistant clothing).

(2)  Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs) are required in all operations near, on, in, or over water except where an approved site specific JHA identifies an increased level of hazard due to the use of a PFD and an exemption has been approved by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager. 

(a)  PFDs worn by employees must be U.S. Coast Guard approved Type III or Type V PFDs and be either international orange in color and equipped with retro-reflective tape as per 46 CFR 25.25-15 and 46 CFR 164.018 or meet the current ANSI 107 standard of yellow-green with the required retro-reflective material configuration.

(b)  Inflatable PFDs must not be worn when working in high flow/high risk flood conditions.  The air bladder may be compromised by striking objects in the water. 

(c)  Inflatable PFDs are not approved for children less than 16 years of age and are not recommended for use by non-swimmers.

(3)  High-visibility apparel meeting the current ANSI 107 standard must be worn by employees for:

(a)  Class 2 or Class 3 when working on or near roadways in daylight and good visibility.

(b)  Class 3 when working on or near roadways at night or during times of low visibility (e.g., rain, snow, or fog). 

(c)  Class 3 when working on bridges.  The employee must also wear a personal floatation device.  

(i)  When a Class 2 inflatable PFD is worn over a Class 3 traffic vest, the combination meets Class 3 standard.

(ii)  A float coat that meets the Class 3 standard does not require an additional traffic vest.

(iii)  Positive floatation PFDs and PPE that do not meet the Class 3 standard may not be used as high visibility PPE when working from highway bridges unless a traffic garment meeting the Class 3 standard is worn over the PFD.  Alternatively, Class E trousers, bib overalls, or shorts may be worn in combination with a Class 2 PFD/coat/vest which then meets the Class 3 standard.

(d)  In addition, comply with state and local regulations which may be more stringent (e.g., some states require Class 3 garments to be worn by employees working on or near roadways at any time, in any weather conditions).

(4)  Additional protective equipment requirements are described in 29 CFR 1915.15829 CFR 1915.15929 CFR 1917.9529 CFR 1926.10629 CFR 1926 Subpart MAviation Life Support Equipment (ALSE) HandbookSM 445-2-H.31, and SM 445-3-H.2.

L.  PPE with USGS identifier or logo.  If PPE is intended to carry a USGS identifier or logo, it must meet the requirements of SM 408.3 - Identification Clothing.  Refer to the Acquisition of USGS Visual Identity System Clothing, Merchandise, and Other Items webpage when acquiring PPE with a USGS identifier or logo.

M.  Respiratory protection is addressed in SM 445-2-H.18. 

N.  Hearing protection is addressed in SM 445-2-H.19.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs the PPE program requirements through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official. 

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that respective region, mission area, or office implements and complies with PPE program requirements.

(2)  Provide staff and funding support to ensure that PPE program requirements are implemented and findings are abated.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official/Associate Director for Administration.

(1) Exercises the authority of the Director to develop, direct, and manage an effective PPE program.

(2)  Assigns PPE program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Assigns PPE responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of PPE program requirements.

(2)  Ensures the development of PPE policy.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance in implementing PPE program requirements to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of PPE program requirements.

(2)  Conduct inspections and external audits of PPE program requirements.  Ensure findings are tracked and abated in the Inspection and Abatement System.

(3)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) in implementing and complying with PPE program requirements.

G.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to ensure PPE program requirements are implemented.

(2)  Ensure that PPE owned by USGS or by the employee is adequate for the job task(s) and employees are trained as per this chapter.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Assist managers and supervisors in the implementation of PPE program requirements.

I.  Employees. 

(1)  Complete applicable PPE training.

(2)  Wear PPE that is required by the applicable hazard assessment.

(3)  Maintain personally issued PPE.

(4)  Report to their supervisors or CDSPCs any concerns regarding PPE.

Appendix 26-1: Suggested Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Operations/Tasks

 

 

Katie McCulloch for /s/Jose R. Aragon                                     4/20/2017
_________________________________                                                                              
Jose R. Aragon                                                                        Date
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 27

Aviation Safety

Instruction: Changes to this chapter were made to reflect Department of the Interior (DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organizational changes and policy.

1.  Purpose. To specify the minimum aviation safety program requirements that protects personnel from accidental injury and/or illness and minimizes property damage.

2.  Scope.

A.  Applies to USGS employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperators, who are involved in aviation activities and flight services other than airline travel (those acquired on a seat-fare basis from air carriers) per 350 Departmental Manual (DM)1.1.

B.  Applies to all aircraft operated by, or under the operational control of the USGS. Included are those aircraft contracted, leased, or operated under the provisions of an Aircraft Rental Agreement, as well as aircraft owned by DOI or USGS personnel when operated on official business.

C.  Persons employed by or whose work is directed solely by cooperators or contractors (End Product Contracts) are exempt from provisions of these documents except when their duties include use of flight services which are under operational control of the USGS or present a serious safety hazard to USGS personnel or property.

D.  Parts 350–354 of the DM do not apply to international DOI operations (except for Fleet operations).  USGS employees are expected to follow DOI and USGS aviation policies to the extent practical when working overseas per 350 DM 1.2 C., and in the National Aviation Management Plan (NAMP).

E.  The definitions used in this chapter are in the NAMP and 350 DM 1 Appendix 2. These definitions are in addition to those found in 14 CFR 1.1. Abbreviations are listed in the NAMP, 350 DM 1 Appendix 1 and in 14 CFR 1.2.

F.  Provides minimal guidance for use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS, e.g. drones or unmanned aircraft) operated by the USGS.

G. Provides minimal notification and marking requirements for obstructions to air navigation (e.g., cableways and/or antennas) with FAA regulations (14 CFR part 77 and 101).

 

3.  References.

A.  14 CFR Parts 1–199. Federal Aviation Regulations.

B.  Federal Property Management Regulation Part 101, Subchapter G, Aviation Transportation, and Motor Vehicles.

C.  485 Department Manual. Safety and Occupational Health Program.

D.  Department Manual, Parts 350–354 establish management responsibilities, policies and procedures for the utilization and operation of aircraft within the DOI. The provisions set forth in the individual chapters of each part are applicable to USGS organizations that use or operate aircraft.

E.  Departmental Manual 112 DM 12485 DM 1 and Parts 350–354 govern USGS air crewmembers and passengers on-board aircraft under its operational control.

F.  DOI Office of Aviation Services (OAS) Operational Procedures Memorandums (OPM), Handbooks, and Information Bulletins.

G.  DOI Operational Procedures Memorandum No. 11 DOI Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).

H.  USGS Volunteer for Science Handbook 500-23-H.

I.  USGS SM 308.66. Specialized Safety Program Committees.

J.  USGS NAMP provides comprehensive guidance for aviation management and operations.

K.  USGS Aviation Fact Sheet provides pertinent guidance for most aviation users in a condensed form.

L.  USGS Aviation Safety website provides comprehensive information for aviation users.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  FAA and DOI Requirements. The USGS shall ensure that its aviation policy is consistent with FAA requirements specified in 14 CFR 1-199, and policy directives are consistent with the provisions of 350-354 DM series, DOI Aviation Handbooks, and OAS Memoranda.

(1)  USGS Aviation Safety Policy. USGS aviation safety policy shall be consistent with Handbooks and Part 352 Aviation Safety:

Chapter 1  Aviation Safety Program

Chapter 2  Aviation Program Evaluations

Chapter 3  Aircraft Mishap Notification, Investigation, and Reporting

Chapter 4  Aviation Safety Awards Program

(2)  USGS Flight Operations. USGS flight operations shall be conducted in accordance with Handbooks, OPMs, and Part 351 Aviation Operations:

Chapter 1  Flight Operations Standards and Procedures

Chapter 2  Aircraft Equipment and Maintenance

Chapter 3  Flight Crewmember Policy

Chapter 4  Cooperator Operations

(3)  Procurement.  With the exceptions listed in 353 DM 1.2(A), all official flight services must be procured through OAS Acquisitions Services Directorate. Part 353 Aviation Services:

Chapter 1  Aircraft Contracting

Chapter 2  Aircraft Acquisition and Disposition

B.  USGS Aviation Safety Programs.  Each cost center involved in aviation operations shall establish an aviation safety program, consistent with the provisions of 350-354 DM series, DOI aviation Handbooks, and OAS Memoranda, the USGS NAMP, and this Chapter.

(1)  Safety.  The safety of USGS employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperators takes precedence over mission accomplishment.  Pilots shall not be coerced to operate in weather, location, low altitude, confined space, wire environment, or other circumstance that may be beyond the known capabilities of the pilot or the aircraft.

(2)  Employee Prerogative.  USGS employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperators may elect without fear of reprisal not to fly under any condition they consider to be unsafe based on a risk assessment/hazard analysis that completion cannot be accomplished safely.  These situations shall be reported as soon as possible to the Project Chief, line supervisor, and, when warranted, to the OAS.

(3)  Private Life Insurance Exclusionary Clauses.  Many private life insurance policies contain exclusionary clauses for high hazard activities, e.g. diving, skydiving, and participation as pilots, aircrew members, or passengers on non-commercial flights.  Identification of any exclusionary clauses is the responsibility of the employee.

(4)  Research Work Orders/Cooperative Agreements/Support Services Contracts/Grants, etc.  Subject agreements that involve the use of flight services must contain language that all persons on board aircraft under the operational control of USGS are subject to the directives in this Handbook.

(5)  National Aviation Program.  The USGS shall establish and maintain an active national aviation program for the management of aviation resources and the implementation of an effective aircraft mishap prevention program in accordance with 352 DM 1.3.

(a)  Aviation Advisory Committee.  The program shall include provisions for the establishment of Aviation Advisory Committee (AAC).  The AAC meets or exceeds the requirements in 14 CFR 1-199DM 350-354, and OAS Memoranda and Handbooks.

(b)  Aviation Safety Program Staffing and Training.  The USGS shall provide staffing and training of employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperators necessary to ensure effective aircraft mishap prevention program in accordance with 352 DM 1.5.

C.  Training.  Minimum training requirements are outlined in the USGS NAMP section 5, the DOI Interagency Aviation Training Guide, and OAS Memoranda.  Resources shall be made available for education and training. Attendance at aviation training sessions, as well as aviation safety seminars and formal educational institutions, shall be encouraged.

(1)  Aircrew members.  USGS employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperatives flying special-use missions are classified as “aircrew members” and require Basic Aviation Safety training every 3 years supplemented by mission appropriate specialized training mandated by DOI.

(2)  Supervisors and Project/Task Chiefs. Supervisors and Project or Task Chiefs must take Aviation Management Training for Supervisors every 3 years and training mandated by DOI.  A Project or Task Chief is a person who may supervise the activities of an Aircrew member.  A supervisor is the official first line supervisor of an Aircrew member.

(3)  Managers.  Managers must complete Aviation Management Training for Supervisors or receive an Aviation Management Line Managers Briefing every 3 years.

(4)  Passengers.  Passengers on point-to-point and non-special use flights must receive a safety briefing by the flight crew/pilot.  A passenger is any person aboard an aircraft who does not perform the function of a flight crew/pilot or aircrew member.

D.  National Aviation Management Plan(NAMP).  The NAMP addresses the minimum elements listed in 352 DM 1.9, OAS Memoranda, and Handbooks.  The Bureau National Aviation Manager will review the NAMP annually and make interim revisions as required.

E.  Center, Unit, or Office Aviation Management Plan (CAMP).  Each cost center involved in aviation operations shall establish a CAMP, consistent with the provisions of 350-354 DM series, DOI aviation Handbooks, and OAS Memoranda and this Chapter SM-445-2-H. A template for a CAMP is provided in the NAMP Appendix 2.

F.  Project Aviation Safety Plan (PASP).  Each project shall develop a PASP consistent with 352 DM 1.9 C., applicable OPMs, Handbooks, and the USGS NAMP. Minimum PASP requirements are provided in the template in the NAMP Appendix 1.

(1) Toe-in, Single-Skid, and Step-Out Landings.  These landings are prohibited except when an exception to DOI policy has been approved by the OAS Director, per OPM-40 Approval for Single-Skid, Toe-in, and Hover Exit/Entry.

(2)  Aerial Capture, Eradication, and Tagging of Animals (ACETA). Capturing of animals must be conducted in accordance with 351 DM 2 and 351 DM 3 and the USGS NAMP and the DOI ACETA Handbook.

(3)  Flights Over Public Lands.  Notifications to land management agencies shall be made for flights over public lands, keep aircraft noise and pollution to a minimum, and comply with applicable wildlife statutes.

(4)  PPE Waivers.  Waivers or exceptions to PPE requirements may be granted, per the Aviation Life Support Equipment Handbook. Requests for exceptions must be addressed to the OAS Director from the Bureau Aviation Manager and must contain detailed justification that the waiver is essential in the accomplishment of specific Bureau projects.  Copies of Bureau-granted waivers must be provided to the OAS Director and be included with Bureau requests for procurement services when such operations are to be conducted, per 350 DM 1.9.  Current waiver can be found at the USGS Aviation Safety website.

G.  Aviation Mishap Response Plan (AMRP).  Each Cost Center using flight services must maintain a current and complete AMRP detailing necessary action in the event of a missing or downed aircraft according to 352 DM 3.5 and the NAMP.  The Interagency Aviation Mishap Response Guide and Checklist provides an approved AMRP template.

H.  End-Product Contracts.  End Product contracts to obtain products such as aerial photographs, per head animal capture, LiDAR imagery, survey data or maps, airborne geophysical survey data, or aerial wildlife survey data are encouraged. End Product contracts are not flight service contracts and do not need to be obtained through OAS (353 DM 1.2(A)).  However, end product contracts must include only specifications for the data or products and shall not specify pilot or aircraft standards, the use of PPE, direct aircraft maintenance, dispatch or direct flights, manage flight operations, use public (government) aircraft, or allow any DOI personnel on board.

I.  Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) (e.g. drones or unmanned aircraft). UAS operations must be conducted in accordance with DOI UAS policy.

J.  Aviation Program Evaluation.  Aviation Program Evaluations shall be conducted in accordance with 352 DM 2. Evaluation findings will also be entered into the DOI Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

K.  Aircraft Mishap Notification, Investigation, and Reporting. Aircraft mishap notification, investigations, and reporting shall be accomplished in accordance with 352 DM 6 “Aircraft Mishap Notification, Investigation, & Reporting”.

(1)  Safety Management Information System (SMIS) reporting. Additional aircraft mishap reporting requirements are prescribed in 451 DM 1 and 485 DM 7.

(2)  DOI Mishap Investigation Responsibilities. The OAS Director has the responsibility and authority to conduct DOI aircraft mishap investigations.  The OAS Aviation Safety Manager will coordinate all DOI investigations with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and will serve as the DOI point of contact for NTSB aircraft mishap investigations.

(3)  Bureau Mishap Investigation Responsibilities.  The USGS shall designate an on-site liaison to coordinate with the DOI Serious Accident Investigation Team. Additional USGS (bureau) requirements are listed in 445-2-H Chapter 7.

L.  Aviation Safety Awards Program. Aviation Safety Awards requirements are detailed within 352 DM 4.

M.  Cooperator Aircraft. Military, other Public Agency or Private Entity Aircraft and pilots must meet DOI standards for general or special-use flights.  Requests for use of cooperator aircraft must be coordinated with the Bureau Aviation Manager prior to the planned flight and provide the information in 351 DM 4.

N.  Passenger Travel on Government Aircraft. Travel (point-to-point, no duties while onboard) on Government aircraft (contracted or fleet) is restricted to official travel or travel on a space-basis subject to the policies and definitions prescribed in 41 CFR Part 101-37, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Circular A-126; and DOI Operational Procedures Memorandum: Improving the Management and Use of Government Aircraft.

(1)  Senior Executive Travel on Government Aircraft.  Prior approval on a trip-by-trip basis from the DOI Solicitor or designee is required for Senior Executives, their family members, and non-Federal travelers for travel that is non-mission or non-required. OMB Circular A-126 and OAS Memoranda.

(2)  Privately Owned Aircraft.  A USGS employee may use privately owned aircraft for official travel and receive reimbursement, upon supervisor approval, provided the employee holds FAA issued Pilot and Medical Certificates and is properly authorized to exercise the privileges of those certificates.  Transportation of passengers on a privately owned aircraft is prohibited unless the aircraft and pilot are properly carded (OAS approved) for DOI operations.

O.  Aircraft Usage Reporting Requirements. USGS employees, contractors, volunteers and cooperators shall report flight hours according to 350 DM 1.9, per 41 CFR 101-37.407.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director. Directs Aviation Safety activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO).

B.  Deputy Director. Serves as the USGS representative on the DOI Executive Aviation Board.

C.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)   Appoint a Regional Aviation Manager (RAM) within the regional area as a representative on the Bureau Aviation Advisory Committee. Regional Aviation Manager(s) may support more than one region.

(2)  Ensure that respective region, mission area, or office implements and complies with aviation program requirements.

(3)  Provide staff and funding support to ensure that aviation program requirements are implemented and findings are abated.

D.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO).  The DASHO serves as the USGS senior management official on the DOI Executive Aviation Committee, and has delegated this authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to develop, direct, and manage an effective aviation program.

(2)  Assigns authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for aviation program management and administration.

(3)  Designates a Bureau Aviation Manager.

(4)  Assigns a representative to serve as liaison with OAS for all NTSB reportable mishaps.

(5)  Ensures USGS participation on Interior Aircraft Mishap Review Boards.

E.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Serves as the USGS senior management official on the DOI Executive Aviation Committee.

(2)  Assigns aviation program responsibilities to the Bureau Aviation Manager for program management and administration.

F.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the aviation program.

(2)  Ensures the development of the aviation policy.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance in implementing aviation program requirements to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

G.  Bureau Aviation Manager (BAM).

(1)  Manages the overall aviation safety program and serves as principal advisor on all technical and administrative aviation safety matters, inclusive of the following: Aviation Safety Program Responsibilities, Aircraft Mishap Prevention Program, Aviation Review Program, Aviation Safety Awards Program, Aircraft Mishap Investigation, and Aviation Safety Education and Training.

(2)  Coordinates with OAS on aviation program support inclusive of aviation program evaluations.

(3)  Performs as the principal representative for accident investigations and review boards.

(4)  Analyzes accident and incident trends and monitors AMIS Safety Communiqué (SAFECOM) reports and incidental serious safety concerns.

(5)  Serves as USGS representative to the EAS who reports to the EAC.

(6)  Disseminates aviation related policy and technical information.

(7)  Coordinates fleet aircraft acquisition, replacement, and disposal to support agency programs.

(8)  Tracks and reviews budget submissions and aviation expenditures.

(9)  Assists OAS with the coordination of DOI Aviation Program Evaluations.

(10)  Publishes the NAMP.

(11)  Monitors airspace needs and coordinates with the FAA as appropriate.

(12)  Identifies and provides appropriate resources for the education and training of RAMs.

(13)  Promotes aviation safety management education and training courses, workshops, and seminars.

(14)  Provides oversight for the USGS aviation safety awards program.

(15)  Maintains liaison with the OAS Aviation Safety Manager for aircraft mishap prevention purposes.

(16)  Conducts Aviation Safety Evaluations and Inspections of Bureau, Region, and field units.

H.  Bureau and Regional Safety Managers, and Aviation Advisory Committee Representatives.

(1)  Assist field level Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators and Regional Aviation Safety Managers in establishing and meeting aviation program compliance, as applicable.

(2)  Validate through inspections and external audits that required elements of the aviation program are implemented in accordance with policy and regulations.  Track and ensure abatement of aviation findings in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(3)  Coordinate the conduct and documentation of aviation training, as applicable.

I.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, Project Chiefs, and Cooperative Unit Leaders.

(1)  Establish a field-level aviation program through the development of an Aviation Management Plan in compliance with the NAMP.

(2)  Ensure that a project aviation safety plan is developed for local aviation activities.

(3)  Ensure the conduct of local aviation safety self-evaluations and documentation within the IAS.

(4)  Identify and provide resources for the education and training of personnel as required in the Aviation User Training Program and 485 DM.

(5)  Ensure active reporting in the AMIS.

(6)  Ensure subordinate staff are educated and trained as required in the Aviation User Training Program and 485 DM.

J.  Employee, contractors, volunteers and cooperators.  Know and follow DOI and USGS aviation policies, attend and actively participate in appropriate aviation training, report potential and actual problems, and ensure their own and the safety of others.

Appendix 27-1: DOI Aviation Management Board of Directors Charter

Appendix 27-2: Aviation Management Roles and Responsibilities

 

Appendix 27-3: Bureau Aviation Management Responsibilities Summary

Appendix 27-4: Aviation Management Abbreviations

 

Appendix 27-5: Aviation Management Definitions

Appendix 27-6: SGS Aviation Activity Checklist

 

Appendix 27-7: USGS Aviation Management Plan Template

Appendix 27-8: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Notification Requirements

Appendix 27-9: Form 7460-1, Notice of Proposed Construction or Alteration and Instructions for Completing FAA Form 7460-1

Appendix 27-10: FAA Regional Office Addresses

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                December 5, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 28

Underwater Diving Safety

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to reflect organizational changes.

 

1.  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) program requirements for

the scientific diving program.

B.  Provide the authority, policy, and responsibility to execute an OSH program covering diving operations conducted by personnel and organizations of, or under the auspices of, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

C.  This chapter specifies the minimum requirements for a scientific diving program.  The purpose of these requirements is to ensure that all underwater diving (hereafter referred to as diving), using compressed gas, is conducted in a manner that maximizes protection of divers from accidental injury and (or) illness.

D.  These standards encourage and facilitate scientific diving program reciprocity among the Department of the Interior (DOI), other governmental agencies, and academia through sharing of diving expertise and resources.  The chapter provides USGS-specific approaches to diving, tailored to address their unique program mission, research, and resource management requirements.  This chapter also establishes minimum diving, safety, training, equipment, and medical requirements.

E.  Diving is defined as any activity taking place underwater using a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA), surface-supplied air, mixed gases, enriched air (such as nitrox), or a rebreathing apparatus.

F.  The requirements contained in this chapter are applicable to all diving activities performed by USGS personnel.  The USGS is responsible for ensuring that contracted diving services are conducted in accordance with applicable local, State, and Federal regulations.

G.  This chapter is intended for USGS personnel and cooperative divers involved in official activities where any underwater breathing apparatus (other than a snorkel) is used.  All diving operations must comply with the scientific USGS Dive Safety Manual, requiring diver authorization and diving plan approval before a dive takes place.

H.  Ensure that the scientific diving program remains in compliance with applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and the scientific diving exemption from the commercial diving standards (29 CFR 1910 Subpart T Commercial Diving Operations and Appendix B), as well as the DOI Safety and Health Handbook (485 DM).

I.  Ensure that the Dive Safety Board has, at minimum, the necessary authority to fulfill all obligations under OSHA regulations.

J.  Set forth minimum standards for conducting the scientific diving safety program and fundamental requirements and procedures to assure safety in scientific diving operations through the USGS Dive Safety Manual.  The Dive Safety Manual also establishes a framework for reciprocity for organizations that adhere to these minimum standards for joint scientific projects.

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1910 Subpart T Commercial Diving Operations and Appendix B.

B.  29 CFR 1910.1020 Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.

C.  DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

D.  USGS Dive Safety Manual.

E.  SM 308.66 Specialized Safety Program Committees.

F.  29 CFR 1910.440 Recordkeeping Requirements.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  USGS Programs.

(1)  The USGS ensures that its diving policy is wholly consistent with OSHA requirements specified in 29 CFR 1910 Subpart T (Commercial Diving Operations) as amended and Appendix B (Guidelines for Scientific Diving) to that standard.

(2)  The USGS establishes and maintains an active scientific diving program.  The program shall include provisions for the establishment of the Dive Safety Board.  The Dive Safety Board meets or exceeds the requirements in 29 CFR 1910 Subpart T Appendix B and provides administrative oversight of the scientific program to ensure compliance with OSHA, DOI, and USGS requirements.

(3)  Organizations that conduct or participate in diving activities included in exemptions authorized under 29 CFR 1910.401(a)(2) shall ensure that such activities are conducted in strict accordance with these exemptions.  For diving activities conducted under the OSHA exemptions, operational safety requirements are established to ensure that equivalent or greater safety precautions are instituted.  These measures are reviewed and approved by the Dive Safety Board.

(4)  The scientific diving program includes provisions for conducting appropriate dive planning, together with preparation of written diving plans prior to initiating specific diving operations.  Diving plans shall include an activity hazard analysis for each diving assignment/operation.

B.  Minimum Diver Requirements.  

Each diver must:

(1)  Complete a course and be certified by a nationally recognized dive program/agency.  The training, as a minimum, shall meet the requirements of this section.  The USGS establishes additional training requirements as necessary to ensure that divers are qualified to safely perform their mission.

(2)  Take a drug test administered in accordance with 370 DM 792.9 and 370 DM 792.10 for which a negative drug test is received prior to appointment.  Once employed, the diver shall be subject to the DOI’s random drug testing program.

(3)  Undergo a periodic diving medical examination to determine individual’s fitness to dive, as specified in the USGS Dive Safety Manual.  Guidance on medical examinations for underwater divers can be found in the DOI Occupational Medicine Program Handbook.

(4)  Complete a cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course, comparable to American Red Cross (ARC), Divers Alert Network or American Heart Association (AHA) Adult CPR, and a nationally recognized first aid course, taught by the ARC or AHA.  Certifications must be current at the time of dive.  Further emergency medical service training in diving-related subjects and oxygen administration is recommended.

(5)  Make a minimum of 12 logged dives in 12 months with at least one dive in 6 months.  The minimum requirements for a dive are use of an underwater breathing system by the diver and at least a 10-minute surface interval since the previous dive.  Consecutive no-decompression dives with less than a 10-minute surface interval are considered a single dive.

(6)  Complete a minimum of 40 hours of diving-related training over any 3-year period.

(7)  Diver physical fitness is determined by the required medical examination and continued diving activities.

C.  Equipment Inspection.  All diving equipment used by a diver must be professionally inspected according to OSHA, industry, and (or) manufacturers’ standards.

(1)  Equipment used in any diving operation, regardless of ownership, shall be maintained in proper order and be tested according to industry and (or) OSHA requirements prior to any dive operation.

(2)  Records of equipment maintenance and repair shall be maintained for a minimum of 3 years.

D.  Recordkeeping.

(1)  Divers shall maintain a personal dive log of each dive performed (record of dive).  The USGS shall ensure that accurate dive logs are maintained and tabulated on an annual basis.

(2)  A log of equipment modification, repairs, tests, calibration, and maintenance shall be maintained.

(3)  Underwater diving safety records identified above shall be retained as required by 29 CFR 1910.440.  Diver medical records shall be maintained in accordance with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1020 Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records.

E.  Dive Safety Manual.

(1)  The USGS develops and maintains a safe practices manual which includes, as a minimum, the following: procedures covering all diving operations specific to the program; procedures for emergency management, including recompression and evacuation; identification and use of appropriate dive tables and (or) dive computers; criteria for diver training and certification; and aviation flight restrictions following dive operations.  The manual includes appropriate operational safety requirements covering, at a minimum, dive team composition, required equipment, use of hand-held tools and equipment, and pre- and post-dive procedures.

(a)  The Dive Safety Manual provides guidance to personnel conducting diving activities and covers the following:

(i)  Required procedures for diving under the auspices of the USGS.

(ii)  Emergency rescue and care procedures including onsite treatment, recompression, and evacuation.

(iii)  Criteria for diver training and authorization.

(iv)  Establish operational guidelines for the Dive Safety Board.

(b)  Personnel shall meet the following certification requirements prior to being assigned diving duties:

(i)  Hold a current SCUBA certification card (“C” card) issued by an approved national or international underwater diving organization.

(ii)  Pass a comprehensive physical examination as outlined in the Dive Safety Manual.

(iii)  Demonstrate diving proficiency and competence by fulfilling the requirements listed in Chapter 6.1.C of the Dive Safety Manual.

(iv)  Forward copies of the “C” card and dive logs through the Field Dive Officer to the Dive Safety Board for final approval.

(v)  Forward the original medical examination, medical history, and test results to the appropriate servicing Human Resources office.

(vi)  Hold a current certification in CPR, basic/standard first-aid, and emergency oxygen administration.

(c)  In order to maintain diving authorization, all divers are required during any 12-month period to:

(i)  Log the minimum number of dives as required in the Dive Safety Manual to maintain authorization.

(ii)  If a scientific diver’s authorization to dive expires, or is suspended or revoked, the diver may be reauthorized after complying with such conditions as the Dive Safety Officer or Dive Safety Board may impose.  Divers shall be given an opportunity to present their case to the Dive Safety Board before conditions for reauthorization are stipulated.

F.  Dive Safety Board.

(1)  The USGS program includes provision for a Dive Safety Board, with authority over all under water scientific diving, to provide oversight and to ensure a mission-related diving safety program is maintained. 

(2)  The Dive Safety Board, with the majority of its members being active scientific divers, has the authority to approve and monitor diving projects; review and revise underwater diving safety policy; ensure compliance with the Dive Safety Manual; authorize the depths to which a diver has been trained; take disciplinary action for unsafe practices; and ensure adherence to the buddy system (a diver is accompanied by and is in continuous contact with another diver in the water) for SCUBA diving.

(3)  Addresses all diving safety issues and reviews accidents related to diving, inclusive of making recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents.

(4)  See SM 308.66 for the Dive Safety Board membership requirements.

G.  Specialty and Technical Diving.  Divers engaged in specialty and technical diving including, but not limited to, decompression diving, closed-circuit rebreather diving, mixed gas diving, surface-supplied diving, and high altitude diving or cave diving must establish operational procedures specific to the specialty or technical diving covered.  These procedures are incorporated in the Dive Safety Manual and include specific safety and training requirements needed to comply with OSHA's regulations for commercial diving, with community, and (or) manufacturers’ standards.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and dive program criteria.

(2)  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling dive program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office.

(3)  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the dive program. 

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Provide adequate staff and funding resources to effectively implement and administer the dive program within their respective region, mission area, or office.  (Reference 29 CFR 1960.7.)

(2)  Require compliance with statutory, regulatory, and dive program criteria and hold managers and supervisors accountable for effectively fulfilling dive program responsibilities.

C.  Designated Safety and Health Official.  Directs OSH program activities, through the Chief, Office of Management Services, and ensures that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to develop and administer the OSH program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management and administration of the dive program.   

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides administrative support to the Bureau Dive Officer and Dive Safety Board, as appropriate.

(2)  Provides for establishment of a Dive Safety Board. 

(3)  Participates or designates a representative on the Dive Safety Board. 

(4)  Collaborates with the Scientific Diving Program Manager on staffing levels to determine effectiveness in establishing and implementing the dive program. 

F.  Specialized Safety Programs Section Chief.

(1)  Provide Scientific Diving Program oversight, administration, budget coordination and supervision of the Scientific Diving Program Manager.

(2)  Collaborates with Scientific Diving Program Manager on dive program policies, goals, and annual program plans and accomplishments.

(3)  Serves as the OSH program manager designee on the Dive Safety Board.

(4)  Provides support, oversight, and supervision for the Scientific Diving Program Manager.

G.  Scientific Diving Program Manager.

(1)  Serves as the Dive Safety Officer and is an authorized USGS diver.

(2)  Serves as the Dive Safety Board Chair.  Coordinates meetings and agendas and publishes minutes.

(3)  Assists in the drafting of new or revised standards for diving safety programs.

(4)  Coordinates with the Dive Safety Board to compile a fiscal year diving safety program action/accomplishment plan and submit annually to the DASHO through the OSH Program Manager.

(5)  Completes a diving safety program policy self-assessment annually.

(6)  Provides advice and works with other DOI Dive Safety Boards to develop DOI policy and underwater diving safety standards.

(7)  Provides technical scientific diving expertise and assistance in support of mission-related underwater research. 

(8)  Performs external safety audits of diving safety programs and documents within the Inspection and Abatement System.

(9)  Oversees and updates diving safety program Web site.

H.  Dive Safety Board.

(1)  Approves Regional Director appointments of Regional Dive Safety Officers.

(2)  Reviews and revises the Dive Safety Manual as required to maintain currency.  Reviews and revises SM 445-2-H.28 Underwater Diving Safety.

(3)  Submits dive program Web page content and reviews documents and protocols/charters, etc., as appropriate.

(4)  Supports the Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch in the investigation of all dive safety accidents/incidents (i.e., inquiring into the nature and cause of all diving related accidents/incidents), and reports of noncompliance with the Dive Safety Manual and provides recommendations for corrective action.

(5)  Establishes and approves training programs and authorization requirements for divers.

(6)  Coordinates with mission area and Regional Safety Managers on training and dive operations.

(7)  Advises the DASHO and OSH Program Manager on matters of diving policy.

(8)  Develops and maintains diving information management systems, with assistance from regional and Bureau safety managers.

(9)  Reviews the latest diving technology and procedures and disseminates information to the diving community through appropriate organizational contacts.

I.  Regional Dive Safety Officers.

(1)  Serve as members of the Dive Safety Board and are authorized USGS divers.

(2)  Assist in the drafting of new or revised standards for diving safety programs.

(3)  Provide interpretations of regulations and requirements.

(4)  Provide technical assistance to Field Dive Officers, supervisors, and local dive operations with regards to the use of safety protocols and equipment. 

(5)  Complete diving safety program policy self-assessments annually.

(6)  Coordinate dive training when requested by Field Dive Officers and individual dive teams within their regions.

(7)  Work with the Dive Safety Board to establish and approve additional training requirements as necessary to ensure that divers within their regions are qualified to safely perform their missions.

(8)  Perform check-out dives at facilities where there are no Field Dive Officers or the Field Dive Officer is unavailable.

(9)  Work with the Dive Safety Officer to ensure that authorized divers in their region are in compliance with the diving safety program and the Dive Safety Manual.

(10)  Perform external safety audits of diving safety programs and enter dive safety audits into the Inspection and Abatement System.

(11)  Write Letters of Reciprocity for authorized divers that dive with another agency or institution.

(12)  Approve dive plans when needed.

(13)  Maintain records of divers and diving activities within their regions.

(14)  Ensure that properly prepared diving plans, including specialized diving hazard analyses, are written for each dive project in their regions.

(15)  Assist in annual reviews of and (or) revisions of the Dive Safety Manual.

J.  Regional Safety Managers.  Provide support and assistance to field organizational Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) and Field Dive Officers in establishing and implementing dive safety program requirements and training.

K.  Science Center DirectorsCost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that current diving authorizations are maintained as outlined in the Dive Safety Manual for all USGS and cooperative divers under their direction.

(2)  Ensure that all diving operations under their jurisdiction are conducted in accordance with the requirements of this chapter and the Dive Safety Manual.

(3)  Ensure that dive plans are submitted through the local CDSPC to a member of the Dive Safety Board or a Field Dive Officer authorized to approve dive plans, with a copy to the Regional Dive Safety Officer or Dive Safety Officer, when applicable.

L.  Field Dive Officers.

(1)  Review and approve all dive plans to ensure compliance with requirements set forth in this chapter and the Dive Safety Manual.

(2)  Provide advice and guidance to local diving projects.

(3)  Advise local management and the Dive Safety Board, as appropriate, of unsafe diving practices discovered through a review of accident and incident reports or by supervisor requests.

(4)  Transmit records to the Dive Safety Officer for the preparation of the annual report to the DASHO through the OSH Program Manager.

(5)  Participate in local safety committees.

(6)  Maintain records of local divers, diving activities, and dive plans.

M.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist in coordinating approval of local dive plans.

(2)  Maintain approved plans and provide copies to the Regional Dive Safety Officer, as applicable.

N.  Lead Diver.  One member of the dive team is designated as lead diver.  The lead diver acts as the Dive Safety Officer’s representative on each dive.

O.  Individual Diver(s).  As a member of the dive team, the individual diver is responsible for his/her own safety, the safety of the other team members, and compliance with the Dive Safety Manual requirements.

 

5.  Additional Resources.

A.  http://internal.usgs.gov/ops/safetynet/divingprogram.html.

B.  http://www.diversalertnetwork.org.

C.  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Diving Manual, (available through, http://www.bestpub.com).

D.  http://www.aaus.org.

Appendix 28-1: Underwater Diving Safety - Recordkeeping Requirements

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              October 19, 2015
_________________________________                                          ______________        
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                               Date
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 29

Firearms Safety Program

Instruction: This chapter is revised to address U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organizational changes.

 

1.  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum occupational safety and health requirements for the firearms safety program.

B.  The requirements apply to USGS personnel, volunteers, and those who work under USGS funding/direction who, in the performance of their official duties, are required to use government or personally owned firearms for protection against dangerous wildlife or for specimen collection.

C.  Flare guns are not covered under this chapter.

 

2.  References.

A. Physical Security Handbook SM 440-2-H.

B. Property Handbook SM 408-2-H.

C. State Firearm Laws and Regulations pertaining to firearms use, handling, transport, and storage.

D. 18 United States Code (U.S.C.) Crimes and Criminal Procedure, Chapter 44 Firearms.

E. 26 U.S.C. Internal Revenue Code, Chapter 53 Machine Guns, Destructive Devices, and Certain Other Firearms.

F. 27 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 447, 478, and 479.

G. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 495 Explosive Materials Code.

H. 14 CFR 108 Federal Aviation Administration, Department of Transportation, Airplane Operator Security.

 

3. Definitions.

A.  A firearm is defined as any breech-loaded handgun or shoulder-fired small arm from which one or more projectiles are fired by gunpowder or compressed gas. (Devices that resemble firearms and fire blanks, hypodermic darts, cracker shells, etc., can also cause serious injury. Safety training requirements for firearm like devices can be found under section 29.3.7 and (Appendix 29-C.)

B.  Firearm Use denotes use, handle, carry, transport, or storage.

 

4.  Requirements

A.  Certificate of Need and Qualification Inquiry.

(1)  A Certificate of Need (Appendix 29-A, Certificate of Need for Issuance of a Firearm for Official Use) will be completed for all personnel authorized to use a firearm as part of their official duties.  The Certificate of Need will be issued for the time frame required (time frame of use) and, at no time, be issued to cover more than a 12-month period.  An approved study plan is required for issuance of a Certificate of Need for specimen collection.

(2)  Approval of the Certificate of Need will be by a direct supervisor who has knowledge of firearm needs and training in firearms safety.

(3)  Failure to return a firearm by the termination date on the Certificate of Need does not alleviate the responsibility of the user.  The user may be responsible for damage or theft of the firearm.  General accountability guidelines for firearms are that the item is:

(a)  Stored in a locked facility when not in use.

(b)  Removed from public view when leaving an unattended area.

(c)  Closely safeguarded when on travel status.

(4)  On September 30, 1996, 18 United States Code (Chapter 44) §992(g)(9) took effect, making it a felony for anyone convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence to possess firearms or ammunition.  Personnel that use a firearm for official business will be required to fill out a Qualification Inquiry (Appendix 29-B, Qualification Inquiry Form) self-certifying that they have not been convicted of such crimes prior to approval of the Certificate of Need or participation in firearms training.  A new Qualification Inquiry Form will be submitted with each new Certificate of Need or firearms training course request.

B.  Firearms Training.

(1)  Personnel cannot be certified to use a firearm without first successfully completing a USGS approved Basic Firearms Certification Course (BFCC), which includes the 24-hour BFCC for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife (Basic Defense Course) or the 8-hour BFCC for Specimen Collection (Basic Collection Course).  Personnel carrying a firearm for both self-defense and specimen collection must first complete the Basic Defense Course.  The Basic Defense Course can suffice for certification for collection purposes. All firearms safety training must be documented on a SF-182, Authorization, Agreement and Certification of Training Form.

(2)  To recertify for defense purposes, an 8-hour USGS-approved Refresher Firearms Certification Course (RFCC) for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife (Refresher Defense Course) must be attended annually.  Recertification is valid for 12 months.

(3)  To recertify for collection purposes, a USGS-approved RFCC for Specimen Collection must be attended annually.

(4)  The Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife Course must be repeated if the employee:

(a)  Does not attend a Refresher Defense Course annually.

(b)  Does not successfully complete the Refresher Defense Course.

(c)  Has poor performance or unsafe behavior using firearms.

(5)  All training hours specified for USGS Basic and Refresher Firearms Certification courses are to be considered the minimal number of training hours required.

(6)  Alternative firearms certification courses and training schedules may be substituted upon approval of the USGS Firearms Safety Committee or established Regional Firearms Committees.  Contractors should work directly with the USGS Firearms Safety Committee or established Regional Firearms Committee to ensure that contracted training is relevant to survey objectives.  All USGS-approved firearms certification courses must cover the minimum firearms training standards specified in Appendix 29-C, USGS Minimum Firearms Training Standards.

(7)  Personnel who use devices that resemble firearms and that fire blanks, hypodermic darts, cracker shells, etc., will complete firearms safety training listed in Appendix 29-C, USGS Minimum Firearms Training Standards. Training must include at a minimum:

(a)  General Firearms Safety and Four Rules of Firearms Safety;

(b)  Firearms Safety in the Field;

(c)  Bureau Firearms Regulations and Policies;

(d)  Supervisor and Personnel Responsibilities.

C.  Firearms Instructors.

(1)  Personnel who serve as USGS Firearms Instructors for the Basic Defense and Refresher Defense courses will be certified by the USGS Firearms Safety Program Manager.  USGS Firearms Instructors who teach these courses must successfully complete the following training:

(a)  24-hour BFCC for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife;

(b)  8-hour RFCC for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife.  Assisting in the instruction of the Refresher Defense Course can substitute in meeting this training requirement;

(c) USGS Firearms Instructor Certification Course (FICC) for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife.  The FICC for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife is valid for 5 years;

(i)  To recertify as a USGS Firearms Instructor for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife, an appropriate FICC must be successfully completed every 5 years as approved by the USGS Firearms Safety Program Manager. Successful completion of this course will be determined by the USGS Firearms Safety Program Manager, Regional Firearms Managers, and instructors leading the course.

(ii)  Teaching segments of the FICC for Defense Against Dangerous Wildlife while under the purview of the USGS or Regional Firearms Manager can substitute for training.

(d)  Basic National Rifle Association Instructor Certification Program, to include Range Safety Officer;

(e)  An accredited, non-government firearms training course (40 hours minimum) approved by the USGS or Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager;

(f)  Continuing education training from an accredited, government or non-government firearms training course approved by the Bureau or Regional Firearms Manager must be successfully completed every 3 years.

(2)  Personnel who serve as USGS Firearms Instructors for the Basic Collection and Refresher Collection courses will be certified by the USGS Firearms Safety Program Manager.  Firearms Instructors for both these courses must successfully complete the following training elements:

(a)  8-hour BFCC for Specimen Collection (Basic Collection Course);

(b)  USGS approved RFCC for Specimen Collection (Refresher Collection Course).  Assisting in the instruction of the Refresher-Collection Course can substitute in meeting this training requirement;

(c)  USGS FICC for Specimen Collection.

(i)  The FICC for Specimen Collection is valid for 5 years.

(ii)  To recertify as a USGS Firearms Instructor for Specimen Collection, an appropriate FICC must be successfully completed every 5 years.

(iii)  Assisting in the instruction of the FICC for Specimen Collection can substitute in meeting this training requirement.

(3)  In addition to the above training, all USGS Firearms Instructors must be able to demonstrate the ability to independently and effectively teach the fundamentals of firearms safety in accordance with the USGS Firearms Instructor Manuals.

(4)  Non-USGS government personnel or private contractors who serve as firearms instructors must meet certain standards. All contracted firearms safety training courses will be evaluated by the USGS Firearms Committee or an established Regional Firearms Committee to ensure adequate coverage of the course content listed in Appendix 29-C, USGS Minimum Firearms Training Standards and USGS Firearms Instructor Manuals.

(5)  Non-USGS government personnel or private contractors who serve as firearms instructors must have the following minimum training and certification requirements:

(a)  Firearms Instructor Certification from an established Firearms Training Program (e.g., National Rifle Association Instructor Certification);

(b)  Experience teaching firearms safety to include a curriculum containing lesson plans that stress the potential hazards associated with firearms use and establish appropriate safeguards to minimize the risks and liabilities to both students and instructors.

(6)  Assistant Firearms Instructors and instructor-candidates will be appointed by their respective Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager.

(7)  USGS personnel who serve as Assistant Firearms Instructors and instructor-candidates will have successfully completed appropriate USGS Basic and Refresher Firearms Safety courses.  In addition, they will have demonstrated proficiency in the safe use and handling of firearms, participated in ongoing shooting range activities, and shown an interest in the USGS Firearms Safety Program and firearms safety instruction.

D.  USGS Firearms Safety Committee.

(1)  The USGS Firearms Safety Committee has been established and will operate in accordance with Survey Manual Chapter 308.66, Specialized Safety Committees.

E.  Regional Firearms Committees.

(1)  Regional Firearms Safety Committees may be established at the discretion of the Regional Director to oversee firearms safety training in the region, assist managers in selecting appropriate contractors for firearms safety training, and evaluate contractor course curriculum.

(2)  The Regional Firearms Manager, appointed by the Regional Director, will oversee the respective regional firearms activities and chair the regional firearms safety committee, if established.

(3)  Regional firearms safety committee membership will be representative from organizations that use firearms.

 

5. Recordkeeping.

A.  Local firearms safety staff will maintain files containing the following information:

(1)  Firearms safety training records for personnel who attend USGS Basic and Refresher Firearms Certification courses to ensure training is up to date.

(2)  Certificate of Need records.

(3)  Inventories of firearms maintained in their armory.

(4)  Firearms sign-out logs which must include location and employee names.

(5)  All records of firearms maintenance and repair.

(6)  Records of unintended firearms discharges in training and field work environments.

(7)  Records of lost, stolen, or functionally-damaged firearms.

B.  Firearms Accidents or Incidents.

For any firearm accident, incident (inclusive of discharges), or defensive action, the supervisor authorizing the Certificate of Need will complete a report in the Department of Interior Safety Management Information System (SMIS) as described in SM 445-2-H.7.  In addition, a hard copy of the SMIS report will be forwarded through local management to the Firearms Safety Program Manager for review by the Firearms Safety Committee.

 

6. Safe Storage and Security.

A.  Storage.

(1)  All firearms and ammunition will be stored in a secure area under lock and key when not being used in the field, in transit, or the firearm is not under the direct control of the employee in accordance with the Firearms and Ammunition section in SM 440-2-H.10.C Physical Security Handbook.  “Under lock and key” means that the firearm is to be stored in a locked hard case or stored in a soft gun case with a trigger safety lock employed.

B.  Transportation.

(1)  General Transportation.

(a)  All firearms and ammunition will be transported in accordance with the Firearms and Ammunition section in SM 440-2-H.10.C Physical Security Handbook.

(b)  Firearms will be unloaded during transportation.

(c)  Neither the firearms nor any ammunition being transported will be directly accessible from the passenger compartment of the transporting vehicle.  In the case of a vehicle without a compartment separate from the driver’s compartment, the firearm or ammunition will be contained in a locked container other than the glove compartment or console.

(d)  Any personnel authorized to use a firearm in the field must follow the State and municipal laws concerning the transportation and mode of carry of firearms in the transporting vehicle.  Note: State permits authorizing concealed carry are not recognized by the USGS and do not apply to government personnel as long as the employee is on official duty.

(2)  Aircraft Travel.

(a)  Firearms, ammunition, and firearm parts may be permitted in checked baggage if unloaded and properly locked with Transportation Security Administration (TSA) approved locks in a hard-sided container.

(b)  Firearms, ammunition, and firearm parts transported on commercial airlines must be declared to the airline. Before checking any firearm to be carried in the baggage, employees must read and sign the Firearms Unloaded Declaration tag stating that the firearm is unloaded.

(c)  Ammunition must be separated from the locked firearm container, shipped in factory-sealed containers, and limited to 11 pounds weight.  The Federal Aviation Administration and airlines may have additional restrictions on the amount of ammunition that may be placed in checked baggage.

(d)  Even if an item is generally permitted on commercial flights, it may be subject to additional screening or not allowed through the checkpoint if it triggers an alarm during the screening process, appears to have been tampered with, or poses other security concerns.  The final decision rests with TSA on whether to allow any items on the plane.

(e)  For mission aircraft operations, firearms and ammunition must be declared to the pilot or authorized representative prior to boarding, and hazard materials training is required in accordance with the Interagency Aviation Training Guidebook.

C.  Lost or Stolen Firearms.

(1)  Lost or stolen firearms will be reported within 24 hours, by the employee who checked out the firearm, to the USGS Firearms Safety Program Manager and Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager, the local law enforcement agency for entry into the National Crime Information Center System, and to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms (ATF) and Explosive’s Stolen Firearms Program Manager toll free at 1-888-930-9275 or 800-ATF-GUNS.

(2)  Any missing or lost ammunition will be reported within 24 hours to the USGS and/or Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager.

D.  Ammunition.

(1)  Damaged or hand-loaded ammunition will not be used. Damaged or faulty ammunition will be disposed of as recommended by the Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager or local Firearms Safety Officer.

(2)  Small arms ammunition (e.g., rifle, pistol, or shotgun cartridges) will be separated from materials classified by the U. S. Department of Transportation as flammable liquids, flammable solids, and oxidizing materials by a distance of 15 feet or by a fire partition having a fire resistance of at least 1 hour.

(3)  Small arms ammunition will not be stored together with Division 1.1, Division 1.2, or Division 1.3 explosives unless the storage facility is suitable for storage of explosive materials.

 

7.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and firearms safety program criteria;

(2)  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling firearms safety program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office;

(3)  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the firearms safety program.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Provide adequate staff and funding resources to effectively implement and administer the firearms safety program within their respective region, mission area, or office; (Reference 29 CFR 1960.7.)

(2)  Require compliance with statutory, regulatory, and firearms safety program criteria and hold managers and supervisors accountable for effectively fulfilling firearms safety program responsibilities;

(3)  Designate individuals to serve as the Regional Firearms Manager.  Designate representatives to serve on the Firearms Safety Committee and Regional Safety Committee, if established.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.  Directs firearms safety program activities, through the Chief, Office of Management Services, and ensures that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to develop and administer the firearms safety program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management and administration of the firearms safety program.

E.  Chief/Deputy Chief/Section Chiefs, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch.

(1)  Designates an individual as the responsible person for all firearms training and certification activities within USGS (i.e., the Bureau Firearms Manager [BFM]);

(2)  Provides final concurrence on substitutions to other firearms training programs upon review and approval by the BFM;

(3)  Provides final concurrence on training necessary for the safe operation on firearms-like devices upon the recommendations of the BFM and/or Firearms Safety Committee;

(4)  Provides for the establishment of a Firearms Safety Committee, which advises the DASHO and Chief, Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch through ad hoc membership on the Occupational Safety and Health Council, to address all firearms issues and reviews all accidents related to firearms, inclusive of making recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents;

(5)  Provides administrative support to the BFM and Firearms Safety Committee, as appropriate;

(6)  Provide firearms safety program oversight, administration, budget coordination, and supervision of the Firearms Safety Program Manager;

(7)  Collaborates with Firearms Safety Program Manager on firearm safety program policies, goals and annual program plans and accomplishments;

(8)  Serves on the USGS Firearm Safety Committee;

(9) Provides support, oversight, and supervision for the Firearm Safety Program Manager.

F.  Firearms Safety Program Manager.

(1)  Serves as the principal firearms technical expert on firearms-related issues;

(2)  Develops and recommends firearm-related policies for review by the USGS Firearms Safety Committee;

(3)  Maintains and reviews copies of all accidents and incidents involving a firearm used on official duty.  Identifies any trends and make recommendations for future preventive actions;

(4)  Serves as lead investigator for firearms serious accidents involving serious injury or major property damage;

(5)  Oversees all USGS Basic, Refresher, and Instructor Firearms Safety Training Programs and monitors training to ensure consistency, accuracy, coverage, and overall quality;

(6)  Develops USGS Firearms Safety Certification Course materials and updates all USGS Firearms Safety Training Manuals;

(7)  Serves as an advisor to the OSH Council, DASHO, Bureau OSH Manager and Specialized Safety Programs Section Chief, Regional Firearms Safety Program Managers, and local Firearms Safety Officers;

(8)  Chairs the Firearms Safety Committee and is responsible for the coordination of meetings, agendas, and for publishing minutes;

(9)  Oversees regulatory issues associated with firearms safety training and the issuance and use of firearms;

(10)  Verifies that the Regional Firearms Managers, Firearms Safety Officers, Firearms Safety Instructors, and firearms users have received adequate firearms safety training to perform competently in their positions;

(11)  Coordinates with the Firearms Safety Committee to compile a fiscal year firearms safety program action/accomplishment plan and submits annually to the Bureau OSH Manager;

(12)  Completes a firearms safety policy self-assessment annually;

(13)  Maintains firearms program management databases (i.e., training, operator, instructor, inventory).

G.  Regional Safety Managers.  Provide support and assistance to the Regional Firearms Managers, Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators, and Firearms Safety Officers in establishment and implementation of firearms safety program requirements and training.

H.  Regional Firearms Safety Program Managers.

(1)  Serve as a focal point for all firearm-related matters in the respective region;

(2)  Maintain regional firearms records;

(3)  Coordinate training activities in conjunction with firearms representatives;

(4)  Assist firearms representatives in selecting appropriate contractors for firearms safety training and evaluating contractor course curricula;

(5)  Oversee regional firearms activities and chairs the Regional Firearms Committee, if established;

(6)  Assist the USGS Firearms Manager with policy and training curricula development.

I.  Firearms Safety Officers.

(1)  Serve as a focal point for all firearms-related matters in their respective field organization;

(2)  Maintain local firearms records;

(3)  Coordinate training activities in conjunction with the Regional Firearms Manager and Regional Firearms Representative.

J.  Firearms Instructors.

(1)  Participate in Regional Firearms Safety Committee activities, if established.

(2)  Maintain a level of instructional and technical proficiency as described within this chapter and as recommended by the Regional Firearms Manager.

(3)  Teach the USGS Basic and Refresher Firearms Certification courses in accordance with the USGS Firearms Instructor Manual(s).

K.  Assistant Firearms Instructors.

(1)  Perform firearms-related duties as assigned by and under the direction of the Regional Firearms Manager or certified USGS Firearms Instructor;

(2)  Maintain currency with firearms training requirements described in this chapter.

L.  Organizational Managers. Provide appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish a local firearms safety program inclusive of training, periodic inspection and maintenance, and personal protective and other equipment necessary for safe operation of firearms in all conditions.

M.  Supervisors.

(1)  Obtain and maintain a Qualification Inquiry from each person authorized to use a firearm self-certifying they have not been convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence charges prior to issuance of the Certificate of Need;

(2)  Verify completion of employee firearms safety and related required training prior to issuance of the Certificate of Need;

(3)  Obtain a Certificate of Need for each employee authorized to use a firearm and forward a copy to the local Firearms Safety Officer.

N. Personnel.

(1)  Complete the Basic or Refresher Firearms Certification course(s) and maintain currency with all firearms training requirements specified in this chapter;

(2)  Ensure the safety use of all firearms under his or her control;

(3) Maintain all personal-owned firearms used for official business in safe, serviceable condition.

Appendix 29-A: Certificate of Need for Issuance of a Firearm for Official Use

 

Appendix 29-B: USGS Firearm Qualification Inquiry

 

Appendix 29-C: USGS Minimum Firearms Training Standards

 

 

/s/ Jose R.Aragon                                                                      July 20, 2016
___________________________________________          ___________________

Jose R. Aragon

Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 30

Ionizing Radiation

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to reflect organizational changes.  Requirements for a Radiation Advisory Board and a Radiation Safety Program Manager have been eliminated.  Responsibility for program implementation remains a supervisory responsibility, with policy and operational support provided by health physicist, radiation protection officer, and occupational safety and health staff.  In addition, radon is addressed for field and indoor air.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum requirements for protecting employees and the public from adverse exposure to ionizing radiation.

 

2.  Scope.

A.  This chapter applies to employees and others covered by workers’ compensation and conduct activities involving the use of radioactive materials and other ionizing radiation sources to include licensed radioactive materials, general licensed devices, X-ray producing devices, and Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM).

B.  This chapter does not alter or supersede the requirements established by licenses issued to the USGS by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).  Activities involving radioactive materials under an NRC license, and where such activities are compliant with the licenses and NRC regulations, are in compliance with this policy.

 

3.  References.

A.  Public Law 91-596, "Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970," Section 19.

B.  Executive Order 12196, "Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees."

C.  10 CFR, Chapter I, Parts 1 – 199, Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

D.  29 CFR 1910.1096,  Ionizing Radiation.

E.  Department Manual, Part 485, Chapter 21, Radiation Safety – Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation.

F.  American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Health Physics Society (HPS) N43.2-2001, Radiation Safety for X-ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Analysis Equipment.

G.  ANSI/HPS N43.3-2008, For General Radiation Safety-Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies Up to 10 MeV.

H.  American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, Ionizing Radiation, (latest edition).

I.  Department of Transportation (DOT) Standards, 49 CFR, Chapter I, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Department of Transportation.

J.  Federal Property Management Regulations, 41 CFR Part 102-80, Safety and Environmental Management.

 

4.  Definitions.

A.  Ionizing Radiation.  The most energetic form of radiation, capable of removing electrons from atoms (ionization) and damaging the DNA within living cells.  X-rays, gamma rays, and alpha and beta particles are examples of ionizing radiation.

B.  General Licensed Materials.  Byproduct materials subject to the NRC regulations that are contained in devices which have been manufactured or initially transferred and labeled in accordance with the specifications contained in a specific license.  General licensed materials are often used to detect, measure, gauge, or control the thickness, density, level, or chemical composition of various items.  Examples of such devices are gas chromatographs (detector cells), density gauges, fill-level gauges, and static elimination devices.

C.  Radon.  A naturally occurring radioactive gas found in soils, rock, and water throughout the U.S.  Exposure to radon and its decay products is associated with an increase in the incidence of lung cancer among the general population.  Radon is a natural decay product of uranium and thorium.  The isotope of interest is Radon-222 and its decay products.

D.  Radiation Protection Officer.  Designated cost center employee who oversees the use of radioactive material and devices that produce ionizing radiation.

E.  Radiation Safety Officer.  Person who oversees the NRC broad scope or other specific licenses issued to the USGS and implements or ensures implementation of license requirements in accordance with NRC regulations, NUREG-1556, and established procedures.

F.  Radiation Sources.  Radioactive materials or devices that produce ionizing radiation.  These sources include, but are not limited to, byproduct materials and X-ray producing devices.

G.  Radioactive Material.  Any material which emits, by spontaneous nuclear disintegration, ionizing radiation in the form of particulate or electromagnetic emanations.

H.  Restricted Area.  An area or room where access is controlled to protect an individual from exposure to radiation or radioactive materials.

I.  Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials.  Natural materials containing radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium and their decay products.  A potential health concern is when these natural materials or their decay products are inhaled as dust (e.g., radon and its decay products).  NORM is also a hazard when it is concentrated as a result of human activity such as waste streams generated by processes such as oil and gas production, mining, mineral processing, or water treatment, and various other processes which may increase the concentration and radioactivity above that found naturally; also called Technologically Enhanced NORM.

J.  X-rays.  Penetrating electromagnetic radiation (photons) having a wavelength that is much shorter than that of visible light.  These rays are usually produced by excitation of the electron field around certain nuclei.

K.  Working Level Month.  An exposure to any combination of short-lived radon daughters in one liter of air that will result in the ultimate emission of 1.3 x 105 mega-electron volts (MeV) of potential alpha particle energy for 170 hours.

 

5.  Requirements

A.  USGS shall protect employees and the public against exposures to ionizing radiation and shall comply with the appropriate standards and regulations.

B.  Every reasonable effort shall be made to maintain exposures to employees and to the public “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) and at no time shall exceed the limits set by 10 CFR 20 and 29 CFR 1910.1096.

C.  Do not assign employees under the age of 18 to radiological duties that expose them to ionizing radiation; areas or sites where radiological work is conducted; or, where radioactive materials are stored.

D.  Conducting activities or possessing radioactive materials under a license issued by the NRC shall be performed in accordance with the license requirements and applicable NRC regulations.

E.  The use and possession of radiation sources not requiring NRC licensing shall be in accordance with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.1096 and ANSI standards.

F.  The USGS shall develop, document, and implement a radiation protection program that governs the use and exposure to ionizing radiation.  The radiation protection program shall include the following, at a minimum:

(1)  Establish a process that provides accountability and control of radiation sources through procurement, use, storage, and final disposition.  This includes an annual physical inventory of radiation sources or more often when specified by governing regulations and established procedures.

(2)  To the extent practical, use of radiological controls and practices, such as shielding ionizing radiation sources and equipment, should have procedures implemented to maintain exposures to ALARA, and should not exceed applicable dose limits in 10 CFR 20 and 29 CFR 1910.1096. 

(3)  Conduct surveys and monitoring to determine the magnitude and extent of radiation levels, concentrations, quantities of radioactive material, and potential radiological hazards.  Perform leak testing of sealed sources, X-ray producing devices, and other radiation-producing equipment housing radioactive materials or generating ionizing radiation.

(4)  Evaluate ionizing radiation exposures to individual employees and members of the public where required.

(5)  Post restricted areas or rooms with the appropriate radiation caution or danger signage bearing the standard radiation symbol (e.g., 3-bladed, magenta on yellow background, black on white background, or black on yellow background) and prevent unauthorized access.

(6)  Label container with the appropriate radiation caution or danger signage in which radioactive materials are transported, stored, or used, and maintain appropriate manufacturer’s labels on radiation producing devices.

(7)  Establish emergency and immediate evacuation procedures.

(8)  Transport radioactive materials in accordance with the appropriate DOT regulations and conduct radiation surveys, as needed, on packages containing radioactive materials prior to shipping and accepting receipt within the regulated time frame.  Transport of licensed radioactive material shall be coordinated through the Radiation Safety Officer.

(9)  Provide appropriate and effective training to employees and individuals who are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation.  Training shall be provided at the time of initial assignment and repeated if there is a change in operational procedure or exposure.

(10)  Properly secure and store radioactive materials.

(11)  Radioactive waste shall be managed and disposed of in accordance with applicable regulations.

(12)  Repair, maintenance, and alignment of X-ray producing devices, equipment housing NRC general licensed materials, and other ionizing radiation producing and measuring equipment shall be conducted by a trained and qualified individual of the manufacturer or an individual approved by the Radiation Safety Officer.

(13)  Make appropriate notification and reporting of radiation incidences and over exposures to the Radiation Safety Officer who will report to the appropriate governing authority.  In addition, report all radiation incidents to the supervisor immediately and complete an accident report in the Safety Management Information System (SMIS).  Incidents should include near misses, first aid, or medical treatment.

(14)  Maintain records of, including but not limited to, surveys, exposures, training, public dose, leak testing, maintenance, and audits. 

(15)  Employees shall be notified of their exposure in accordance with applicable regulations or standards.   

(16)  Establish a declared pregnant worker program that initiates appropriate protective actions against exposure to ionizing radiation once a pregnancy is voluntarily declared in writing to management.

(17)  Assess local compliance with program requirements annually.

(18)  Assess radiation safety program compliance every 3 years in conjunction with the overall occupational safety and health program evaluations. 

(19)  External program assessments for licensed activities shall be accomplished by the Radiation Safety Officer and the NRC in accordance with license requirements.

G.  Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials.

(1)  Evaluate potential exposures for employees involved in handling and storing NORM and conducting activities at sites where exposures are expected to be above background radiation levels (e.g., hot-rock storage rooms) and radon and gamma radiation from working in uranium mines or uranium tailing sites. 

(2)  Implement procedures to ensure exposures do not exceed limits in 29 CFR 1910.1096.

(3)  Designate and post “airborne radioactivity area” signage for locations where airborne concentrations of radioactive materials exceed Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) airborne limits or where personal exposures exceed 25 percent of the airborne limits.

(4)  Post appropriate signage on rooms and storage areas with radioactive materials.

(5)  Appropriately label containers containing naturally occurring uranium or thorium exceeding quantities defined in 29 CFR 1910.1096(e)(6)(ii).

(6)  Use personal protective equipment when required by a job hazard analysis.

(7)  Practice good housekeeping where NORM is handled or stored.  Practice good personal hygiene when handling NORM. 

(8)  Provide training to employees working with NORM at time of initial assignment.

(9)  Inform the radiation safety officer of procedures, quantity of material, products from the procedure, and storage or final disposition when processing NORM (e.g., grinding, leaching, and chemical treatments).  Processed NORM may be required to have a permit under a NRC specific license.

(10)  Requirements for Radon in Field Work.

(a)  In field locations where airborne radon concentrations could potentially be enhanced above background levels, employees and volunteers shall not be exposed above four working level months per year.  (This equates to a daily average airborne concentration of 30 pCi/L.)  Such locations may include, but are not limited to, caves, uranium mines, uranium tailing sites, and ground-level or below-ground vaults.  Employees under the age of 18 shall not be assigned to enter field sites where radon levels are expected to be above background.  Every reasonable effort shall be made to maintain radon exposures to employees “as low as reasonably achievable.”  

(b)  Field structures with airborne concentrations of radon that are at or exceed 25 pCi/L shall be posted as an “airborne radioactivity area” and employee exposures shall be evaluated.

(11)  Requirements for Radon in Indoor Environments.  

(a)  For workplace occupancies (e.g., administrative buildings) measured airborne concentrations of radon shall be maintained below 25 pCi/L.

(b)  Measured concentrations in residential, day-care, or school facilities shall be maintained below 4 pCi/L.

(c)  Residential and non-residential occupancies shall be initially tested for radon and mitigated where mitigation action levels are reached or exceeded in accordance with General Services Administration Public Buildings Service (PBS) Radon Policy and Procedure, PBS P 5940.2.

(d)  Employees under the age of 18 shall not be exposed to indoor air radon concentrations at or in excess of 3 pCi/L as a time weighted average calculated over a 40-hour work week, in accordance with OSHA’s ionizing radiation standard, 29 CFR 1910.1090.  Where the employee’s exposure is calculated at or in excess of 3 pCi/L, the area shall be mitigated, the employee’s access to the area shall be limited, or the employee shall be relocated to lower the employee’s exposure below the OSHA standard.

 

6.  Responsibilities

A.  Director.  Directs radiation protection program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO).

B.  Associate Directors/Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided for the implementation of the ionizing radiation protection program and for compliance with national consensus standards under their purview.

(2)  Hold managers and supervisors accountable for ensuring radiological activities in their region are conducted in accordance with NRC licenses, applicable regulations, and established procedures.

(3)  Ensure that program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1) Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective radiation protection program.

(2)  Assigns radiation protection program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

(3)  Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish and maintain a bureauwide radiation protection program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Assigns radiation safety program responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for management and administration.

(2)  Ensures that staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support radiation safety program needs.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Develops national policies and guidance on the ionizing radiation protection program.

(2)  Oversees implementation of the ionizing radiation protection program.

(3)  Acts as liaison to the Department of Interior’s (DOI) Occupational Safety and Health Council and represents USGS ionizing radiation safety interests to DOI and OSHA.

(4)  Advises and supports the Chief, Office of Management Services and the DASHO on radiation safety program responsibilities.

(5)  Provides support, technical assistance, and direction in carrying out program requirements.

(6)  Oversees ionizing radiation safety program compliance and implementation and provides management with recommendations for program improvement.

F.  Industrial Hygienist(s).  Provide technical ionizing radiation support and guidance to management and safety staff for X-ray producing devices, NORM, and other OSHA regulated ionizing radiation.

G.  Health Physicist.

(1)  Appointed as Radiation Safety Officer for the NRC broad scope licenses.

(2)  Assists in implementing license requirements in accordance with NRC regulations, NUREG-1556, and established procedures.

(3)  Provides technical oversight and support for NRC general licensed materials. 

(4)  Audits broad scope license and permittee activities in accordance with NRC license requirements.

(5)  Ensures that operational reviews (self-audits) are conducted and documented by local permittees within the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS) and tracks abatement actions through closure.

(6)  Coordinates with the management representative and local supervisors to ensure identified audit deficiencies related to respective broad scope license activities are appropriately addressed and abated.

(7)  Serves as a member on the Radiation Safety Committee.

(8)  Ensures the conduct of training to meet license and permit requirements.

(9)  Provides technical oversight and support for NRC general licensed materials. 

(10)  Assesses NRC licensed ionizing radiation safety program compliance and implementation.

(11)  Makes appropriate notification and reporting of radiation incidences and overexposures to the appropriate governing authority.

H.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Assist local science center management and collateral duty safety program coordinators in implementing local radiation safety programs. 

(2)  Ensure that local ionizing radiation safety program self-audits are conducted and documented within the IAS and track abatement actions through closure.

(3)  Assess local compliance of radiation safety program by conducting external audits of local cost centers based on scope of activities and risk.  Document audits within the IAS and track abatement actions through closure.

(4)  Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch National Programs Section staff shall provide services detailed in H (1-3) above for Associate Directors.

I.  Reactor Administrator.

(1)  Ensures that the reactor supervisor and reactor staff is provided with the authority and resources necessary for successful development, implementation, and continued improvement of the reactor radiation safety program.

(2)  Ensures that senior management is routinely apprised of issues related to the implementation of the reactor’s radiation safety program.

J.  Reactor Supervisor.  Establishes and implements the radiation safety program for the Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor in accordance with NRC regulations and established procedures.

K.  Reactor Health Physicist.  Ensures the day-to-day implementation of the radiation safety program of the TRIGA reactor in accordance with NRC regulations, established procedures, and license.

L.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Directors and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that radiological activities performed by center personnel are adequately funded to ensure the successful development, implementation and continued improvement of the radiation safety program under their supervision.

(2)  Ensure that radiological activities under their supervision are carried out in accordance with radiation safety policies and procedures.

(3)  Ensure that findings and deficiencies of radiological activities under their supervision are addressed and resolved in a timely manner.

(4)  Ensure that annual operational self-audits are conducted of radiological activities under their supervision and that findings are documented in the IAS.

M.  Local Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators/Radiation Protection Officers.  Assist local management and employees in providing technical oversight and support for NRC general licensed materials and ionizing radiation sources not regulated under a specific NRC license, including but not limited to, X-ray producing devices and NORM. 

N.  Principal User, Permit Holder, and Authorized User of NRC-Licensed Material.  Conducts radiological activities in accordance with the requirements of the radioisotope use permit, NRC regulations, and established procedures.

O.  Employees.

(1)  Use and handle X-ray producing devices, NRC general licensed materials, and NORM in accordance with policies and established procedures including practices to maintain exposures ALARA.

(2)  Wear personal monitoring devices when required.

(3)  Report exposure incidents, spills, or releases to supervisors to investigate.

(4)  Complete appropriate radiation protection training prior to performing activities involving X-ray producing devices, NRC general licensed materials, and NORM.

(5)  Report all radiation incidents the supervisor immediately and complete an accident report in the SMIS.  Incidents should include near misses and first aid or medical treatment.  For incidents involving NRC licensed materials, the Radiation Safety Officer shall be notified.

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              December 11, 2015

                                                                                                            ______________________ 
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                               Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 31

Watercraft Safety

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to reflect current guidance, responsibilities, and includes two new appendices, Appendix 31-E for airboats and Appendix 31-F for non-motorized watercraft.  Field offices have one year from the effective date of this directive to become compliant with the requirements established in Appendix 31-F.

 

1.  Purpose.  This chapter specifies minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for the safe operation of watercraft and for the training and certification of watercraft operators.

A.  This chapter applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operations and personnel who use any type of Class A or Class 1 motorboats or non-motorized watercraft.  (Motorboats that are 26 feet in length or greater are covered by SM 445-2-H.49, Large Vessel Safety Program Management).

B.  This chapter supplements existing regulations and requirements established by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), the Department of the Interior (DOI), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.  Deviations from the requirements of this chapter are not permitted except as described in this chapter.

C.  This chapter establishes requirements related to specialized watercraft modules and related safety training requirements.

 

2.  References.

A.  33 CFR Navigation and Navigable Waters Subchapter S (Parts 173 - 199), Boating Safety.

B.  46 CFR Shipping.

C.  U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Instruction M16672.2D, Navigation Rules (International-Inland).

D.  Public Law 91-596 Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Section 19, Federal Agency Safety Programs and Responsibilities.

E.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

F.  29 CFR 1910, Occupational Safety and Health Standard (General Industry).

G.  29 CFR 1915, Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Shipyard Employment.

H.  29 CFR 1917, Marine Terminals.

I.  29 CFR 1918, Safety and Health Regulations for Longshoring.

J.  46 US Code Section 2101, General Definitions.

K.  American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) 107-2010 American National Standard for High Visibility Safety Apparel and Headwear Devices.

L.  SM 445-2-H.14, Safety and Health Training.

M.  SM 445-2-H.49, Large Vessel Safety Program Management.

N.  485 Department Manual (DM) 22, Watercraft.

 

3.  Definitions.

A.  Watercraft.  Boats, including but not limited to air boats, hovercraft, jet skis, sailboats, canoes, kayaks, and rafts.  Seaplanes used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on water are not included.

B.  Motorboat.  Vessels 65 feet in length or less and propelled by machinery (including steam).

C.  Class A Motorboat.  Motorboats less than 16 feet in length.

D.  Class 1 Motorboat.  Motorboats 16 feet or over and less than 26 feet in length.

E.  Non-motorized Watercraft.  Watercraft propelled by oars, paddles, or other non-mechanical equipment.

F.  Special Use Watercraft.  Watercraft often unique in design and propulsion with unique maneuvering capabilities requiring additional specialized training and safety considerations for the operator, crew, and passengers.  Examples include airboats, hovercraft, and personal watercraft (jet skis).

G.  Motorboat Operator Certification Course (MOCC).  Training course that certifies an individual to operate a motorized watercraft under 26 feet in length. 

H.  Motorboat Operator Instructor Certification Course (MOICC).  Training course that certifies an individual to instruct MOCC.

I.  Motorboat Operator Certification Course Instructor Trainer.  A person approved by the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager to instruct MOCC instructors.

J.  Operator.  Person in physical control of the watercraft.

K.  Crew.  Personnel other than the operator who are essential to the operation of the watercraft.

L.  Passenger.  Personnel on board a watercraft with no assigned crew duties or responsibilities.

M.  Personal Floatation Device (PFD).  Device designed to keep a person afloat in the water, commonly referred to as a life jacket.

N.  Marlinespike.  The art of seamanship that includes the tying of various knots, splicing, working with cable or wire rope, worming, parceling, serving and even making decorative ornaments from rope or line.

O.  Accident/Incident.  See SM 445-2-H.7, Incident/Accident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation. 

 

4.  Requirements.  Science Centers engaged in watercraft operations must establish a watercraft safety program that includes the following minimum requirements:

A.  Safe watercraft operation.

(1)  Watercraft must be operated in a safe and prudent manner and in accordance with recognized Federal, State, and local laws and standards, in addition to the requirements of this chapter.  In the event of any conflict, the more stringent requirement applies.

(2)  Watercraft must be operated in compliance with USCG Boating Safety Regulations and Standards referenced in this chapter.

(3)  All accidents and incidents involving watercraft must be reported and investigated.

(4)  Watercraft must have a dedicated operator while underway and sufficient number of crew members to support watercraft operations.

(5)  Solo Operations. 

(a)  Solo Operations will only be performed under the following:

(i)  A Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) will be established outlining specific safety concerns and methods to reduce risks.

(ii)  A stringent float plan will be established including a call-in procedure.

(iii)  The JHA will be reviewed annually.

(iv)  Employees involved in shuttling a watercraft for the purposes of loading the boat at a boat ramp or picking up passengers or crew are exempt from this provision.

(6)  Watercraft will meet or exceed applicable USCG safety design/equipment requirements.

(7)  The capacity plate required by 33 CFR Part 183.23 must be permanently displayed in a legible manner and clearly visible to the operator.

(8)  All motorized monohull watercraft less than 20 feet in length (excluding sailboats, canoes, kayaks and inflatable boats) must have a manufacturer capacity plate indicating the maximum horsepower, maximum allowable load weight and any other safe load limits that apply.

(9)  Capacity, of all boats, not equipped with a manufacturer capacity plate should be estimated and communicated to the operator.  Estimates may be calculated using 33 CFR Part 183 Subpart C, Safe Loading.

(10)  Agency Identification. 

(a)  Agency identification consists of USGS identifiers such as the USGS logo or research vessel name.

(b)  Agency identification will be displayed at the most visible point of the craft on the port and starboard sides.

(c)  In the event it is determined that USGS identity may compromise the execution of a mission or the safety of the field personnel, USGS identity may be temporarily removed or covered. Local law enforcement, marine patrol or other enforcement agencies will be notified prior to the mission.  Upon completion of the mission, USGS identifiers will be displayed on the watercraft.

(d)  Airboats must display the identifier on the rudder(s).

(11)  Required equipment for all motorized watercraft.

(a)  In addition to primary safety devices required by Federal, State, and (or) local regulations, watercraft must be outfitted based on expected operating conditions such as large bodies of water, remote rivers, and coastal areas with other emergency safety equipment necessary for safe operation.  This may include communications gear, navigation equipment, and satellite navigation.

(b)  Special consideration will be given for the use of emergency location devices such as an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon, personal locator beacon, or commercially available satellite messenger system such as the Satellite Personal Tracker (SPOT) or DeLorme satellite messenger.  Use of these devices is mandated where situations warrant the need such as remote areas with poor or no cell phone service.

(c)  Watercraft must be equipped with adequate and proven communications for the area(s) of operation (e.g., cell phone, satellite phone, and (or) VHF radio).  Incorporating the use of communications equipment into the float plan is highly recommended to ensure employee safety.

(d)  USCG approved sound producing device. 

(e)  Type IV throwable floatation device is required for watercraft greater than 16 feet and recommended for watercraft 16 feet or less.

(f)  Rope throw bag.

(12)  Additional required equipment for all motorized watercraft. 

(a)  Three day/night visual distress signals.

(b)  Bailing device and (or) bilge pump.

(c)  Automatic kill cord.  Redundant engine systems may be wired with one common automatic kill switch or two kill switches with lanyards securely combined.

(d)  At least one portable Type ABC fire extinguisher and (or) a fire suppression system.  These must be USCG approved for marine use, be mounted, and readily accessible.

(e)  Adequate anchor and line for the conditions.

(f)  First aid kit and tool kit.  Both kits must be inspected at least annually to ensure integrity of components.

(13)  Lighting.  Special lighting will be placed on the watercraft when used in the performance of public safety activities or when the activity may pose a hazard to the public, e.g. conducting tag-line measurements or towing.  Lighting will meet specifications of 33 CFR 88.12 (red and amber).  The identification light signal must be located so not to interfere with visibility of the vessel's navigation lights.  The identification light signal is used only as an identification signal and conveys no special privilege.

(14)  Hazards to Navigation.  When using a watercraft as a support platform for mission work and where equipment will create hazards to navigation, one or more of the following will be used to ensure employee and public safety:

(a)  The use of a breakaway sounding reel cable kit.

(b)  Provide immediate access to heavy-duty wire cutters capable of severing the suspension cable.

(c)  Deploy strips of brightly colored flagging, hang polyvinyl chloride pipe with brightly colored reflective and glow-in-the-dark tape, suspend orange traffic cone(s) from the cable, or affix battery-powered strobe lights.  Use of referenced attachments should be alternately spaced along the cable to provide adequate visibility to any oncoming boat traffic.

(d)  Equip boat with a permanently mounted electric horn or compressed air horn capable of sounding the danger signal (5 short blasts).

(e)  Station an additional person(s) as observer(s) for oncoming boat traffic.

(15)  Personal Floatation Devices.

(a)  All persons must wear a USGS-approved PFD at all times while on board any watercraft.  If a PFD is worn below deck or in an enclosed space, a manually inflatable PFD is recommended to reduce the potential for entrapment in the event of capsizing.

(b)  Employees and volunteers will wear appropriate PFDs while working on, in, over, or near the water when using watercraft.

(c)  PFDs will be international orange in color or ANSI 107-2010 approved fluorescent yellow-green and equipped with retroreflective tape in accordance with 46 CFR 25.25-15 and 46 CFR 164.018.  See Appendix 31-A, Retroreflective Material for Personal Floatation Devices.

(d)  PFDs must properly fit the wearer.

(e)  PFDs must be inspected by the wearer prior to and after each use.  PFDs that do not meet code or are otherwise defective must promptly be destroyed in a manner that would preclude further use of the PFD.

(f)  PFDs must be inspected as part of the annual watercraft inspection program.

(g)  USGS-approved auto-inflate Type V PFDs have these additional requirements. 

(i)  Auto-inflate Type V PFDs will have a USCG approval number and statement of use on the label.

(ii)  Auto-inflate Type V PFDs will only be allowed when in compliance with the following requirements:

(h)  Detailed Inspection Maintenance Logs will be maintained by the wearer and (or) local Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC) or designee.  At a minimum, maintenance logs will contain the wearer’s name and (or) a unique number assigned to the auto-inflate Type V PFD, date of test, type of test performed, oral or manual test results, disposition of -auto-inflate Type V PFD (if the test failed), and initials of person(s) conducting inspection.

(i)  Wafer-style auto-inflate Type V PFDs will be orally inflated semiannually and mechanically inflated, (submerged underwater) annually, at a minimum. 

(j)  Hydrostatic auto-inflate Type V PFDs will be orally inflated semiannually and mechanically inflated (submerged underwater) every 4 years, at a minimum.  

(k)  Copies of the maintenance log(s) must be made readily available for inspection during safety inspections/audits and (or) upon request by any Safety Manager.  Inspection/maintenance records for all auto-inflate PFDs must be maintained for a period of 4 years.

(l)  Auto-inflate Type V PFDs failing the oral inflation test or the water-activated mechanical test must be removed from service until the manufacturer has inspected the auto-inflate Type V PFD and resolved or corrected the failure issue.

(m)  Warning.  Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations relating to the use of auto-inflate Type V PFDs.  Use another type of USGS-approved PFD if you are a non-swimmer or weak swimmer, small in stature (less than 80 pounds), large in stature (with a chest girth greater than 52 inches), working in ambient conditions less than 40 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF), or in conditions that could result in being subjected to impacts (such as falling or being thrown from a moving watercraft), or will be working in conditions where the buoyancy cell could be punctured or abraded and rendered useless.

(n)  Cold Water PFDs.

(i)  Cold water protective PFDs such as anti-exposure coats, coveralls, or bomber-style jackets, must be provided where operations pose a potential exposure to hypothermia (water temperatures of less than 70 ºF) or in conditions where combined air and water temperatures are less than 100 ºF. 

(ii)  Depending on environmental conditions, donning of this equipment is at the discretion of the watercraft operator. 

(iii)  The watercraft operator is responsible for briefing all passengers in the proper use of the available cold water protective PFDs.

(16)  Float Plan.  A float plan must be completed and provided electronically or in writing to the supervisor or someone knowledgeable of the watercraft operation.  A generic float plan with suggested measures to initiate a search can be found at http://www.floatplancentral.org/download/USCGFloatPlan.pdf.  This generic float plan will be modified to fit individual center needs to include the following elements, at a minimum:

(a)  Considerations for “after-hours” point(s) of contact must be clearly defined in advance of mission work for each float plan filed. 

(b)  Float plan emergency contact information must be reviewed frequently and updated accordingly.

(c)  Elements of the float plan must contain the following information:

(i)  Description of the watercraft.

(ii)  List of the occupants.

(iii)  Point of departure.

(iv)  Emergency equipment on board.

(v)  Planned route.

(vi)  Estimated time of departure.

(vii)  Estimated time of return.

(viii)  Means to contact the boat (e.g., cell phone, satellite phone, VHF radio) and contact schedule, if necessary.

(ix)  Purpose of the trip.

(x)  Description of vehicle(s) left at launch site.

(xi)  Recommended plan of action if overdue, with a primary plan coordinator and a minimum of one back-up person.

B.  Annual Inspection and Maintenance Programs for Watercraft

(1)  Annual inspections and maintenance programs will be established for all watercraft.  These inspections are more complex than a prelaunch inspection and must be performed by a qualified person (see paragraph (3) below).    

(2)  Inspection and maintenance records must be kept for at least 3 years.  Records must be made available for inspection during safety inspections/audits and (or) upon request by any Specialized Watercraft Safety or Occupational Safety and Health Manager.

(3)  Examples of personnel qualified to perform inspections are:

(a)  U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Inspection Services.

(b)  MOCC Instructors.

(c)  Marine certified personnel such as marine mechanics.

(d)  Other qualified persons must be approved by the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager or a Regional Watercraft Safety Program Manager.

(4)  Deficiencies affecting safe watercraft operation will be corrected before the watercraft is returned to service.

(5)  Out-of-service procedures are required to prevent the unauthorized use of watercraft until corrections are made.

C.  Federally owned vessel exemption from State registration. 

(1)  The USGS will comply with State requests to register watercraft for statistical purposes. 

(2)  NOTE: Cooperative Research Units often maintain State-owned watercraft and will comply with State registration requirements.

D.  Exceptions to Watercraft PFD Requirements.

(1)  Exceptions from PFD requirements of this chapter may be permitted for special mission requirements.  A request for exception must be prepared in writing by the local Center Director and submitted to the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager and Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for review and consideration.  The written exception request will identify the extenuating circumstances and alternate safety measures to be taken.  Exceptions will be authorized on a case-by-case basis with concurrence from the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager and approval by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager. 

(2)  Exceptions may be authorized for a period not to exceed 1 year. 

E.  Appropriate Footwear on USGS Watercraft

(1)  Appropriate footwear must be worn when working on watercraft with heavy objects in and around the craft and (or) working on slippery deck conditions.  Examples include handling lead sounding weights (hand or davit deployed), substrate samplers such as grab samplers, portable drill rigs, or metal throw-traps, and construction materials required for gauge/monitor installation and (or) maintenance.

(2)  Appropriate footwear while on watercraft is defined as footwear that provides sufficient traction from slips on wet or slippery surfaces and offers protection to the feet and (or) lower legs from impacts with heavy objects. 

(a)  JHAs will reference any activities onboard a watercraft that would define the appropriate type of footwear required. 

(b)  In situations where heavy objects will be lifted or moved around the deck, appropriate footwear will require steel- or composite-toed safety footwear designed to protect against injury.

(c)  In situations where no heavy objects are being lifted, tennis shoes and boating shoes may be considered appropriate footwear.  

(3)  Open-toed footwear is not authorized for use aboard watercraft.

F.  Training and Certification.

(1)  Operators of watercraft must be properly trained, tested, and certified prior to official operation of any watercraft.  Prior to certification, personnel may practice motorboat operation under the direct supervision of a certified operator on board the watercraft.  Except for training 
and certification purposes, untrained personnel are prohibited from operating USGS watercraft.

(2)  Supervisors must ensure that watercraft operators receive safety and operations training on the specific watercraft, in the environmental conditions that can be reasonably expected and ideally in the area where they will be operating.  Successful completion of the Motorboat Operator Certification Course (MOCC) does not imply that personnel are competent to operate a motorboat in all conditions that they may encounter. 

(3)  Motorboat Operator Instructor Certification Course (MOICC) Training.  MOCC Instructors must successfully complete the MOICC training requirements specified in Appendix 31-B, MOICC Standards.  Personnel successfully completing the MOICC will be authorized to present the MOCC and to certify individuals to operate watercraft.

(4)  Motorboat Operator Certification Course Training. 

(a)  Operators of all motorboats must successfully complete the MOCC training requirements

specified in Appendix 31-C MOCC Standards. 

(b)  Substituted watercraft training for MOCC. 

(i)  Requests for substitution must be submitted for approval by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager, upon review and approval by the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager or Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers.

(ii)  Substituted training must demonstrate that it will meet the MOCC objectives, including on the water proficiency as described in Appendix 31-C. 

(iii)  Examples of acceptable training sources are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers, and Marine Law Enforcement Training Program.

(5)  Special-Use Watercraft Training. Operators of special-use watercraft such as airboats, hovercraft, and jet skis will be required to successfully complete training specific to these crafts in addition to the MOCC training.  Training requirements for operators of airboats are specified in Appendix 31-E, Airboat Operator Certification Course Standards.

(6)  Nonmotorized Watercraft Training.  Operators of Nonmotorized boats are exempt from the MOCC Training requirements.  However, they will comply with the policies and guidance as set forth in Appendix 31-F, Nonmotorized Watercraft.

(7)  While operating a watercraft, MOCC-certified operator(s) will carry a laminated, wallet-sized card showing current MOCC certification with an expiration date.  It will be the responsibility of the MOCC Operator to maintain this card with updated information.

(8)  Recertification.  Motorboat operator certification will be valid for 5 years.  Prior to recertification, operators will complete a refresher course that addresses the minimum subject areas described in Appendix 31-D, Motorboat Operator Refresher Training. 

(9)  First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). 

(a)  All operators, crew, and passengers who operate or work in watercraft will be required to maintain certification in American Red Cross Standard First Aid, or equivalent, and CPR.

(b)  Watercraft operators and crew operating in areas where emergency medical response is determined to be greater than 1 hour away must receive additional training in Advanced First Aid or Wilderness First Aid.  Recertification must be maintained as appropriate.

G.  Report Accidents.

(1)  Report accidents, incidents, and near misses in the Safety Management Information System (SMIS).

(2)  In addition, for accidents involving watercraft, use USCG CG-3865, “Recreational Boating Accident Report,” to report the accident within 48 hours to the State Boating Law Administrator of the State in which the accident occurred. 

(a)  A copy of this form must also be forwarded to the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager within 48 hours of the accident. 

(b)  The report must be made for any accident that results in the loss of life, personal injury which requires medical treatment beyond first aid, complete loss of the vessel, or in which a person disappears from a vessel under circumstances that indicate death or injury

(c)  Report within 10 days other accidents that result in damage to the vessel or to other property in the amount set as a threshold by the State in which the accident occurred. 

(d)  Contact the State Boating Law Administrator of the State in which the accident occurred to verify the threshold for that State.  The Federal threshold for reporting vessel damage is $2,000.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and watercraft safety program criteria.

(2)  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling watercraft safety program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office.

(3)  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the watercraft safety program. 

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure adequate budget and personnel resources for implementation of watercraft safety program requirements.

(2)  Designate individuals as applicable to serve on the Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee.  Representation on the Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee may consist of up to two technical and one management representative for each national scope or regional organization.  All technical representatives must be DOI MOICC certified.  The Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee may also include ex-officio members to address specific subjects as needed.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.  Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish a watercraft safety program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management, and administration of the watercraft safety program.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Designates an individual as the responsible person for all watercraft training and certification activities within the USGS (i.e., Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager).

(2)  Provides approval on substitutions to other watercraft training programs upon review and approval by the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager, Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers, and (or) Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee.

(3)  Provides administrative support to the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager and Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee, as appropriate.

(4)  Provides for the establishment of a Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee that advises the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official through ad hoc membership on the Occupational Safety and Health Council to address and review watercraft issues, to review accidents related to watercraft, and to make recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents.

(5)  Approves exceptions to the safe watercraft operation requirements on a case-by-case basis with concurrence from the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager.

(6)  Provide assistance to Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers and CDSPCs in the establishment and implementation of watercraft safety program requirements and training.

F.  Specialized Safety Programs Section Chief.

(1)  Provide watercraft safety program oversight, administration, budget coordination, and supervision of the Dive Safety Program Manager.

(2)  Collaborates with Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager on watercraft program policies, goals, and annual program plans and accomplishments.

(3)  Serves as the OSH Program Manager designee on the Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee.

(4)  Provides support, oversight, and supervision for the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager.

G. Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager.

(1)  Serves as the technical expert on watercraft safety issues and represents the USGS on watercraft issues requiring coordination with the Department and other bureaus or agencies.

(2)  Serves as the Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee Chair and is responsible for coordinating meetings, agendas, and publishing minutes.

(3)  When appointed, serves as the lead investigator or subject matter expert for watercraft accidents involving serious injury or major property damage.  Reviews all watercraft-related accident reports to identify any trends and makes recommendations to prevent similar accidents in the future.

(4)  Coordinates with the OSH Program Manager to compile a fiscal year watercraft safety program action/accomplishment plan and submit the plan annually to the OSH Program Manager.

(5)  Completes an annual watercraft safety program self-assessment via the Inspection and Abatement System.

(6)  Monitors watercraft operator and instructor training to ensure consistency, accuracy, coverage, and overall quality.

(7)  Maintains watercraft safety program management databases (e.g., training, operator, instructor, and watercraft asset).

(8)  Establishes and coordinates responsibilities with the Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers.

(9)  On a case-by-case basis, concurs with the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for any exceptions to the safe watercraft operation requirements. 

H.  Regional Watercraft Safety Program Managers.

(1)  Serve as liaison to the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager in coordinating the watercraft safety program.

(2)  Assist the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager in providing support and assistance to the field, CDSPCs, and MOICC instructors in establishing and implementing watercraft safety program requirements and training.

(3)  Maintain contact with Regional Safety Managers relative to implementation of the watercraft safety program.

(4)  Maintain contact with Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee members relative to watercraft safety program requirements.

(5)  Assist Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Managers and (or) conduct watercraft safety program inspections or assistance visits in coordination with Regional Watercraft Safety Programs Managers.

I.  Bureau Watercraft Safety Committee.  See SM 308.66 for the membership and responsibilities of the committee.

J.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.  Provide appropriate personnel and budget resources to establish a local watercraft safety program including operator training, periodic inspection and maintenance, personal protective equipment, and other equipment as is necessary for the safe operation of watercraft in all expected conditions.

K.  Watercraft Operators.

(1)  Are responsible for the overall safety of all personnel on board regardless of position and grade, and are responsible for operating the watercraft in compliance with existing policies, guidelines, and training.

(2)  Routinely evaluate weather, environmental, and other conditions.  Look for site-specific hazards.  Abort activity any time unsafe conditions affect an operator’s ability to pilot the watercraft safely. 

(3)  Thoroughly inspect the watercraft and boat trailer components to ensure safety, reliability, and functionality prior to launching for each mission.

(4)  Ensure that effective emergency communications equipment is in good working condition prior to launching for each mission.  Communications equipment (e.g., 2-way radio, cell phone, SPOT will be adequate and reliable for the area(s) of the mission.

(5)  Brief crew members and passengers on the location and use of all emergency equipment on the watercraft, including PFDs.

(6)  Report accidents and near misses in the Safety Management Information System, to the Bureau Watercraft Safety Program Manager, and to the State Boating Law Administrator of the State in which the accident occurred.

(7)  Have absolute final authority over the operation of the watercraft.

I.  Watercraft Crew and Passengers.

(1)  Comply with instructions of the operator.

(2)  Adhere to all watercraft safety regulations.

(3)  Conduct themselves in a reasonable and prudent manner at all times.

Appendix 31-A: Retro Reflective Material for Personal Floatation Devices (PFDs)

 

Appendix 31-B: Motorboat Operator Instructor Certification Course (MOICC) Standards

Appendix 31-C: Motorboat Operator Certification Course (MOCC) Standards

Appendix 31-D: Motorboat Operator Refresher Training

Appendix 31-E: Airboat Operator Certification Course Standards

Appendix 31-F: Nonmotorized Watercraft

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                September 16, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 32

Reserved for future content.

 

 

CHAPTER 33

Contractor Safety and Health

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to address organizational changes, reflect current guidance and responsibilities.

 

1. Purpose.  This chapter outlines specific requirements for employees with responsibility for projects that bring contractor personnel into U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facilities; e.g., laboratories, offices, or field worksites and may expose contractor personnel to hazardous working conditions or materials.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR).

B.  485 DM Chapter 24, Contractor Safety and Health.

C.  Acquisition Operating Procedure, Specifications and Performance Based Statements of Work.

D.  Acquisition Operating Procedure, Purchase Requests.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  Workplace safety applies to all employers as a matter of law and is enforced by the Government as the sovereign through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

B.  Enforcement of workplace safety statutes are not the responsibility of the USGS as a contracting party.  However, the USGS does have an obligation to ensure that contractors and subcontractors perform their duties in a manner that will not endanger the safety and health of USGS employees, volunteers, the public, or themselves as they work in or visit USGS facilities.

C.  The USGS is responsible for ensuring that contractor personnel are made aware of safety issues affecting their work; e.g., work in confined spaces, building-specific conditions such as occupant emergency plans or exposures to potentially hazardous working conditions or hazardous materials.

D.  End users are responsible for notifying the Contracting Officer (CO) of safety factors, issues, or concerns to ensure appropriate source selection criteria and contract language is utilized in the procurement process, contract award and administration.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and contractor safety program criteria;

(2)  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling contractor safety program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office;

(3)  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the contractor safety program.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors. Provide staff and funding support to ensure region, mission area, or office promotion of Contractor Safety Program activities.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official/Associate Director for Administration.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective Contractor Safety Program.

(2)  Assigns Contractor Safety Program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services. Assigns Contractor Safety Program responsibilities to the OSH Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  Bureau and Regional Safety and Health Staff.

(1)  Serve as principal technical experts on safety and occupational health issues, providing subject matter expertise to the CO, Contracting Officer Representative (COR), or Government Inspector, and other employees, as applicable, in developing contractor requirements documents and/or contract language to address USGS building or worksite-specific safety issues such as:

(a)  Lockout/Tagout procedures.

(b)  Unique facility operations, chemicals, and other activities specific in scope to that facility.

(c)  USGS-unique policies that protect the safety, health, and well-being of all persons within USGS owned or leased facilities that affect contracted work.

(d)  The conduct of USGS field operations that affect contracted work.

(2)  Review program compliance with safety and occupational health policies during safety reviews.  Ensure that the CO and COR are notified in writing of any violations noted during these reviews that may affect contractor performance since only the CO can issue a stop work order for imminent danger situations.  A project COR does not have the authority to terminate, for any cause, the contractor’s right to proceed.

(3)  Upon request of the CO, provide contractors and subcontractors with on-site briefings/training concerning safety policies and procedures specific to the USGS that may affect the performance of the contracted work.  This briefing/training will outline possible hazards in the workplace to which contractor personnel might be exposed.  The briefing/training may be part of any post-award orientation requested by the CO, or may also be provided to new or replacement contractor personnel at the request of or upon advance approval of the CO, to avoid unauthorized labor charges or Government-caused delays to performance and delivery schedules.

(4)  Provide advice/assistance developing contractor safety requirements for hazardous operations or chemicals that may impact the safety and health of contractor personnel or performance of contracted work in a USGS owned or leased facility or in field locations.

(5)  Communicates through the CO and COR the following contractor requirements:

(a)  Provide, at their expense, any safety or protective gear contractor personnel may require in performance of the contracted work;

(b) Follow site safety policy so as to not endanger contracting and facility personnel while working on site;

(c)  Prior to any work provide the local contact with a list of hazardous materials, including SDS of materials being brought on site;

(d)  Store and secure hazardous materials safely;

(e)  Immediately report to the USGS site contact and the CR any spills of hazardous materials, hazardous materials exposures, and injuries.

F.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate funding resources are provided to implement Contractor Safety Program activities.

(2)  Ensure that contractor accidents and incidents are reported to the local safety staff and documented within the Department of the Interior (DOI) Safety Management Information System (SMIS), as applicable.  The SMIS entry should clearly note that the data entered is for a contractor employee working in a Government facility or at a Government field site.  The name of the contractor employee should also be identified.

G.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist organizational managers and supervisors in meeting safety and occupational health requirements and development of safety and health procedures specific to USGS unique operations at certain local facilities.

(2)  Perform periodic inspections of contractor worksites on USGS owned or leased facilities to ensure that contractor personnel are not creating hazards that can affect on-site personnel.  Notify local management, the CO, and COR/Government Inspector in writing of any contractor safety violations noted during inspections for OSHA notification, enforcement, and follow-up.

H. Employees.

(1)  Employees who initiate contracts will include in the requirements documents the USGS safety policies and procedures addressing building- or worksite-specific safety issues.  For example, if, in the course of contract performance, contractor personnel are expected to evacuate USGS buildings when a fire alarm activates or participate in USGS conducted on-site practical drills and exercises.

(2)  Employees who oversee contractor performance involving hazardous operations or hazardous chemicals will have adequate training in OSHA standards that pertain to the work being performed. Documentation of an OSHA 10-hour General Industry Outreach class or OSHA 10-hour Construction Industry Outreach class will meet the minimum requirement for the OSHA training, but additional training may be required depending on the location of the work, site conditions, and materials required.

(3)  Employees who oversee contractors will ensure that the requirements documents task the contractor with assigning an on-site Competent Person, who meets applicable certification/licensing standards defined in 29 CFR 1926.32(f), to oversee work activity, as required.

(4)  Employees who oversee contractors will ensure that the requirement documents stipulate that construction, renovation, repairs, or change of occupancy; e.g., office space converted to a laboratory, meet applicable Federal, State, or local codes prior to occupancy.

(5)  Employees who oversee contractors will require the contractor to provide a document or inspection record certifying code compliance, to be retained by each USGS owned or leased facility.  See 29 CFR 1960.34 and SM 445-2-H Chapter 6 Inspections and Abatement, regarding pre-occupancy inspection requirements.

(6)  Employees who draft requirements documents or contract language that may involve workplace safety issues will obtain the advice and counsel of local USGS safety officials for subject matter expertise, where necessary.

(7)  Employees who develop safety requirements to be performed by contractor personnel are responsible for providing accurate and comprehensive information regarding facility and operational hazards to the CO so that appropriate contract language is included in award documents informing prospective contractors of existing site-specific conditions that can affect performance.

(8)  Employees are also responsible for keeping the CO and COR/Government Inspector apprised of any changes in activities or issues that can affect the potential safety and well-being of contractor personnel or require the contractor to adjust its performance to accommodate such changes.  This information should include, but is not limited to, the following:

(a)  The location and existence of potentially hazardous conditions at the job site where contractor personnel may be exposed.

(b)  A list of hazardous substances and safety data sheets found in the USGS workplaces which may affect on-site contractor personnel, as required by OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.1200, Hazard Communication.

(c)  The locations of permit-required confined spaces where contractor personnel might be working and USGS policies concerning entry into these spaces, as required by OSHA standard 29 CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces.

(d)  The existence and location of asbestos-containing material and presumed asbestos-containing material, as required by OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.1001, Asbestos; 29 CFR 1915.1001, Asbestos; and 29 CFR 1926.1101, Asbestos.

(e)  When applicable, provide information about the facility's lockout/tagout procedures and request information regarding the lockout/tagout procedures of the contractor and subcontractors, as required by OSHA standard, 29 CFR 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy.

(f)  When the contractor and/or subcontractor provides services at hazardous-waste sites, communicate information regarding the site emergency response procedures and any potential fire, explosion, health, safety, or other hazards of the hazardous-waste site operation that have been identified, including those identified in the information program, as required by OSHA standards 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, and 29 CFR 1926.65, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response.

I.  Contracting Officer.

(1)  Ensures that award documents address hazardous materials, site conditions, and/or hazardous work that contractor personnel may encounter while working at USGS facilities or field sites.  Contracts for onsite performance not involving contractor personnel exposure to hazardous materials or working conditions should identify and address routine office-related hazards, as applicable.

(2)  Where appropriate, considers historical contractor accident rates in making an award determination.  Prospective contactors with high lost time rates and overall total recordable incident rates (TRIR) above 1 or above the Federal average, based on using the most recent 3-year period be disqualified.  Should a contractor with a high TRIR be considered an explanation for the negative accident history or risk receiving an overall unacceptable rating is required.

(3)  Maintains official communication and notification with the contractor concerning any safety or injury incidence involving contractor personnel.

(4)  Issues a stop work order for imminent danger situations, as applicable.

(5)  Informs OSHA, or other appropriate Federal, State or local officials, of instances where the contractor has been notified to take immediate action to correct serious or imminent dangers.

(6)  Follow the procurement specifications detailed in Specifications and Performance Based Statements of Work.

J.  Contracting Officer Representative/Government Inspector and Employees.

(1)  Keep the CO apprised of any safety or health-related issues that have a direct impact on the oversight and/or performance of contracted work.

(2)  Consult Bureau, regional or local safety staff to obtain assistance in addressing safety and health issues in statements of work.

(3)  Coordinate safety/health briefings, with the advance approval of the CO, when a new contract is awarded involving compliance with USGS unique safety and health requirements.

(4)  Report to the CO and Bureau or regional safety staff, where contractor safety violations are noted, to initiate OSHA enforcement and follow up to correct serious or imminent danger.

(5)  Follow guidance as detailed in Purchase Requests.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Oct 31, 2016
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                  Date
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 34

Off-the-Job Safety And Health

Instruction:  This chapter is revised to address organizational changes and update guidance.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for minimizing the occurrence of employee off-the-job injuries and illnesses.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  Department Manual 485Chapter 26 Off-the-Job Safety and Health.

 

3.  Requirements.  The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) requires on-the-job safety and health awareness to encourage employees to be safe off-the-job.  Examples include the following:

A.  Educating employees through items/activities such as literature, safety meetings, publications, posters, and flyers.

B.  Conducting promotional campaigns, such as seat belt use, distracted driving, home fire prevention, holiday safety, and recreation safety.

C.  Encouraging employees to participate in health and fitness activities.

D.  Promoting off-the-job safety in annual safety month activities.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs off-the-job awareness through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.  Provide staff and funding support to ensure region, mission area, or office promotion of off-the-job awareness.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official. Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage effective off-the-job awareness.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services. Assigns off-the-job awareness responsibility to the OSH Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of off-the-job awareness.

(2)  Ensures the development of the off-the-job awareness policy and programs.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance in implementing off-the-job awareness responsibilities to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of off-the-job awareness.

(2)  Validate, through inspections and external audits that off-the-job awareness is promoted in accordance with policy.

(3)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in promoting off-the-job awareness.

G.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs. Ensure that off-the-job awareness is promoted.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators. Assist managers and supervisors in the implementation of off-the-job awareness.

I.  Employees. Voluntarily participate in off-the-job awareness.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                December 2, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official 

 

 

CHAPTER 35

Public Safety and Health

Instruction: This chapter is revised to address organizational changes and add bloodborne pathogens requirements for Automatic External Defibrillators (AED) teams.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for protecting the visiting public from recognized facility or operational hazards.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  American National Standard Institute A117.1.

B.  36 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1190-1192, Federal Accessibility Standards, Minimum Guidelines and Requirements.

C.  U.S. Geological Survey Manual SM 445-2-H Chapter 25 Occupational Industrial Hygiene – Human Bloodborne Pathogens Protection Program.

D.  Applicable Federal, State, and local regulations.

 

3.  Requirements.  The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will establish a public safety program that minimizes the potential for injury, illness, death, and/or property damage to the public while visiting USGS facilities or in the proximity of USGS operations. At minimum, the program requirements will include:

A.  Inspecting workplaces/facilities for public related hazards.

B.  Planning each job with the public in mind.

C.  Designing, constructing, operating, and maintaining facilities to eliminate or control hazards, with special consideration for the physically impaired.

D.  Planning for the control and protection of the public during potential emergencies inclusive of providing first-aid treatment and assistance in contacting emergency response officials (i.e., 911).

E.  Ensuring that personnel who are designated as “First Responders” receive training in the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.139, Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, USGS 445-2-H requirements, and provide special training, such as hazard recognition, first-aid, and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

F.  Employees at locations with an AED shall ensure that a program is established that complies with state requirements, has oversight of a medical director, and has operating protocols that detail the use and maintenance of equipment, personnel training, drills, program documentation, and/or other requirements, as applicable. A list of the AED team members will be kept by each facility.

G.  Employees who are members of an AED team have the potential for bloodborne pathogen exposure and thus will be covered by the exposure control plan in Appendix 25-5 or an equivalent plan.

H.  Providing educational materials (e.g., instructions, signs, and programs) to alert the public of potential dangers related to USGS facilities and operations.

I.  Investigating and reporting accidents related to the public.

(1)  Complete investigation and documentation of all public accidents, incidents, and fatalities.

(2)  Visitor injuries or fatalities that occur on USGS property will be reported to management and Regional Safety Managers who in turn will report to the Departmental Emergency Reporting System (1-888-581-2610) and the servicing Solicitor’s Office, as applicable.

(3)  Upon concurrence by the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), a Technical Board of Investigation (TBI) will be appointed by the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager within 24 hours.  The TBI will investigate the accident and provide an abstract of the incident and any recommendations that have Bureau-wide application to the Bureau DASHO through the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.  The completed report will remain on file in the Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch.

J.  Participating in and supporting agencies and organizations whose purpose(s) relate to public safety; such as the National Safety Council, the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, and the National Water Safety Congress.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Public Safety and Health Program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that respective region, mission area, or office implements and complies with Public Safety and Health Program requirements.

(2)  Provide staff and funding support to ensure that program requirements are implemented and findings are abated.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective Public Safety and Health Program.

(2)  Assigns Public Safety and Health Program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Assigns Public Safety and Health Program responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for program management and administration.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the Public Safety and Health Program.

(2)  Ensures the development of the Public Safety and Health Program policy.

(3)  Provides guidance and assistance in implementing Public Safety and Health Program requirements to mission area, office, or regional managers and supervisors.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of the Public Safety and Health Program.

(2)  Validate through inspections and external audits that required elements of the Public Safety and Health Program are implemented in accordance with policy and regulations; and track and ensure abatement of findings in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

(3)  Assist management and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in implementing and complying with Public Safety and Health requirements.

G.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Ensure that adequate funding resources are provided to implement elements of the Public Safety and Health Program, when required.

(2)  Inspect workplaces/facilities for public related hazards.

(3)  Plan each job with the public in mind to include protection of the public during potential emergencies.

(4)  Design, construct, operate, and maintain facilities to eliminate or control hazards, with special consideration for the physically impaired.

(5)  Ensure employees are trained in accordance with Section 3.E of this chapter.

(6)  Establish Medical Director Oversight for all locations with AEDs to ensure compliance with state requirements and operating protocols that include the following:

(a)  The use and maintenance of equipment

(b)  Employee training

(c)  Drills

(d)   Program documentation

(e)  A list of the AED team members.  Employees who are members of an endorsed AED team have the potential for exposure to Bloodborne pathogens in the course of their duties.  AED team members will be covered by the exposure control plan in Appendix 25-5 or an equivalent plan.

(7)  Post instructions, signs, and programs to alert the public of potential dangers related to local facilities and operations.

(8)  Investigate and report accidents related to the public in accordance with Section 3.I of this chapter.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Assist managers and supervisors in the implementation of the Public Safety and Health Program.

I.  Employees.  Comply with Public Safety and Health Program requirements and report to their supervisors or Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators any concerns regarding public safety and health.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                               December 5, 2016
_____________________________________               ____________                      
Jose R. Aragon                                                                             Date 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 36

Fire Safety

Instruction:  Chapter 36 is revised to include the new Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard, 29 CFR 1910.39, and to include training and inspection requirements for fire extinguishers.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for protecting Department of the Interior (Department or DOI), U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS), and public property and persons from the adverse effects of fires.

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1910.39 Fire Prevention Plans and Subpart L Fire Protection (1910.155, 1910.156, 1910.157, 1910.158, 1910.159, 1910.160, 1910.161, 1910.162, 1910.163, 1910.164

B.  National Fire Codes (NFPA 1 Uniform Fire Code and NFPA 101 Life Safety Code)

C.  1997 Uniform Building Code.

D.  41 CFR 102-74 Facility Management

 

3.  USGS Requirements.

A.  Establish written fire prevention and protection requirements that:

(1)  Provide for accidental fires and related fire losses to be minimized, if not eliminated.  The written fire prevention and protection plan, which may be included in the Occupant Emergency Plan, should include:

(a)  A list of all major fire hazards, proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials, potential ignition sources and their control, and the type of fire protection equipment necessary to control each major hazard;

(b)  Procedures to control accumulations of flammable and combustible waste materials;

(c)  Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat-producing equipment to prevent the accidental ignition of combustible materials;

(d)  The name or job title of employees responsible for maintaining equipment to prevent or control sources of ignition or fires; and

(e)  The name or job title of employees responsible for the control of fuel source hazards.

(2)  Provide for fires to be promptly detected, reported, controlled, extinguished, and investigated.

(3)  Establish abatement procedures.

(4)  Provide for the safe evacuation of building occupants through the establishment, maintenance, and implementation and annual updating of Occupant Emergency Plans.

(5)  The USGS will abide by the requirements contained in 41 CFR 102-74.  In those General Services Administration (GSA)-leased buildings where USGS is the major tenant, then the USGS will have the responsibility to prepare the required Occupant Emergency Plans.  In those GSA-leased buildings where USGS is not the major tenant or lead agency, USGS will assist the lead agency in completion of the required plan.

(6)  Participate in at least one fire drill per year.

(7)  Keep all exits, accesses to exits and accesses to emergency equipment clear at all times.

(8)  Prohibit hazardous, explosive or combustible materials in buildings unless authorized by appropriate agency officials and by GSA unless protective arrangements determined necessary by GSA have been provided.

(9)  Ensure that all draperies, curtains or other hanging materials are of non-combustible or flame-resistant fabric and that freestanding partitions and space dividers are limited combustible, and their fabric coverings are flame resistant.

B.  Inspection and Testing.

1.  Require fire detection and suppression systems/equipment to be inspected at least annually by qualified persons and maintained in safe operating condition.

(a)  In GSA-leased space, this requirement is part of the lease and is the responsibility of the building owner.

(b)  In USGS space, this requirement is the responsibility of management in charge of the specific facility.

2.  Require portable extinguishers be visually inspected monthly

3.  Require portable fire extinguishers be subjected to an annual maintenance check. Stored pressure extinguishers do not require an internal examination.  Prepare a written record of the annual maintenance date and retain this record for one year after the last entry or the life of the shell, whichever is less.

4.  Require portable extinguishers be hydrostatically tested at the intervals listed in Table L-1 of 29 CFR 1910.157 or whenever they show new evidence of corrosion or mechanical injury. Portable extinguishers are not to be hydrostatically tested

(a)  When the unit has been repaired by soldering, welding, brazing, or use of patching compounds;

(b)  When the cylinder or shell threads are damaged;

(c)  When there is corrosion that has caused pitting, including corrosion under removable name plate assemblies;

(d)  When the extinguisher has been burned in a fire; or

(e)  When a calcium chloride extinguishing agent has been used in a stainless steel shell.

C.  Require preoccupancy and periodic inspections to be performed as covered in the Department of the Interior Part 485 of the Department Manual Chapter 6.

D.  Train personnel in the fire hazards to which they are exposed, those parts of the fire prevention plan necessary for self-protection, the basics of fire prevention, fire extinguisher use, emergency response, and Occupant Emergency Plan procedures.

(1)  Special training will be provided for fire brigade members as necessary to enable them to safely execute their assigned duties. When USGS organizational units elect to assign personnel to a fire brigade, this decision will be coordinated with the Regional Safety Officer and Regional Safety Manager, as applicable.  If such a unit is formed, it will conform to the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.156, Fire Brigades.

(2)  Employees that are expected to use fire extinguishers must be trained in their use upon initial assignment and at least annually.

E.  Use the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Life Safety Code 101 as the minimum criteria for life safety features in occupied USGS space, unless some other more stringent code is applicable.  See SM 445-2-H Appendix 36-1 in this Handbook for a suggested NFPA fire safety code compliance inspection checklist.

F.  Secure the services of a qualified fire protection specialist to evaluate USGS fire prevention and protection program, as needed.

G.  Maintain the following records:

(1)  Acceptance test reports and inspection reports of the fire protection systems/equipment as required by applicable NFPA standards.

(2)  Periodic test reports and inspection reports of fire protection systems/equipment for the last 12 years as required by applicable NFPA standards.

(3)  Manufacturers’ operating instructions for life of fire systems.

(4)  Abatement plans and reports of corrective measures for the last 3 years.

(5)  In GSA-leased space, the subject reports and records will be maintained by the building owner.

(6)  In USGS space, these requirements are the responsibility of management in charge of the specific facility.

Appendix 36-1: NFPA Compliance Inspection Checklist

 

 

Approved:

_________________________________ 
Carol F. Aten 
Chief, Office of Administrative Policy and Services 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 37

Lock Out/Tag Out Program

Instruction:  Chapter 37 is revised to incorporate pertinent provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard.

 

1.  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) lockout/tag-out program.

B.  Written lockout/tag-out procedures must be established for any activity or operation when servicing and/or maintenance operations are performed on a machine or equipment and the unexpected energizing, startup or release of stored energy could occur and cause injury.  In such cases, the machine or equipment must be isolated from the energy source and rendered inoperative. This includes situations that require an individual to remove or bypass a safety device or to place his or her body on a machine or piece of equipment, as well as situations when an associated danger zone exists during a machine operating cycle.

C.  This chapter does not apply to minor tool changes, adjustments, and other minor servicing activities that take place during normal operations, so long as these servicing activities are routine and repetitive, and effective alternative measures are used to guard the machine.

D.  Written lockout/tag-out procedures are not required for work performed on cord and plug connected electrical equipment when the potential hazard is controlled by unplugging the equipment from the energy source, and the plug is under the exclusive control (including visual contact) of the individual performing servicing or maintenance.  Although written procedures are not required, the equipment must be unplugged during servicing or maintenance.

E.  The lockout/tag-out program applies to all USGS personnel, volunteers and contractors performing work on property owned by USGS or occupied by its personnel.  This chapter supplements those requirements established by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), 29 CFR 1910.147.

 

2.  Authorities/References.

A.  29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (lockout/tag-out).

B.  29 CFR 1910.147, Appendix A, Typical Minimal Lockout Procedures.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  Machines, equipment, and instrumentation will be isolated from all potential energy sources before an individual performs any servicing or maintenance activities if the energizing, start-up, or release of stored energy could cause harm to the individual working on the machine or equipment.

(1)  Procedures for locking out or tagging out will be written for each type of machine or equipment.

(2)  All sources of energy (e.g., electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, gravitational, kinetic, etc.) will be identified in the procedures.

(3)  The procedures will include specific steps for shutting down, isolating, blocking and securing machines or equipment to control each form of hazardous energy.  Hazardous energy includes stored energy such as in capacitors and springs.

(4)  The procedures will include specific steps for the placement, removal, and transfer of lockout devices or tagout devices and will designate the responsibility for each step.

(5)  The procedures will include specific requirements for testing a machine or equipment to determine and verify the effectiveness of lockout devices, tagout devices, and other energy control measures.  For instance, a test to determine if an electrical system is at zero energy may be performed with a volt-ohm meter.

B.  Lockout and tag-out will be performed only by individuals designated by their supervisor who are trained to lockout and/or tag-out machines or equipment in order to perform service or maintenance.

C.  Locking devices will be used on systems which are capable of being locked. Tag-out devices are allowed only when the following can be demonstrated:

(1)  The use of locking devices is impractical and entails burdens that exceed any advantage of using lockout over tag-out devices, and

(2)  Full personnel protection can be provided per 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(3).

D.  Training.  All authorized, affected, and incidental personnel will receive training consistent with their level of lockout/tag-out responsibility in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(7).

(1)  An authorized employee, volunteer, or contractor is one who has been designated to perform service or maintenance.  Training for authorized employees and volunteers will include the recognition of applicable hazardous energy sources, the type and magnitude of the energy available in the workplace, and the methods and means necessary for energy isolation and control.

(2)  An affected employee, volunteer, or contractor is one who operates or uses a machine on which servicing is being performed, or one who is required to work in an area in which such servicing is being performed.  Affected individuals will be instructed in the purpose and use of the energy control procedure.

(3)  Incidental employees, volunteers, and contractors are those who may work in an area where energy control procedures are used. These individuals will be instructed about the procedure and the prohibition against restarting or reenergizing machines or equipment which are locked out or tagged out.

(4)  Retraining will be provided for all authorized and affected individuals whenever there is a change in their job assignments; a change in machines, equipment, or processes that present a new hazard; or when there is a change in the energy control procedures. Additional retraining will be conducted whenever a periodic inspection or other evidence reveals that there are inadequacies in the individual’s knowledge or use of the energy control procedures.

(5)  The supervisor will issue a certificate that the training has been accomplished and is being kept up to date.  The certification will contain each individual's name and dates of training.

E.  Individual or group lockout and tag-out application will be in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.147(d).  Release from lockout or tagout procedures will follow the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.147(e).

(1)  An example of group lockout is to place a lock on each energy source.  Place the key for each of these locks into a box.  Place a hasp on the box’s lock.  Then each authorized (exposed) employee places his or her lock on the hasp.  This prevents the box from being opened until the last employee removes his or her lock.

F.  Lockout and tag-out apparatus will be provided by the employer.  Lockout and tag-out devices are to be clearly identifiable and meet the construction specifications of 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(5).

G.  Shift or personnel changes.  To ensure the continuity of lockout or tagout protection when shifts or personnel change, the incoming personnel will place their lock(s) and/or tag(s) on the equipment prior to outgoing personnel removing their lock(s) and/or tag(s).  This should minimize exposure to hazards from the unexpected start-up of the machine or equipment or the release of stored energy.

H.  Periodic Inspection.  A periodic inspection of the energy control procedure will be performed at least annually by an authorized employee other than the ones(s) using the procedure.

(1)  The purpose of the periodic inspection is to correct any deviations or inadequacies identified.  Examples of these are: previously unidentified energy sources; procedures that are not clear; and lockout devices that are worn, broken, or the wrong size or type.

(2)  Where lockout is used for energy control, the periodic inspection will include a review between the inspector and each authorized individual of that individual’s responsibilities under the energy control procedure being inspected.

(3)  Where tag-out is used for energy control, the periodic inspection will include a review between the inspector and each authorized and affected individual, of that individual’s responsibilities under the energy control procedure being inspected, and the elements in 1910.147(c)(7)(ii).

(4)  The authorized inspector will prepare a certificate showing that the periodic inspections have been performed.  The certificate will identify the machine or equipment on which the energy control procedure was being utilized, the date of the inspection, the individuals included in the inspection, and the person performing the inspection.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Promotes the lockout/tag-out program.

(2)  Develops Bureau-level program policy and guidance regarding lockout/tag-out and assists Regional Safety Managers in the development and administration of regional programs, as applicable.

(3)  Assists Regional Safety Managers in coordinating training to meet the requirements of this chapter.

(4)  Provides program oversight and periodically evaluates Regional offices and regional science program center effectiveness, as applicable, providing recommendations to management for program enhancement.

B.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure promotion of the lockout/tag-out program.

(2)  Provide technical guidance on lockout/tag-out procedures and policy to regional safety personnel and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(3)  Assist regional safety personnel and CDSPCs in coordinating employee training requirements.

(4)  Provide regional program oversight and conduct periodic evaluations of regional offices’ and regional science program centers’ lockout/tag-out programs as applicable, to determine effectiveness and to provide management with recommendations for program enhancement.

C.  Regional Safety Personnel.

(1)  Ensure promotion of the lockout/tag-out program.

(2)  Provide technical guidance on lockout/tag-out procedures and policy to regional CDSPCs.

(3)  Assist regional CDSPCs in coordination of training requirements.

(4)  Conduct periodic evaluations of regional field location lockout/tag-out programs as applicable, to determine effectiveness and to provide management with recommendations for program enhancement.

D.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Designate authorized individuals. Ensure authorized individuals possess the skills required for the safe usage of energy control devices.

(2)  Ensure authorized individuals receive information and training, consistent with this chapter and 29 CFR 1910.147(c)(7), and maintain records of all training.

(3)  Ensure all energy control procedures are formally established by a job hazard analysis (JHA), standard operating procedure, or other documentation.

(4)  Ensure that periodic inspections of the lockout procedures are conducted at least annually for each authorized individual.  When tagout procedures are used, the periodic inspection must also include affected individuals.  Ensure that a certification of the inspection is prepared.

E.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(1)  Assist supervisors in the development of an effective lockout/tag-out program for all individuals who perform service or maintenance on equipment or machinery, inclusive of coordinating and tracking employee lockout/tag-out training.

(2)  Assist supervisors in selecting and procuring appropriate lockout/tag-out equipment.

(3)  Conduct periodic self-evaluations of the organizational lockout/tag-out program and provide recommendations for program enhancement to appropriate management and supervisors.

F.  Personnel.  Use safe and prudent work practices, complying with all program elements and training requirements outlined in this chapter.

G.  Contractor Technical Representatives (COTRs).

(1)  Ensure contractor personnel engaged in activities under the scope of this chapter employ lockout/tag-out procedures that meet or exceed those outlined in this chapter and that all work agreements and contracts reference OSHA 1910.147.

(2)  Ensure contractors engaged in activities covered by the scope and of this chapter coordinate their lockout or tag-out procedures with USGS.

 

5.  Additional Resources.

A.  OSHA Technical Link, Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tag-out).

B.  OSHA Lockout/Tagout eTool

C.  OSHA publication 3120 Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout)

 

 

Approved:

s/Karen D. Baker 8/9/05
for Carol F. Aten 
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 38

Blasting Safety

 

38.1  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for the Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) blasting safety requirements.

B.  This chapter covers all USGS personnel who use, transport, or store explosives or blasting materials as recognized by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms or the Department of Transportation (DOT).

C.  This chapter supplements those requirements established for occupational use and storage of explosives by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) (29 CFR 1910.109) and transportation of explosives by DOT (49 CFR 173, Subpart C).

 

38.2  Authorities/References.

A.  29 CFR 1910.109, Explosives and Blasting Agents.

B.  445-1-H Chapter 20, Explosives, USGS Safety and Environmental Health Handbook.

 

38.3  Requirements.

A.  The transporting, handling, storage, and use of explosives, blasting agents, and blasting equipment shall be directed and supervised by a qualified Blast Officer.  The Blast Officer shall be a person knowledgeable and with proven experience and ability in blasting operations.

B.  All personnel who participate in blasting operations shall receive initial training in basic explosives safety.  Individuals shall receive additional training in explosives safety commensurate with their assigned responsibilities.  Refresher training shall be provided every three years for persons who regularly participate in blasting operations.

C.  Prior to the use, storage, or handling of explosives covered under the scope of this chapter, a blasting plan shall be prepared by a competent individual with proven experience and ability in blasting operations.

D.  The blasting plan shall be site specific and shall at minimum address the following:

(1)  Designation of a qualified individual as Blast Officer who has authority over all actions and operations related to blasting.  List the names, qualifications, and detail responsibilities for all personnel involved with the blasting or who will otherwise be responsible for transporting, handling, or storing the explosives.  In addition, list all incidental personnel and other personnel authorized to be within the danger zone during blasting operations.

(2)  Dates and location of blasting.

(3)  Type and quantity of explosives and detonating or initiating devices to be used at the site. In addition, a running inventory of explosives and blasting agents stored at the site shall be maintained.

(4)  Means of transporting explosives and provisions for storing and securing explosives on site.

(5)  Ensure that all applicable permits and licenses have been obtained.

(6)  Minimum acceptable weather and static conditions and considerations for stray radio frequency energy and electrical currents where electrical initiation will be used.

(7)  Standard procedures for handling, setting, wiring, and firing explosive charges.

(8)  List of required PPE.

(9)  Minimum standoff distances/means for clearing/controlling access to blast danger areas.

(10)  Procedures for handling misfires and other unusual occurrences.

(11)  Emergency action plan, including the following:

(a)  Phone numbers of local emergency response organizations (rescue, ambulance, fire department, police).

(b)  Location and phone number of nearest medical services facility.

(c)  Actions to be taken when a person is injured.

(d)  A copy of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each explosive or other hazardous material expected to be used.

(e)  Personnel not listed on the blasting plan shall not be allowed on site without approval of the blast officer.  All personnel shall receive a safety brief prior to entering the blast area. A roster shall be maintained of all personnel within the blast area.

(f)  A copy of the blasting plan shall be maintained at the blasting site(s) and office locations.

 

38.4  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Develops appropriate policy, procedures, and plans and provide Bureau-wide program oversight and direction.

(2)  Conducts periodic evaluations of Regional Headquarters and sampling of regional science programs to determine the effectiveness and degree of blasting program administration and implementation and makes recommendations for improvements as appropriate.

(3)  Develops template products to assist the field in meeting blasting plan and other chapter requirements.

B.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide regional program oversight and direction.

(2)  Provide technical assistance to Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs), supervisors, and managers in identifying, developing, and approving blast safety training programs.

(3)  Conduct reviews of blasting programs during regional science program reviews and inspections to determine the effectiveness and degree of confined space entry program administration and implementation and make recommendations for improvements, as appropriate.

C.  Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Assist regional science program CDSPCs, supervisors and managers in identifying, developing, and approving blast safety training programs.

(2)  Conduct reviews of blasting programs during regional field location program reviews and inspections.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(1)  Assist supervisors and managers in identifying, developing, and approving blast safety training programs.

(2)  Conduct reviews of blasting programs during organizational program reviews and inspections.

E.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Oversee the development of an approved blasting plan by an individual of proven ability and experience in blasting operations that meets the minimum requirements of this chapter.

(2)  Provide training in explosive use for personnel using and handling explosives to include information contained in the blasting plan.

(3)  Provide immediate supervision and direction of an individual of proven ability and experience in blasting operations for personnel that do not have sufficient training and experience to perform explosive work alone.

(4)  Verify that at least two employees on any blasting project are trained in basic first-aid and CPR.

(5)  Verify that any employee required to operate a motor vehicle for the purpose of transporting explosives is qualified and trained.  Should the vehicle be required to be placarded based on the quantity or hazardous nature of its contents, the operator of the vehicle shall have a valid State commercial driver’s license.

F.  Blast Officer.

(1)  Directs and supervises the transport, handling, storage, and use of explosives, blasting agents, and blasting equipment.

(2)  Provides all personnel who participate in blasting operations initial and refresher training in basic explosives safety commensurate with their assigned responsibilities.

(3)  Prepares a blasting plan for the use, storage, or handling of explosives including the elements covered under the scope of this chapter.

(4)  Maintains secure storage and inventory of type/quantity of explosives and detonating or initiating devices used.

(5)  Provides for safe means of transporting explosives and provisions for storing and securing explosives on site.

(6)  Obtains all applicable permits and licenses.

(7)  Assures minimum standoff distances/means for clearing/controlling access to blast danger areas and establishes procedures for handling misfires and other unusual occurrences.

(8)  Develops an emergency action plan for each site operation.

(9)  Provides a safety briefing prior to entering blast area and restrict site access to only personnel listed on the blasting plan.

(10)  Maintains a roster of all personnel within the blast area.

(11)  Maintains a copy of the blasting plan at the blasting site(s) and office locations.

G.  Personnel.

(1)  Adhere to all basic explosives safety procedures and to all additional safety procedures described in the blasting plan.

(2)  Attend required blasting or explosives safety training programs.

(3)  Assist supervisors in developing the blasting plan.

 

38.5  Additional Resources.

A.  Institute of Makers of Explosives, http://www.ime.org/

B.  Hazardous Materials Classification Placards (Explosives), http://klbproductions.com/yogi/hazmat/placards/

C.  Department of Treasury List of Explosives, http://www.atf.treas.gov/pub/fire-explor_pub/listofexp.htm

D.  Public Law 91-452

 

 

CHAPTER 39

Wildlife Netting Safety

 

1.  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) wildlife netting safety requirements.

B.  This chapter applies to all situations involving the use of cannon and rocket net devices used to propel nets and entrap wildlife.

 

2.  Definitions.

A.  Cannon and Rocket Net Devices.  Devices used by agencies to propel nets through the air to quickly entrap various species of wildlife.

B.  Explosives.  An explosive means any substance or article, including a device, which is designed to function by explosion (i.e., an extremely rapid release of gas and heat) or which, by chemical reaction within itself, is able to function in a similar manner even if not designed to function by explosion.

C. Department of Transportation Hazardous Materials (Class 1 - Explosives) Divisions.

(1)  Division 1.1.  Consists of explosives that have a mass explosion hazard.  A mass explosion is one which affects almost the entire load instantaneously.  High explosives possessing a detonating capability such as dynamite, nitroglycerin, picric acid, lead azide, fulminate of mercury, black powder, blasting caps, and primers also known as boosters.

(2)  Division 1.2.  Consists of explosives that have a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard.

(3)  Division 1.3.  Consists of explosives that have a fire hazard and either a minor blast hazard or a minor projection hazard or both, but not a mass explosion hazard.  Low explosives possessing a flammable capability such as propellant explosives, including some smokeless propellants and display fireworks.

(4)  Division 1.4.  Consists of explosives that present a minor explosion hazard.  The explosive effects are largely confined to the package and no projection of fragments of appreciable size or range is to be expected.  An external fire must not cause virtually instantaneous explosion of almost the entire contents of the package.  Includes certain types of manufactured articles containing Class 1.1 or 1.3 explosives, or both, but in restricted quantities such as consumer fireworks.

(5)  Division 1.5.  Consists of very insensitive explosives.  This division is comprised of substances that have a mass explosion hazard but are so insensitive that there is very little probability of initiation or of transition from burning to detonation under normal conditions of transport.  The probability of transition from burning to detonation is greater when large quantities are transported in a vessel.

(6)  Division 1.6.  Consists of extremely insensitive articles that do not have a mass explosive hazard.  This division is comprised of articles which contain only extremely insensitive detonating substances and which demonstrate a negligible probability of accidental initiation or propagation.

(7)  Match.   Detonator for Division 1.3 explosives.

(8)  Squib.  Detonator for Division 1.1 explosives.

D.  Cannon Net Devices.  Large bore cannons that fire a loosely fitting weighted shell with shock cords and line to the perimeter of the net.  Explosives used in these devices are largely Class 1.3 explosives (smokeless powder) and detonated with separately stored electric matches.

E.  Rocket Net Devices.  Newer devices that propel the net directly with a propelled shell and functionally resemble a non-aerodynamic rocket.  They have a blunt nosecone, a hollow tube body, a stabilizing fin (usually a long steel rod counterweight), and exhaust ports in the base.  These devices have, on occasion, been referred to as recoilless cannons, but they are more correctly referred to as rockets because the entire chamber enclosing the explosion is lofted by the detonation of the charge contained within.  These internal combustion rockets are connected to the nets with shock cords and ropes and are propelled by electrically fired Class1.3 explosives.

 

3.  Requirements.  Those personnel involved in the use of cannon or rocket net devices shall follow the procedures in this chapter.  Although the procedures are written to apply to rocket net devices, similar precautions apply to the use of the older projected propulsion systems such as cannons.  Note:  Any directions provided by the manufacturer for the loading of their equipment shall take precedence over the procedures provided herein.

A.  Loading the Rocket.

(1)  Unscrew nozzle from rocket body.

(2)  Remove any debris from inside the rocket body; be certain rocket nozzles are clear of melted plastic and powder residues.

(3)  Insert rocket charge into rocket body.

(4)  Pass lead wire through one of the nozzle holes and take up slack lead wire.

(5)  Replace the nozzle on the rocket body and tighten securely (a minimum of three complete turns).  Threads should be periodically cleaned with a steel brush and greased during storage.

(6)  Inspect connection with net, keeping attachment chord clear of the rocket.

B.  Hook-up to Power Supply and Firing.

(1)  Blasting machines are a preferred power source, but they may not be practical in some situations.

(2)  Connect charges in series with the firing lines after making sure firing lines are disconnected from power supply and shunted.

(3)  Check electrical circuit for continuity with a blasting galvanometer after hook-up is complete.

(4)  Recheck electrical continuity just prior to each trapping attempt.

(5)  Firing is accomplished by completing the circuit to the power source with the firing lines.

C.  Safety Requirements.

(1)  Rockets and rocket charges must be matched to type.  Wildlife Material Incorporated (WMI) type rockets have exhaust ports of 6.35 millimeters (.250 inch) or larger and will be used only with WMI type charges.  Rockets or charges that cannot be identified as to type cannot be used.

(2)  Personnel should never stand or work in front of a rocket during arming or in front of an armed rocket net.  This applies to all testing of circuit continuity, net rearrangement work, etc.

(3)  The crank for the firing source (hellbox) must be carried on the person arming the rocket.  If a blasting machine is used, keep it with you while loading.  This prevents accidental discharge of firing source energies during loading.

(4)  Check all firing-circuit continuity with a blasting galvanometer. Some commercial ohm meters can conceivably fire explosive devices.  Several large explosive companies make explosive circuit galvanometers.  For example, the Atlas Powder Company manufactures a Model No. 2 or equivalent.

(5)  All electrical connections must be of a firm and secure quality.  Never skimp on the quality of electrical connections or firing cables.

(6)  Firing lines will always remain shunted until the area is cleared of personnel. Maintain a shunt at the lead wires of the cartridge and the ends of the firing cable.  Immediately after firing, shunt the ends of the firing cable.  If open (unshunted) lead wires are brushed against synthetic fiber clothing, especially in cold air, residual static electricity could be of such intensity to fire unshunted cartridges.

(7)  Remote-controlled sites shall be at least .80 kilometers (one-half mile) minimum distance from live circuits.  Wattage outputs, climatic conditions, and energy requirements are so variable that it is impossible to establish a safe minimum area.  Consideration must be given to the danger of an accidental radio-frequency-caused firing.  Low-flying aircraft and high-voltage transmission lines under ideal conditions can also emit enough energy to trigger electrical explosive devices.

(8)  In the event of an undetermined misfire, a minimum of 30 minutes will be allowed before proceeding to disarm the rocket.

(9)  Never expose explosive device cartridges to unnecessary heat or abuse.

(10)  Do not handle charges or get in front of an armed trap during an electrical or dust storm.

(11)  Only the number of charges necessary to perform the planned work will be carried to the netting site.

(12)  All charges should be stored in the shunted position with lead wires.

(13)  All Division 1.3 low explosives, blasting agents, detonators, and charges shall be stored in a locked/secure Type 4 magazine/location as prescribed within 27 CFR §555.203.  Additional requirements with regard to physical location, magazine construction, and storage minimums shall be in compliance with §§555.206(a), (b), and (c), 555.210(b), 555.211(b) and 555.213. (See Appendix 39.1.)

(14)  The location of the storage facility should meet the table of distances requirements of 27 CFR §555.219 (see Appendix 39.2) for low explosives

(15)  All charges should be transported following the requirements of 49 CFR 172.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Develops appropriate policy, procedures, and plans and provides Bureau-wide program oversight and direction.

(2)  Conducts periodic evaluations of regional science programs to determine the effectiveness and degree of rocket-netting safety program administration and implementation and make recommendations for improvements, as appropriate.

(3)  Develops template products to assist the field in meeting rocket-netting chapter requirements, as appropriate.

B.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Assist Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs) in identifying, developing, and approving rocket-netting safety training programs.

(2)  Conduct assessments of regional science programs during formal reviews/inspections.

(3)  Provide regional oversight and direction for the rocket-netting safety program.

C.  Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Assist regional science program CDSPCs in identifying, developing, and approving rocket-netting safety training programs.

(2)  Conduct assessments of regional field programs during formal reviews and inspections.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist organizational field-level line supervisors in establishing and implementing rocket-netting safety training programs.

(2)  Conduct assessments of local programs during formal reviews and inspections.

E.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Establish a local rocket-netting program that complies with this chapter’s requirements and includes personnel training to provide persons with the knowledge, skills, and ability to perform rocket-netting operations.

(2)  Provide personnel instruction on the use and handling of explosives.

(3)  Provide immediate supervision and direction of an individual of proven ability and experience in rocket-netting operations for personnel who do not have sufficient training and experience to perform explosive work.

(4)  Verify that personnel performing rocket-netting operations are trained in CPR and first aid.

(5)  Verify that personnel required to operate a motor vehicle for transporting explosives are qualified and trained.  Should the vehicle be required to be placarded based on the quantity or hazardous nature of its contents, the operator of the vehicle shall have a valid State commercial driver’s license.

F.  Personnel.

(1)  Adhere to all basic rocket-netting safety procedures as well as other additional safety procedures described in the explosives and rocket-netting chapter of this Handbook.

(2)  Complete required rocket-netting, blasting, or explosives safety training programs.

 

5.  Additional Resources.

A.  Dill, H. H., A Field Guide to Cannon Net Trapping, U.S. Department of the Interior: Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, 1969, 18 pp.

B.  Grieb, J. R., and M. G. Sheldon, “Radio-controlled firing device for the cannon-net trap,” J. Wildl. Manage, 1956, 20:203-205.

C.  Peterle, T. J., “The cannon projected net trap for capturing sharp-tailed grouse,” Paper presented at 14th Midwest Wild. Conf., Des Moines, Iowa, 1952, 5 pp mimeo.

D.  Sharp, D. E., and J. T. Lokemoen, “A remote-controlled firing device for cannon-net traps,” J. Wildl. Manage, 1980, 44(4):896-898.

E. Code of Federal Regulations Title 27, Part 555 and Title 49, Part 172.

Appendix 39-1: Extractions from Title 27, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55, Subpart K - Storage Requirements

Appendix 39-2: Title 27, Code of Federal Regulations, Subpart K, Part 55.219 (Table of Distances for Storage of Low Explosives) ​​​​​​​

 

 

_/s/___Karen D. Baker__________                                        ___February 19, 2008__
Karen D. Baker                                                                           Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 40

Confined Spaces

Date: 10/2001

 

40.1  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) confined space entry requirements.

B.  This chapter covers USGS personnel and contractors working in any area that is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work, has limited or restricted means for entry or exit, is not designed for continuous employee occupancy, has poor ventilation, could contain or retain a hazardous atmosphere, or could pose an engulfment or entrapment hazard.  Entry into a confined space is defined as placing any part of the face or body into the space.  Common examples of potential confined spaces include stilling wells, sewers, sewer manholes, most sewer inlets and outfalls, some culverts, vaults, tanks, trenches, pits, pipe assemblies, ducts, silos, storage bins, and hoppers.

C.  Where respiratory hazards exist, the requirements of Chapter 18 (Industrial Hygiene) of this Handbook shall also apply.

 

40.2  Authorities/References.

A.  29 CFR 1910.146, Permit Required Confined Spaces, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146.html

B.  29 CFR 1910.146 Appendix A, Permit Required Confined Space Decision Flow Chart, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_A.html

C.  29 CFR 1910.146 Appendix B, Procedures for Atmospheric Testing, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_B.html

D.  29 CFR 1910.146 Appendix D, Sample Permits, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_D.html

40.3  Requirements.

A.  Job hazard analyses (JHA’s) (see Chapter 15 of this Handbook), shall be performed to determine the potential presence of hazardous conditions for tasks requiring entry into a confined space.  After completing the JHA, a determination will be made as to whether or not a permit is required.

B.  If the JHA and applicable air monitoring confirms that the confined space does not contain, or does not have the potential to contain any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm (i.e., no atmospheric hazard, physical stressor, and entrapment or engulfment hazard exists), then a permit is not required and the space shall be classified as a “Non Permit” confined space.

C.  If the JHA results and applicable air monitoring confirm the confined space contains atmospheric hazard or physical stressor, and/or entrapment or engulfment hazards exist, then the confined space shall be classified as a “Permit Required” confined space.

D.  A written Permit Required Confined Space (PRCS) Program will be established for all USGS activities where personnel are performing duties in areas designated a PRCS and shall include all information and guidance necessary to protect personnel from applicable hazards in accordance with 1910.146(d).  In addition to the program plan, each PRCS requires a written entry permit addressing space specific hazards, controls, personnel rosters, etc., per 1910.146(f).

E.  Personnel shall be assigned specific PRCS entry or support positions and shall receive training specific to the assigned position. Assignments include authorized entrant 29 CFR 1910.146(h), attendant 29 CFR 1910.146(i), entry supervisor, 29 CFR 1910.146(j), or rescue service 29 CFR 1910.146(k). Initial training shall be provided and documented per 29 CFR 1910.146(g).

F.  Should an atmospheric hazard exist that can be controlled by continuous forced air ventilation and air monitoring is performed routinely to ensure a nonhazardous atmosphere is maintained, then the confined space does not require individual permitting subject to the conditions of 29 CFR 1910.146(C)(5).  However, a confined space program plan and a standard operating procedure (SOP) covering the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.146(C)(5)(ii) shall be developed for these spaces.

G.  Confined space program plans shall be submitted to the appropriate Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager for review and approval. Upon acceptance of the program plan and completion of employee training, medical surveillance, and respiratory protection requirements, supervisors shall be authorized to approve space specific entry permits for their activities.

H.  Provide employees performing permit required confined space work appropriate medical surveillance examinations prior to duty in a confined space and periodically thereafter as recommended by the consulting physician.

I.  To determine if the space is permit required see CFR 1910.146, OSHA CFR, Appendix A, Permit Required Confined Space Decision Flowchart.

 

40.4  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Conducts periodic evaluations of Regional Headquarters and samples regional science programs to determine the effectiveness and degree of confined space entry program administration and implementation to satisfy all requirements of this chapter and 29 CFR 1910.146, making recommendations for improvements as appropriate.

(2)  Provides technical guidance to Regional Safety Managers on implementation of confined space entry permit programs.

B.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Conduct periodic evaluations of Regional Headquarters and regional science programs to determine the effectiveness and degree of confined space entry program administration and implementation and make recommendations for improvements as appropriate.

(2)  Review all confined space program plans for the Regional Headquarters and regional offices approving subject plans upon their satisfying all requirements of this chapter and CFR 1910.146.

(3)  Provide technical assistance to Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPC’s) on implementation of confined space programs.

(4)  Provide regional program oversight and direction.

C.  Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Review all field location confined space program plans for their respective regional science program, approving subject plans upon their satisfying all requirements of this chapter and 1910.146.

(2)  Provide technical assistance to regional science program field location CDSPC’s on implementation of confined space entry permit programs.

(3)  Conduct periodic evaluations confined space programs throughout the region to determine the effectiveness and degree of program administration and implementation and make recommendations for improvements, as appropriate.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPC’s).

(1)  Coordinate employee and supervisor awareness programs of confined space program requirements as detailed within this chapter.

(2)  Obtain training and identify technical resources to assist supervisors in identification of confined space hazards and in the development and implementation of the organizational confined space entry program, to include personnel medical examinations, training, and respiratory protection program requirements, as applicable.

(3)  Assist supervisors in preparing program plans and coordinating approval through the appropriate Regional Safety Officer or Regional Safety Manager, as applicable.

(4)  Maintain a copy of local confined space program plans.

E.  Organizational Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Provide sufficient resource allocation to establish and maintain a confined space entry permit program consistent with this chapter and 29 CFR 1910.146 for employees working in confined space environments.

(2)  Coordinate accomplishment of JHA’s to determine the presence of hazardous conditions within all confined spaces requiring personnel entry and to determine if the space is permit required.

(3)  Establish and implement a confined space program appropriate to the level of identified hazard within the JHA.

(4)  Assign personnel to specific PRCS entry or support positions and provide training specific to their assigned duties if the JHA indicates the space requires a permit.

(5)  Obtain training appropriate to the scope of the confined space program for which they are responsible.

(6)  Provide employees performing permit required confined space work appropriate medical surveillance examinations prior to duty in a confined space and periodically thereafter as recommended by the consulting physician.

(7)  Maintain records of medical examinations as required to document employee fitness for duty.

F.  Personnel.

(1)  Comply with instructions/training received on the hazards associated with confined space entry.

(2)  Maintain and properly use personal protective equipment.

(3)  Participate in all medical surveillance required under this section or whenever a serious injury is sustained that could impact the individual’s ability to perform under the stresses of working in confined spaces or wearing respiratory protection.

G.  Contracting Technical Representatives (COTR’s).

(1)  Inform the contractor of the PRCS’s and ensure that the contractor complies with the requirements of this chapter and 29 CFR 1910.146.

(2)  Ensure coordination of entry operations when both contractor and USGS personnel are working in or around the same entry permit space.

(3)  Ensure contractors provide a copy of their entry permit program to the appropriate Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator, Regional Safety Officer, or Regional Safety Manager, as applicable, for review. Ensure contractors do not start work until the contractor’s permit entry program has been approved.

 

40.5  Additional Resources.

A.  29 CFR 1910.146, Appendix C, Examples of Permit Required Confined Space Programs, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_C.html

B.  29 CFR 1910.146, Appendix E, Sewer System Entry, http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_E.html

C.  DHHS (NIOSH) Pub. No. 87-113, A Guide to Safety in Confined Spaces, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/pdfs/87-113.pdf

D.  OSHA Interpretations for 29 CFR 1910.146, http://www.Osha-slc.gov/OshDoc/Interp_Std_toc/Interp_TOC_for_1910_0146.html

E.  OSHA Technical Links

F.  Terminology (link not available). Please consider the following like to OSHA (Flow Chart), http://www.osha_slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_0146_APP_A.html

G.  Confined Spaces Technical Advisor (OSHA), http://https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/confined.htm

 Appendix: Confined Space Program for Stilling Wells

Appendix: Certification for Confined Space Entry of Stilling Well

 

 

CHAPTER 41

Cableway Safety

Instruction:  This chapter was revised to address organizational and policy changes. Significant changes include: discontinuing load testing of cableway systems, clarifying fall-protection requirements, use of the Site Information Management System (SIMS) Cableway Management System, and clarifying requirements on the use of aircraft warning markers.

 

1.  Purpose.  This chapter specifies the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program cableway safety requirements.

 

2.  Scope.  

A.  A cableway is defined as any permanent bank-supported aerial conveying system suspended above a waterway for the purpose of making hydrologic measurements.  Cableways typically are classified as either:

(1)  Manned cableways used to traverse a river in a cable car suspended from the main cable to operate measurement equipment.

(2)  Bank-operated cableways positioned on the stream bank that are used to remotely operate cableway-suspended measurement equipment.

B.  This chapter covers all activities and operations involving manned and bank-operated cableways, whether owned or not, if the cableway is used by employees, volunteers, cooperators, and contractors.  The purpose of this policy is to ensure that cableways used by employees are structurally sound, well maintained, and safely used.  The policy describes the levels of cableway inspection, outlines the training requirements of personnel who use cableways and inspect cableways, and defines the planning and review procedures for construction or major rehabilitation of cableways.

 

3.  Authorities and References.

A.  “Stream-Gaging Cableways,” Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 3, Chapter A21.

B.  “Cableway Design Summary,” Appendix II, in “Stream-Gaging Cableways,” Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 3, Chapter A21.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  Cableway Inspection.  Cableways are subject to routine wear, damage, and deterioration from temperature changes, moisture, vandalism, and normal use.  “Normal use” includes the wear and tear from the cable car sheaves rolling back and forth across the main cable, cable car puller gripping the cable, and the finite service life of paint or hot-dip galvanized coatings.  The integrity of the soil supporting the structure and adjoining stream bank may also be threatened by erosion as a result of overland runoff or by flooding.  Because of the threat of erosion, cableways must be carefully monitored on a continuing basis.  All defects must be corrected promptly to ensure that cableways are safe for use.  This includes any cableways not owned by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) but used by employees.  Procedures for inspection and testing shall be implemented as follows:

(1)  Inspection Prior to Use.  Before use, personnel shall perform a visual inspection of the cableway to the extent possible.  A notice must be posted at each field site as a reminder and guide for the visual inspection (Appendix 41-A), in addition to any necessary site-specific information, including date of last inspection and maximum usable stage for manned systems.

(2)  Annual Inspection.

(a)  All cableways shall be inspected annually by “trained” personnel.  Trained personnel are individuals who have successfully completed 20 or more hours of USGS-sponsored courses covering theory, components, construction, and inspection of cableways. Cableway inspections are independent activities.  Cableway inspection may be conducted as part of a field trip for other activities where logistics dictate the necessity.  Cableways failing inspection must not be used until the deficiencies are corrected.  Inspection results are valid for 1 year.

(b)  An inspection sheet, Appendix 41-B, “Stream-gaging Cableways-USGS-Inspection Checklist,” or Appendix 41-C, “Bank-Operated Cableways--USGS-Inspection Checklist,” shall be completed at the time of each annual cableway inspection and submitted to the inspector's supervisor for review.  Deficiencies shall be recorded in the Site Information Management System (SIMS) Cableway Management Interface.  Deficiencies shall be updated every 365 days until corrective action is completed.  SIMS output shall be integrated with the Inspection and Abatement System as appropriate.

B.  Training

(1)  For all employees (USGS or other) who use cableways.  Information on safety practices and on pre-use inspections shall be provided to all employees, volunteers, cooperators, and contractors who use cableways prior to their first cableway use.  This shall include a combination of on-line and on-site training.  The on-line training, Cableway Pre-Use Inspection (UDT), can be accessed through DOI Learn.  On-site training shall be provided to employees by a senior field technician with previous cableway experience.

(2)  For those employees who perform the annual inspection.  A training course entitled “Streamgaging Cableway Principles for Inspectors” is provided for those employees who shall conduct the annual inspections and maintenance.  The course consists of three days of classroom discussions and lectures on the theory, components, construction, and inspection of cableways, including exhibits and photos of actual deficiencies.  The classroom portion is followed by hands-on training conducted in the field at one or more cableway sites where students conduct the inspection procedures.

C.  Cableway Construction and Materials.  Cableways must be constructed properly with the proper materials to ensure the safety of those who use them.  All new construction or substantial rehabilitation of cableways shall meet the criteria contained in "Stream-gaging Cableways," Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 3, Chapter A21.

(1)  Construction Procedures.  The following procedure shall be followed when new cableways are constructed or when existing cableways undergo a major rehabilitation (upgrade or replacement of items such as mass anchors, footings, A-frames, etc.):

(a)  A review of cableway construction or rehabilitation design plans by the Regional Cableway Specialist or other qualified personnel as determined by the Regional Cableway Specialist.

(b)  The design shall include the information specified in the "Cableway Design Summary," Appendix II, in "Stream-gaging Cableways," Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 3, Chapter A21.  Examples include:  sketches of the A-frame or other support structures, A-frame or other support footings, anchorage, and landing platforms; a cross section of the channel from anchor to anchor; and the maximum usable stage.

(c)  All new construction and major rehabilitation projects shall be coordinated with the local cableway specialist, Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator (CDSPC), and (or) the Regional Safety Manager to ensure that all safety aspects of the project have been adequately addressed.

(d)  Following construction, Science Center management shall provide a letter to the Regional Cableway Specialist, with copies to the Regional Safety Manager or Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch National Programs Safety staff, as applicable, confirming construction in accordance with approved plans and verifying that the installation was inspected by a trained Cableway Inspector.

(2)  Cable Requirements.  The main cable and backstay cables on cableways shall consist of wire rope or structural strand.  Structural strand may also be called tram or tramway cable.  The preferred cable for most USGS applications is 6x19 classifications Independent Wire Rope Core.  Fiber-core cables shall not be installed on USGS manned cableways or bank-operated systems.  Fiber-core cables may collect and hold moisture, which may cause internal corrosion and early failure.  Fiber-core cables are to be replaced on existing cableways as time and resources allow.

(3)  Cable Car Requirements.

(a)  Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) cable cars.

(i)  HIF sit-down cable cars.  A HIF reinforcing kit (part number 2602010) must be installed on all HIF sit-down cable cars manufactured prior to September 2007.  The reinforced cable car can be modified per HIF specifications to accommodate sediment and other water-quality samplers.  

(ii)  HIF stand-up cable cars.  A HIF reinforcing kit (part number 2601030) must be installed on all HIF stand-up cable cars manufactured prior to September 2007.  The reinforced stand-up cable car can be modified per HIF specifications to accommodate sediment and other water-quality samplers.  

(b)  Non-HIF Cable Cars.

(i)  Non-HIF cable cars need to meet a minimum load carrying capacity of 2,250 pounds or be replaced with HIF cable cars.

(ii)  If a non-HIF cable car is in use, the Regional Cableway Specialist must be consulted so that a determination can be made whether a non-HIF cable car design can safely carry 2,250 pounds.

(iii)  Some cable cars carry additional weight that results from the use of batteries, electrical reels, special sampling equipment, etc.  The Regional Cableway Specialist must be consulted to evaluate and document the capability of any cable car in order to carry a load greater than 2,250 pounds.

(4)  A-Frame and Platform Requirements.  All A-Frame towers and platforms must conform to the construction standards specified in “Stream-gaging Cableways," Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 3, Chapter A21.  In addition, ladders and platform railings must conform to SM 445-2-H.44 Fall Protection.

(a)  Fixed ladders that are more than 20 feet long must have landing platforms, ladder safety devices, or cages.  Bolt steps are permitted, but distances greater than 20 feet must have a ladder safety device in place.

(b)  Platform railings shall consist of a top rail, intermediate rail, and posts.  The height of the top railing must be 42 inches.  The top rail shall be smooth surfaced.  The ends of the rails shall not overhang the terminal posts except where the overhang does not make a projection hazard.  The railing shall be capable of withstanding a force of at least 200 pounds applied within 2 inches of the top edge, in any outward or downward direction, at any point along the top edge.

(5)  Marking.

(a)  Determine if cableways must be retrofitted with aircraft warning markers.  This applies to all cableways, not just cableways that require markers due to Federal Aviation Administration requirements.

(b)  The factors listed below shall be considered when determining whether cableways must have warning markers.

(i)  Length of cable span.

(ii)  Height of cable above water surface.

(iii)  Presence of A-frames or supporting structures that are concealed or obscured.

(iv)  Scenic river reach, sightseeing area, and possible search-and-rescue activity.

(v)  Area of military training or activity.

(vi)  Area with logging or oil and gas operations.

(vii)  Area of activity for scientific studies.

(c)  For technical information and specifications for warning marker installation, contact a Regional Cableway Specialist.

D.  Cableway Measurements.  When conducting cableway measurements, all employees, volunteers, cooperators, and contractors must wear a United States Coast Guard (USCG)-approved personal flotation device (PFD) as described in SM 445-2-H.26 Personal Protective Equipment.  Depending on the air and water temperatures, a float coat or survival suit for protection against hypothermia is required.  If the protective clothing serves as a USCG-approved Type III or Type V PFD, a separate flotation device need not be worn.  Employees, volunteers, cooperators, and contractors shall use a cableway measurement unless a cableway inspector has inspected and approved the cableway in the past 12 months (365 days).  Additionally a cableway shall not be used for any purpose unless a pre-use visual inspection has been completed to the extent possible.  Breakaway devices on the sounding reels are required and users shall carry cable shears to cut the sounding cable in an emergency.

E.  Replacement of Cableways.  If an existing cableway can be replaced by a bank-operated system or another means of streamflow measurement, replacement must be considered.  Replacement cannot be bi-passed in order to extend the use of a cableway that does not pass the manned cableway inspection.

(1)  Locked Out of Service.  The cable car must be locked in place using a sturdy lock that cannot be opened with the standard 2640 key.  Keys to the lock shall be secured in the appropriate office until it is determined that the cableway is safe to use.

(2)  Tagged Out.  A sign stating that the cableway has been "Removed from Service" shall be placed on the cableway in plain view.

(3)  A cableway that is no longer intended for use shall have the cable car immediately removed and permanent dismantling plans developed and documented.  In addition, annual inspections shall continue to be performed and documented until the site is either permanently dismantled or put back in service.

(4)  Plans to demolish and remove cableways shall include the following:

(a)  If the property owner is not known, perform deed research to determine ownership and contact the property owner to obtain access permission. 

(b)  If access is approved, obtain the necessary permits.  If access is not approved or the owner does not respond, contact the Science Center management.

(c)  Perform traffic control if near public roadways.

(d)  Protect vegetation, including trees, to the extent possible.

(e)  Remove the cable car; fencing, if applicable; aircraft markers and provide notifications as required; main cable and backstays, if applicable; A-frame or other supporting structure; attaching hardware (U-bars, Eyebolt, etc.).  Either remove or bury concrete anchors no less than 2 feet under grade.  Fill and compact with natural materials to industry standards.  Remove footing, including attaching hardware, and fill and compact with natural materials to industry standards.

(f)  Dispose of materials based on local, state, and Federal directives.

(g)  Clear site, remove debris, and match land as close as possible to surroundings. 

(h)  If concrete removal requires drilling and blasting, ensure that appropriate licensing and permit and (or) certification are obtained.

(i)  Document completion, including before-and-after photographs, with date and time stamps.  At a minimum, there shall be three different views with sufficient detail to see the entire work location.  

(j)  Document that materials were removed and delivered to an approved disposal site.

(k)  All cableways to be removed need to be entered in the Discontinued Station - Capital Improvement Program.

(l)  Consult the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Handbook to determine and assess environmental impact(s) during the initial project planning stage to determine the best course of action to meet the purpose and need of the project.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs cableway safety program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors

(1)  Appoint and ensure appropriate training and funding of at least one Regional Cableway Specialist to review design plans, provide cableway assistance, and inspect cableways for organizations having cableway structures and (or) operations.

(2)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with cableway safety program requirements.

(3)  Ensure that cableway deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective cableway safety program.

(2)  Assigns authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Supervises the Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager and provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management, and administration of the cableway safety program.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides cableway program oversight and direction.

(2)  Monitors the cableway inspection process in conjunction with program evaluations.

F.  Regional Cableway Specialists.

(1)  Review and approve cableway construction and rehabilitation design plans.

(2)  Serve as consultants to field organizations for cableway construction or major rehabilitation and to review new cableway construction design.

(3)  Maintain design plans, etc.

(4)  Conduct Cableway Inspector courses in each region annually or as needed.

G.  Cableway Inspectors.

(1)  Complete formal class instruction on cableway technology in accordance with 41.4.B(2)(a) and have field experience in the operation of stream gaging cableways before taking on the role of cableway inspector. 

(2)  Conduct annual cableway system inspections.

(3)  Document findings on the standard USGS inspection form and provide any supplemental information and photographs as site conditions might dictate.

(4)  Submit the completed inspection form in a timely manner so findings can be used to report the safety status of cableways.

(5)  Communicate any findings or uncertainties observed during the inspection that might indicate an unsafe cableway system requiring immediate attention.  The process would typically involve communication with one or more cableway specialty and safety staff, as well as management staff closely involved with local operations.  Staff might include the local cableway specialist, local safety officer, local field office supervisor, and data chief.  The Regional Cableway Specialist and Regional Safety Manager may also be sought for advice.

H.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Monitor the regional cableway inspection process.

(2)  Review regional cableway inspections to assure accomplishment of appropriate abatement actions and brief the Regional Director on open deficiencies, as appropriate.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Monitor the local cableway inspection process and record annual inspection results using the criteria listed in Appendix 41-D.

(2)  Maintain and track the status of all cableway inspections and abatement actions in the SIMS Cableway Management System.

J.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Oversee the conduct of cableway inspections and documentation annually using Appendices 41-B and 41-C.  Ensure that annual inspection results (Appendix 41-D) are entered in SIMS prior to October 31 each year.

(2)  Comply with standards set forth in SM 445-2-H.27 that pertain to cableways, inclusive of height and proximity to airports and cableway marking.

(3)  Comply with standards set forth in SM 445-2-H.44 of this handbook that pertain to fall protection while working on cableways.

(4)  Track deficiencies until abated as described in 41.4.A(2)(b).  

(5)  Review organizational open deficiencies or management action plans periodically and establish appropriate corrective action plans inclusive of costs for abating open deficiencies or for rehabilitating cableways suspended from use in conjunction with the CDSPC.

 

6.  Additional Resources.

Appendix 41-A: Cableway Visual Inspection Checklist.

 

Appendix 41-B: Stream-Gaging Cableways, USGS-Inspection Checklist

Appendix 41-C: Bank-Operated Cableways, USGS-Inspection Checklist

 

Appendix 41-D: Annual Inspection Designations

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              October 11, 2016
_________________________________                                          _____________________
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                   Date
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 42

Electrofishing Safety

 

1.  Purpose:  This chapter is modified to specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health requirements and procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) electrofishing operations.  This chapter provides guidelines for the safe construction, modification, and operation of electrofishing equipment.

 

2.  Scope. The provisions of this chapter apply to all USGS activities using electricity to collect samples of animals in aquatic habitats.

 

3.  Background.

A.  Hazards Training.  All USGS personnel serving as electrofishing Team Leaders will demonstrate knowledge of the principles and techniques of electrofishing by: (1) satisfactory completion of a National Conservation Training Center course; (2) an equivalent course as detailed in the Training and Education Requirements Section (Section 6) of this chapter; or (3) a course approved by the Regional Safety Manager.

B.  Currents and Wave Forms.  Different types of electrical current produce different electrical current shapes or wave forms.  Alternating current (AC) produces a wave form that consists of a sequence of positive and negative waves that are equal (usually sinusoidal) and follow each other alternately at regular time intervals.  Direct current (DC) produces a unidirectional, constant electrical current.  Pulsed direct current (PDC), a modified direct current, produces a unidirectional electrical current composed of a sequence of cyclic impulses.

C.  Responses of Fish.  The responses of fish to electricity are determined mainly by the type of electrical current in use and its associated wave form.  These responses include avoidance, electrotaxis (forced swimming), electrotetanus (muscle contraction), electronarcosis (muscle relaxation or stunning), or death.  Forced swimming without orientation relative to the electrical current (oscillotaxis) is a typical fish response to alternating current.  AC can be damaging to fish, resulting in hemorrhaged tissue, ruptured swim bladders, or fractured vertebrae.  These conditions are due to severe electrotetanus caused by the alternating polarity of AC. DC forces fish to swim with orientation toward the anode (galvanotaxis).  The modified PDC can sustain galvanotaxis longer than unmodified DC, and with less likelihood of damage to the fish than unmodified DC or AC.  Water conductivity also influences the response of the fish to the electrical field and is the single most important limiting factor in the effectiveness of electrofishing.

 

4.  Authorities and References.

A.  29 CFR 1910, General Industry Standards.

B.  Federal Boat Safety Act of 1971, as amended (46 U.S.C. 1451-89).

C.  National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70-2004, National Electric Code (NEC).

D.  DOI DM 485, Chapter 22, Watercraft Safety.

E.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Occupational Safety and Health, Part 241 FW 3, 6, and 8, Release No. 442, March 19, 2004.

 

5.  Definitions.

A.  Alternating Current (AC).  Typically, a sinusoidal waveform with reversing electrode polarity.  The electrodes alternate between acting as an anode or cathode at a waveform frequency in hertz or cycles per second.  The direction of flow is reversed at frequent intervals, usually 120 times per second (60 cycles per second or 60 Hertz).

B.  Anode.  The positive electrode for direct current (DC) or pulsed DC system.

C.  Bonding.  The permanent joining of metallic parts to form an electrical conductive path that assures electrical continuity, with the capacity to safely conduct current.

D.  Branch Circuit.  The circuit conductors between the final overcurrent device protecting the circuit and the electrical load(s).

E.  Case Neutral.  An electrical connection between the generator windings and the generator case (generator exterior).

F.  Cathode.  The negative electrode for DC or pulsed DC systems.

G.  Circuit Breaker.  A device that monitors the current and automatically opens the circuit when an overcurrent occurs.

H.  Conductor.  A device (wire, SO cable, SJ cable, etc.) that transmits an electric charge. A conductor is also a wire or combination of wires not insulated from one another, suitable for carrying electric current.

I.  Deadman Switch.  A switch that is “normally open” and requires constant pressure to supply electrical current to the circuit.

J.  Direct Current (DC).  An electrical waveform that exhibits relatively constant or continuous current with no reversing electrode polarity.  DC is the unidirectional flow or movement of electric charge carriers (usually electrons).

K.  Electrofishing.  The use of electricity in water to capture or control fish or other aquatic organisms.

L.  Electrofishing Team Leader.  The onsite individual in charge of the electrofishing operation.

M.  Emergency Stop Switch.  A switch that shuts off system power when pressure is applied.  Activating an emergency stop switch is facilitated by "mushroom" or "slap-switch" style configurations.

N.  Ground.  A conducting connection, whether intentional or accidental, between an electrical circuit or equipment and the earth, or to some conducting body that serves in place of the earth.

O.  Isolation Transformer.  A transformer inserted into a system to separate one section of the system from undesired influences from other sections.

P.  Netter.  The individual who nets the fish or other aquatic organisms during electrofishing operations.

Q.  Power Control Circuit.  The circuit that interconnects and adjusts the power from the pulsator or generator to the electrodes.

R.  Pulsator (control box).  The device used to modify the pulsed electric current delivered from the power source.

S.  Pulsed Direct Current.  An electrical waveform created by making regular interruptions in a continuous DC waveform.

T.  Watertight.  Constructed so that moisture will not enter the enclosure.

U.  Weatherproof.  Constructed or protected so that exposure to the weather will not interfere with safe operation.

 

6.  Training and Education Requirements.

A.  The Team Leader in each electrofishing field crew must initially complete the National Conservation Training Center Electrofishing Course (FIS2201) or the Electrofishing by Correspondence Course (FIS2C01) to satisfy certification competency for factors (1-5) below:

(1)  Basic principles of electricity and the generation of electrical fields in water.

(2)  Basic concept and design guidelines for electrofishing equipment.

(3)  Capabilities, limitations, and safety features of electrofishing equipment.

(4)  Safety precautions to employ while using electrofishing equipment.

(5)  Awareness of methods to reduce fish trauma due to electrofishing.

B.  Team Leader refresher training is required every 5 years and can be met via completion of any one of the courses listed below:

(1)  The National Conservation Training Center Electrofishing Course (FIS2201).

(2)  The National Conservation Training Center Electrofishing by Correspondence Course (FIS2C01).

(3)  A course, approved by the respective Regional Safety Manager, that covers the principles and techniques of electrofishing that is at minimum of 16 hours in length and covers items 6A (1-5).

C.  In addition to the training listed in Parts A and B above, all Team Leaders shall maintain current certification in First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).

D.  Since a minimum of two members of an electrofishing team must hold current certification in CPR and First Aid, the Team Leader shall validate that at least one other crew member has current certification in First Aid and CPR, prior to every electrofishing operation.  Refer to USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 14, “Safety and Health Training,” for a description of field hazard safety training that applies to sampling locations more than 15 minutes from professional medical services.

E.  The Team Leader will train or verify all electrofishing crew members have been trained on the following:

(1)  Overview and safe operation of electrofishing equipment components and procedures.

(2)  Hazards involved in electrofishing.  All persons must be aware of the hazards involved in using portable electro shockers in running waters.  These hazards include slippery surfaces, swiftly running currents, areas of deep water, and obstacles such as logs or similar objects.  Additional hazards (depending on the region) include snakes and wasps in tree branches overhanging the water.

(3)  Basic emergency procedures for incidents involving drowning, unconsciousness, and electrical shock.

(4)  Defensive driving techniques, including towing and backing of boat trailers and safe boating operations if an electrofishing boat is used.

(5)  Additional information specific to the local operation.

F.  Operators of electrofishing boats must have successfully completed the DOI Motorboat Operator Certification Course certification and maintain current certification.  Refer to USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 31, “Watercraft Safety,” for subject training requirements.  Under no circumstances will an employee perform electrofishing operations while alone in a stream.

G.  Training requirements as detailed in 6A, 6B, and 6C above can be satisfied by a Team Leader or crew member that is performing these duties as an employee of another Bureau, state agency, or scientific institution.

 

7.  Electrofishing Specifications.

A.  Electrofishing Boat Specifications.

(1)  Design

(a)  Boat design and equipment must be in compliance with U. S. Coast Guard, State, and DOI regulations.

(b)  The boat bow deck will be painted with a nonslip or skid-resistant coating or roughened in some manner to lower the possibility of slipping.

(c)  Anodes will be mounted in a fixed position during operation.

(2)  Clear Working Space.  General boat housekeeping must provide adequate working space to conduct safe operations.  Care will be exercised to prevent clutter that may result in safety hazards.

(3)  Boat Inspection.  The boat and equipment will be visually inspected for safety by the supervisor or operator in charge prior to each use.  Significant deficiencies, which could result in employee injury, will be corrected prior to operation or use of the equipment.

(4)  Controls for Electrical Equipment.

(a)  The boat operator must have ready access to an on/off switch, emergency stop, or deadman switch to cut the power in case of an accident.

(b)  A minimum of one netter on the bow work deck will have a deadman switch connected to the power control circuit.

(5)  Grounding/Bonding.  All metal surfaces within a boat will be electrically connected, grounded, and bonded to the boat hull to eliminate differences in electrical potential that may result in electric shock.  The metal boat hull may also be used as a cathode.  Zinc strips should be attached to the hull as "sacrificial anodes" to avoid possible electrolysis problems when the metal hull is being used as a cathode.  The electrolysis will occur on the zinc strips to preserve the integrity of the hull.

(6)  Battery Enclosure.  An acid proof, nonmetallic enclosure and holder will be provided for wet cell batteries.

(7)  Conductor Protection.  All conductors will be enclosed in watertight, flexible or rigid conduits.  Appropriately rated, heavy-duty insulated cables can be used where external connections are necessary, e.g., to the booms, pulsator, or deadman switch.  All conductors installed in a common raceway (conduit) must be continuous (without connectors, breaks, or splicing) and independently and correctly insulated.  All low voltage (24 volts or less) circuit conductors will be in 300 VRMS minimum cable if contained in the same conduit as the high voltage conductors.

(8)  Lighting.

(a)  Lighting and other auxiliary circuits should not exceed 24 volts.  However, 110 volt lamps may be used if the lamp is shielded with a protective housing.

(b)  When the boat is operated at night, adequate onboard lighting (12-24 volts) will be provided for working areas.

(c)  Adequate lighting will be provided during electrofishing operations to avoid safety hazards such as striking logs, rocks, and overhead tree branches.

(9)  Safety Rails.  Safety rails will be provided around the outside of the netting area and will be at least 105 centimeters (42 inches) high, and constructed of at least 1.8 centimeters (3/4-inch) heavy-wall steel pipe or 3.75 centimeters (1-1/2-inch) heavy-wall aluminum pipe.  Rails will be designed to withstand a 90 kilogram (200-pound) side thrust.  The work deck will be covered with nonskid material and sloped to allow drainage.  The high gunnels of wooden draft boats are satisfactory as safety rails.

(10)  Fire Extinguishers.  Each boat will be equipped with at least one 2.25 kilogram (5-pound) ABC fire extinguisher mounted in a holder for easy boat operator access and away from gas cans, generators, or other fire sources.

(11)  Refueling.  Portable fuel tanks must be removed from the boat for refilling.

(12)  Standard Safety Equipment.

(a)  As a minimum, all crew members aboard electrofishing boats will wear boots that are at least knee-high, with non-skid type soles, and constructed of a material that will insulate the wearer from electrical shock.  Chest or hip waders are recommended and can offer an extra margin of safety in case the boat is not properly grounded.

(b)  All field personnel engaged in electrofishing who are not aboard a boat will wear chest or hip waders to insulate the wearer from electrical shock.  Suitable waders are generally constructed of neoprene, PVC, silicon, etc.  Breathable, lightweight waders may not have adequate electrical insulating properties.  All footwear will be equipped with non-slip soles.

(c)  All persons will wear U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation devices (Type III minimum) when working near, on, in, or over water, except in those cases where an approved site-specific job hazard analysis defines the conditions for an exemption. (See USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 15, “Job Hazard Analyses.)  This requirement applies to all types of electrofishing equipment [see 7.S.(1)].

B.  Electrical Equipment Specifications and Operation (General).  Only commercially built electrofishing equipment that has been approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory may be used.  Homemade electrofishing gear should never be used to collect fish.

(1)  Case Neutral Removal.  Alternating current (AC) voltage from the generator will be isolated from the ground either by removing the neutral connection from within the generator or by incorporating an isolation transformer.  (Warning: A generator with the case neutral removed cannot be used for land-based, nonelectrofishing operations unless the case neutral is reconnected.)

(2)  Conductor Voltage.  Insulation of the conductors within an electrofishing system must accommodate RMS voltages generated by the power source and pulsator without breakdown.  For equipment that generates a maximum of 1,000 VRMS, conductor insulation rated at 600 VRMS is sufficient.  For systems that generate a maximum of 300 VRMS, conductors with insulation rated at 300 VRMS may be used.

(3)  Conductor Size.  Conductor size (current-carrying wire) will be approved for rated RMS amperage of equipment as follows:

Maximum Amperage Minimum Conductor Size
10 16 AWG
15 14 AWG
20 12 AWG
30 10 AWG

AWG = American Wire Gauge

 

(4)  Conductor Placement.  All conductors will be enclosed in watertight, rigid or flexible conduits or appropriate heavy-duty rubber insulated cables.

(5)  Connections.  All equipment must be turned off before making any connections, replacing parts, or performing repairs.

(6)  When using conduit, splices in wiring are only permitted in condulets or junction boxes.  If connections are necessary, the rating of the connector must be the same or greater than the wire.

(7)  Connectors used in association with flexible cables will be of the locking, watertight type.  The connection to the generator should be protected by a splash cover, e.g., a rubber hood.

(8)  All conduit and junction boxes must be weatherproof.

C.  Circuit Breakers.

(1)  The electrofishing system, e.g., generator, pulsator, or console, will include circuit breakers or fuses to provide circuit protection.

(2)  If external to the generator or pulsator, circuit breakers or fuses used for providing branch circuit protection should be labeled as to purpose.

(3)  An on/off switch must be readily available on the generator power source and pulsator.  It is recommended that either the pulsator or generator be equipped with a mushroom, push-button, or slap style emergency stop switch to speed system shutdown.

(4)  It is recommended that amperage and voltage meters be installed to monitor power delivered to the electrodes.

(5)  Power control (safety) circuits will be low voltage and not exceed 24 volts.

(6)  The netter will have a deadman switch connected to the power control circuit from the pulsator or generator source.  This allows the current between the electrodes to be broken in case of an accident.

(7)  An audible or visual signal is recommended to alert a worker when the equipment is in operation.

(8)  An immersion switch is recommended to turn the unit off in case the backpack is submerged in water, regardless of whether entry is vertical or tilted.

(9)  An emersion switch is recommended to inactivate the probe when it is removed from the water.  This reduces the chance of shocking a co-worker with the wand.

(10)  The operator will have a switch to the pulsator or power control unit so that the electricity can be turned off quickly in case of an emergency.

(11)  All purchased equipment must have a tilt switch to break the circuit in case the operator falls.  The switch must be a type that has to be manually reset after the operator has regained his/her footing.

D.  Batteries.  Batteries should be non-spillable, gel-cell batteries.  Terminals should be clean with no visible cracks or holes in the casing or wiring insulation

E.  Gloves.

(1)  All team members will wear rubber gloves of sufficient length to isolate hands from external surfaces.  Never touch both electrodes simultaneously while power source is running.  The following are dielectric strengths (volts per mil thickness) of four materials per ASTM method D-14975:

Neoprene 600 volts/mil
Polyurethane 330 volts/mil
PVC 250 volts/mil
Silicone 100 volts/mil

 

(2)  Note that when a range of voltages was listed by ASTM, the lowest voltage per millimeter (mil) thickness was used.  In addition, without periodic testing with specialized equipment, you cannot be sure of the dielectric strength of your gloves.

(3)  Electrical protective equipment must be capable of withstanding the AC proof-test voltage specified in 29 CFR 1910.137 Table I-2 or the DC proof-test voltage specified in Table I-3 of the same standard.

(4)  Insulating gloves and boots will be visually inspected before each use and will be replaced if any of the following defects are evident: a hole, tear, puncture, or cut; ozone cutting or ozone checking (the cutting action produced by ozone on rubber under mechanical stress into a series of interlacing cracks); an embedded foreign object; any of the following texture changes: swelling, softening, hardening, or becoming sticky or inelastic; any other defect that damages the insulating properties.

F.  Polarized Sunglasses.  Plastic polarized sunglasses should be worn when there is glare.

G.  Net Handles.  Net handles will be constructed of a nonconductive material (fiberglass, polyvinyl chloride tubing, or nylon) and will be of sufficient length to avoid hand contact with the water.  Metal or aluminum dip nets will not be used.

H.  Noise.

(1)  When crew members are subjected to sound levels exceeding those listed in the following table, the crew members must be included in a Hearing Conservation Program.  This program is required by OSHA's Occupational Noise Exposure Standard, 29 CFR 1910.95.  The program includes topics such as hearing protection, annual training, and annual audiograms.

Duration Per Day (Hours) Sound Level dBA Slow Response
8 85
6 87
4 90
3 92
2 95
1.5 97
1 100
0.5110 105
0.25 or less 110

The Hearing Protection Program is detailed further in USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 19, “Industrial Hygiene – Hearing Conservation Program.”  The purchase of nonmetallic two-way communication headphones is authorized.  To be effective, this type of headphone will reduce generator and motor noise significantly and provide clear communication between the netter and the equipment operator.  The use of earplugs and hand signals, agreed upon by the entire crew, are also available for work in noisy environments.

I.  Exhaust from Power Source.  The exhaust from gasoline powered engines will be directed away from the equipment operator.  Exposed hot pipes will be enclosed in protective screening to reduce the potential of burn exposure to crew members.  The use of galvanized pipe for exhaust is discouraged due to the potential release of toxic gases produced under extreme heating conditions.

J.  Gasoline and Refueling.

(1)  Gasoline will be stored and transported in approved containers designed for fuel storage. The container must be approval by Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc., the Factory Mutual Engineering Corporation, or another nationally recognized testing laboratory. Plastic containers (rather than metal) are recommended for use.

(2)  All equipment will be turned off during refueling.  Hot surfaces will be allowed to cool before refueling.  It is recommended that all tanks be filled prior to each operation to avoid the potential for explosion or fire during refueling.  Flames and/or smoking are not allowed during refueling.
 
(3)  Gasoline refueling will not take place on a plastic surface, e.g., a plastic lined pick-up truck bed.

(4)  Portable gas tanks will be placed on the ground for refueling.

K.  Equipment Inspection.  All external wiring, cables, and connectors will be visually inspected for physical damage or corrosion before each use.  Any equipment deficiency representing a potential safety hazard will be corrected before each field operation or during actual use when the damage occurs.

L.  Electrical specifications for Portable Electro Shockers (backpack, tow barge, shore-based, pre-positioned, etc.).

(1)  Electrode handles will be constructed of a nonconductive material and be long enough to avoid hand contact with the water.

(2)  The positive electrode (anode) used with portable electro shockers will be equipped with a manually-operated, normally open pressure switch that breaks the electric current upon release.  Do not bypass the manual switches with hold-down mechanisms such as tape.

M.  Backpack Electrofishing Units.

(1)  Batteries used as an electrical power source will be of the gel type that will not leak when tipped or overturned.

(2)  Backpacks will be equipped with a quick release belt (hip) and shoulder straps.

(3)  All equipment must be equipped with a tilt switch that opens the circuit in case the operator falls.  Switches that are manually reset are preferred over automatic resets.  New equipment requests should come with manually reset switches when available.

(4)  No netting will be used on the hand-held electrodes except when sampling for lamprey ammocoetes, or when the unit is equipped with an automatic shut-off switch that opens the circuit when an electrode is out of the water.

N.  Shore-based Electrofishing Units.

(1)  Each electrode operator must have an individual activation switch.

(2)  The generator must be manned to provide immediate shutdown in case of an emergency.

O.  Tow-Barge Electrofishing Units.

(1)  Each electrode operator must have an individual dead man switch.

(2)  The barge hull must be made of nonconductive material with the cathode attached to the hull bottom.

(3)  The generator must be manned to provide immediate shutdown in case of an emergency.

(4)  The tow barge operator must have a deadman switch that stops the electrical power in case the operator falls away from the barge.

P.  Electric Seine Electrofishing Units.

(1)  Each brail (seine pole) must have an individual activation switch wired in series to control the power applied to the electrodes.

(2)  The generator must be manned to provide immediate shutdown in case of an emergency.

Q.  Prepositioned Area Electrofishing Units The generator must be manned to provide immediate shutdown in case of an emergency.

R.  Color Coding/Labeling of Significant Hazards.  To ensure visibility, the color red will be used to identify fire extinguishers, safety cans, and stop buttons for electrical equipment.  The color fluorescent orange will be used to identify all other safety switches.

S.  Safe Work Practices.

(1)  All persons will wear U.S. Coast Guard approved personal flotation devices (Type III minimum) when working near, on, in, or over water, except in those cases where an approved site-specific job hazard analysis defines the conditions for an exemption (See USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 15, “Job Hazard Analyses.")

(2)  Leave the water immediately if waders or gloves develop leaks.

(3)  Avoid operating electrofishing equipment near people, pets, livestock, or wildlife that are in or near the water.

(4)  Cease operations in inclement weather (moderate to heavy rain, lightning, or thunderstorms).

(5)  Rest often to avoid fatigue, and drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration and heatstroke.

(6)  Do not wear conductive jewelry or clothing (such a watchbands, bracelets, rings, key chains, necklaces, metalized aprons, cloth with conductive thread, or metal headgear).

(7)  The anode should never touch the cathode or any other metal equipment.

(8)  The electrofishing operation must be shut down and repaired if anyone feels an electric shock, however minor.  An incident report will be provided to the Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator and the immediate supervisor.

T.  Automated External Defibrillators (AED).  It is highly recommended that every electrofishing boat be equipped with an AED.  If AEDs are provided, then a minimum of two crew members will be AED certified and a formal written program established at the local level, inclusive of medical director oversight.

U.  Immunization Program.  It is recommended that field personnel working on an electrofishing crew be offered a booster tetanus vaccination every 10 years.  Personnel should consult a physician to determine if hepatitis A and/or hepatitis B vaccinations are recommended based on their personal health and the areas where they are working.

V.  A formal bloodborne pathogens program, inclusive of offering employee immunizations, shall be established for those trained in First Aid/CPR-AED operations.  See USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, 445-2-H, Chapter 25, for bloodborne pathogen requirements.

 

8.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Assists Regional Safety Managers in identifying appropriate electrofishing safety training programs.

(2)  Conducts assessments of Bureau and regional science programs during formal reviews and inspections, when possible.

(3)  Provides Bureau oversight and direction for electrofishing activities.

B.  Regional Safety Manager.

(1)  Reviews and approves non-National Conservation Training Center electrofishing safety training programs upon request.

(2)  Conducts assessments of regional science programs during formal reviews and inspections.

(3)  Provides regional oversight and direction for the program.

C.  Regional Safety Officer.  Conducts assessments of field programs during formal reviews and inspections.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator.  Maintains current list of personnel possessing an electrofishing certificate of competency within their organizations, and provides the RSO or field managers with a copy of the list upon request.

E.  Managers/Supervisors.  Ensure that all persons serving as electrofishing Team Leaders have received the appropriate training and certification and forward documentation to the Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator. 

F.  Project Chiefs.  Ensure compliance with the provisions of this chapter and the following requirements:

(1)  Provide personnel assigned to work on an electrofishing crew with proper boots, gloves, and any other personal protective equipment required to ensure their safety while electrofishing.

(2)  Instruct other crew members on the safety procedures and potential hazards in electrofishing before the electrofishing field effort is undertaken.

(3)  Advise the project office of the location, start time, and end time of the scheduled electrofishing event.

(4)  Provide the personnel who are performing electrofishing operations with the required training and immunizations.

G.  Electrofishing Team Leaders.  Only individuals demonstrating knowledge of electrofishing techniques are eligible to serve as electrofishing Team Leaders.  Team Leaders will be considered knowledgeable of the principles and techniques of electrofishing upon satisfactory completion of an initial U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, e.g., National Conservation Training Center course, “Principles and Techniques of Electrofishing,” and, subsequently, a Regional Safety Manager-approved refresher course, as detailed in paragraph 6B of this chapter.  Team Leaders are responsible for the following:

(1)  Identifying hazardous conditions associated with proposed electrofishing operations, determining measures to protect electrofishing team members, and briefing team members appropriately.

(2)  Maintaining all electrofishing equipment in a safe condition.  Visually inspect all external wiring, cables, and connectors for physical damage before each use.  Any equipment deficiency that may present a safety hazard will be corrected before each field operation or when equipment damage occurs during actual use.

(3)  Verifying that personnel follow proper safety procedures and use the proper safety equipment.

(4)  Ensuring that adequate warning is provided to the public so that public exposure to the potential hazards of electrofishing operations is avoided.  Boats should be clearly marked with “Danger Electricity” signs.

(5)  Shutting down electrical power should the public approach closer than 100 feet to electrofishing operations.

(6)  Ensuring precautions are taken to avoid harm to domestic animals or wildlife.

(7)  Ceasing all electrofishing operations and relocating all crew members ashore during inclement weather.

(8)  Ensuring that only those persons necessary to conduct a safe and efficient operation engage in each electrofishing activity and verifying their training to ensure that electrofishing operations are conducted in a safe and efficient manner.

(9)  Ensuring that at least one other member of the team is certified in CPR and First Aid.

(10)  Making available a well-equipped, watertight First Aid kit.  Questions concerning the contents of the First Aid kit may be directed to the Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator, the Regional Safety Officer, or the Regional Safety Manager, as appropriate.

(11)  Reviewing the “USGS Electrofishing Considerations Checklist” found in Appendix 42-1, adding specialized items that pertain to each individual operation, as appropriate.

(12)  Ensure that the job hazard analysis for each site contains emergency instructions and documented routes to medical facilities and is made available to all team members.

H.  Personnel (Electrofishing Crew Members).

(1)  The Team Leader and at least one electrofishing crew member must complete training and maintain a current certification in First Aid and CPR.

(2)  If operating an electrofishing boat, complete the DOI Motorboat Operator Certification Course and maintain certification.

(3)  Wear appropriate protective equipment as required.

(4)  Report all potential work hazards, accidents, incidents, and job-related illnesses and injuries to their supervisors immediately.

Appendix 42-1: USGS Electrofishing Considerations Checklist

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                       10/8/09                  

_________________________________                              __________________
Karen D. Baker                                                                             Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services 
Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 43

Ergonomics

Date: 08/2002

 

43.1  Purpose and Scope.

A.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program (Program) requirements for Department of the Interior (Department or DOI) and U.S. Geological Survey (Bureau or USGS) ergonomics.

B.  This chapter applies to all USGS operations and activities.  Ergonomics is the study of work, which attempts to design the work environment to fit the employee’s physical capabilities and limitations.  The USGS is committed to preventing injuries associated with ergonomic hazards.  Through training, workplace evaluation, and redesign this Bureau hopes to greatly reduce the number and severity of musculoskeletal injuries experienced in the workplace.

 

43.2  Authorities/References.

A.  29 CFR 1910.900, Subpart W.

B.  Sections 4, 6, and 8, Occupational Safety and Health Act, 29 U.S.C. 653, 655, 657, Secretary of Labor's Order No. 3-2000 (65 FR 50017); and 29 CFR Part 1911.

 

43.3  Definitions.

A.  Ergonomics. The science that studies workers in their workplace and attempts through education, workplace design, job rotation, or use of specially designed tools and equipment to reduce the stress on the body.  The goal of an effective ergonomics program is to reduce the incidence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused by repetitive stress, awkward positioning, vibration, heavy lifting or bending, and reaching.  This policy is designed to reduce the number and severity of MSDs caused by exposure to risk factors found in the workplace.  This chapter establishes policy for implementing an effective ergonomics program that should virtually eliminate MSDs through personnel education, managerial support, and workplace evaluation and redesign.  This policy further encourages employee participation, as demonstrated by the early reporting of MSDs and active involvement by employees and their representatives in the implementation, evaluation, and continued development of the USGS program.  Finally this policy incorporates job hazard analysis (JHA) and control, as demonstrated by a process that identifies, analyzes, and uses feasible engineering, work practice, and administrative controls to control MSD hazards or reduce MSD hazards to acceptable levels or to the extent feasible and evaluates controls to assure that they are effective.

B.  Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs).  This includes a number of injuries to muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, bones, and supporting blood vessels in the upper or lower extremities or back.  Such injuries include back injuries, carpal tunnel syndrome, and Raynaud’s syndrome.  These conditions are caused by ergonomic hazards in the workplace such as awkward positioning, repetition, force, mechanical compression, vibration and duration of operation.  MSDs result from the cumulative effect of repeated trauma to a particular part of the body.  Cumulative trauma occurs when rest or overnight sleep fails to completely heal these small “microtraumas” that carry over and add to the total effect on the body.  Over time MSDs can result in permanent damage or disability.

 

43.4  Requirements.

A.  USGS personnel shall be informed about the ergonomic risks associated with the jobs that they are expected to perform when they are initially assigned to the job or when they are reassigned to another position.  Personnel will be educated about the most common MSDs, their signs and symptoms, and the importance of early reporting.  Early reporting is a key element since repeated trauma can eventually lead to permanent disability.  All work-related MSDs will be reported using the DOI Safety Management Information System (SMIS) (see Chapter 7, Incident/Accident Reporting/Serious Incident Reporting).

B.  Each organizational component will write and implement a plan for their individual location (a template is located in Appendix 43-1).  The plan will include a means for identifying ergonomic hazards in the workplace (JHA), means for reporting ergonomic hazards (employee reporting) and requesting work area evaluations, and training of staff at all levels.  Appropriate levels of training will be provided to organizational staff as discussed later in this chapter.

C.  Training will be provided to employees in jobs that have been identified as having ergonomic hazards during formal audits or during the supervisory job hazard analysis.  Supervisors and any other employees involved in setting up or managing the ergonomics program will also receive ergonomics training.

D.  At a minimum, all full time safety staff will be provided with an adequate amount of ergonomics training to be able to handle routine issues concerning ergonomics evaluations and work area design.  More complicated issues will be handled via the Public Health Service Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) or via contract with an Ergonomic Consultant.

E.  The identification of ergonomic hazards is a joint responsibility shared by management, supervisors, collateral duty safety officers, and employees.  The formal means for identifying hazards is through the use of a JHA or through the use of appropriate checklists, which will consider the risk of musculoskeletal injuries as a part of the evaluation.  JHA is a supervisory responsibility.  JHAs are discussed in Chapter 15 in this Handbook and a number of actual templates for JHAs are available on the USGS website.  Sample checklists for different types of jobs with ergonomic hazards are provided as appendixes to this chapter.  If hazards are discovered, control measures will be implemented to reduce the hazards.  Control measures can be as simple as an adjustment to a workstation or chair. Control measures can also mean job rotation or more complex solutions such an operation redesign.

F.  Personnel who report a recordable MSD incident will be provided with prompt access to a health care professional (HCP) for evaluation and follow-up subsequent to their injury or illness.  The HCP will determine if any modification of the regular duties are necessary.  Upon reporting, supervisors will investigate and the employees, along with management, will be involved in the process of suggesting solutions that are reasonable in terms of completing the job efficientlyand safely.

 

43.5  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager and Bureau Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Provide guidance and assistance to the regional offices in setting up their regional programs.

(2)  Provide checklists to assist the field component in evaluating work areas with identified ergonomic risk factors/hazards.

(3)  Assist regions with designing and arranging for appropriate training in ergonomics for staff at all levels (this may include web-based training, training-the-trainer training via PHS contract or a professional ergonomics trainer).

(4)  Provide materials and educational articles via the quarterly newsletter, for example.

B.  Regional Directors/Executives.  Provide sufficient resources and delegate appropriate authority and responsibility to the Regional Ergonomics Program Managers (Regional Safety Managers or designee) and supervisory staff to develop and implement a viable ergonomics program to include training staff on ergonomics and to make work area modifications when work-related musculoskeletal injuries have occurred.

C.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide regional compliance oversight and assistance to Regional Safety Officers and field staff to implement the Bureau Ergonomics Program.  This policy will include:

(a)  How training will be accomplished for supervisors, collateral duty safety officers, and all employees working in jobs with ergonomic risks.

(b)  Procedures for requesting an ergonomic evaluation and how the ergonomic evaluations will be accomplished.

(2)  Provide training to regional staff and act as the regional consultant on ergonomic issues.

(3)  Develop an Action Plan and implement an across the board training plan for Supervisors, Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs), and employees working in areas with ergonomic hazards.

(4)  Assist CDSPCs via providing consultation on unique ergonomic issues and engineering or design requests.

D.  Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Participate in appropriate training to be able to provide guidance to supervisors and CDSPCs on ergonomic issues.

(2)  Coordinate with the PHS for advice and consultation for unique or complex ergonomic hazards that require the expertise of a professional ergonomist or human factors engineer.

(3)  Assist the Regional Safety Manager with coordinating training for personnel throughout the region.

E.  Supervisors.

(1)  Conduct JHAs to determine which jobs contain ergonomic hazards or risk factors.

(2)  Ensure that personnel participate in training on ergonomics and can identify the signs and symptoms of MSDs.

(3)  Ensure that sound ergonomic principles are integrated into all aspects of the work being performed.

(4)  Encourage early reporting of work related MSDs, since early intervention is critical to minimize the damage which can be caused by repeated exposure to ergonomic risk factors.

(5)  Ensure that personnel are referred for medical evaluation, if they sustain a work-related musculoskeletal injury.

(6)  Ensure that recommendations from ergonomics surveys, which may include purchase of new furniture or equipment, work rotation, or adjustment of existing furniture or equipment, are implemented.

F.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(1)  Participate in initial training on ergonomics to be able to conduct basic ergonomics evaluations through the use of a checklist.

(2)  Perform workplace assessments upon request for work areas where ergonomic hazards have been identified during a JHA or for which complaints have been received. Examples of workplace assessment checklists have been provided in Appendixes 43-1 through 43-6.

(3)  Provide copies of the evaluations to the Regional Safety Managers.

43.6  Additional Resources.

Appendix 43-1: Sample Local Ergonomics Standard Operating Procedure

Appendix 43-2: Computer Workstation Checklist.

Appendix 43-3: General Workstation Checklist

Appendix 43-4: Task Analysis Checklist

 

Appendix 43-5: Hand Tools Analysis Checklist

Appendix 43-6: Materials Handling Checklist

 

 

CHAPTER 44

Fall Protection Program

Instruction: This chapter is being revised to include appendices and additional definitions.

 

1.  Purpose. To specify the minimum requirements to reduce fall hazard risks for USGS employees. 

 

2.  References.

A.  29 CFR 1910 Subpart D (1910.21 through 1910.30), Walking-Working Surfaces.

B.  29 CFR 1926 Subpart M (1926.500 through 1926.503), Fall Protection.

C.  OSHA Instruction STD 1-1.10 June 30, 1981, Height of Guardrails in General Industry Applications.

D.  USGS Occupational Safety and Health Program Requirements Handbook, Chapter 41, Cableway Safety.

 

3.  Scope.

A.  The Fall Protection Program applies to USGS employees and others for whom the Government assumes workers’ compensation liability and whose duties may expose them to falls of 4 feet or more to a surface below or to dangerous machinery from any height.  This includes volunteers covered by a properly executed USGS Form 9-2080, Individual Volunteer Services Agreement, and students acquired by purchase orders citing Public Law 106-113 as the authority for the award.  Note:  Supervisors are to keep visitors (or volunteers not covered by a Form 9-2080) away from such circumstances, as is customary at construction or other hazardous sites where notices are posted and visitors are not allowed to proceed at all or without proper protection.  In order to simplify the requirements, the program is more protective in some areas than is required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

B.  Examples of USGS fall hazards include, but are not limited to, the following: stairs; ladders; floor and wall openings; roofs; balconies; ramps and walkways; telecommunication towers; drilling rigs; trees; bridges; dams; cliffs; excavations; roof skylights; overhead work areas; powered platforms; man lifts; vehicle-mounted work platforms; mobile ladder stands; scaffolds; pits and trapdoor floor openings; stilling wells; manholes; pools; and boats.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  In general, authorized employees who are within 8 feet from being exposed to a fall hazard of 4 feet or more to a surface below or to dangerous machinery from any height will be provided with fall protection.  The preferred fall protection method is an engineering control such as standard railings or elimination of the fall hazard from the workplace.

(1)  Standard Railing.  The first choice for fall protection is a standard railing.  A standard railing consists of a top rail, intermediate rail, and posts.  The height of the railing should be between 36 inches to 44 inches, 42 inches being preferred.  The top rail should be smooth surfaced.  The ends of the rails should not overhang the terminal posts except where the overhang does not make a projection hazard.  The railing should be capable of withstanding a force of at least 200 pounds applied within 2 inches of the top edge, in any outward or downward direction, at any point along the top edge.  A cover or barricade may be used in place of a standard railing.

(2)  Stair Railings and Handrails.  Flights of stairs with four or more risers will have standard stair railings or standard handrails.  Stair railings should be from 30 to 34 inches high from the upper surface of the top rail to the surface of tread in line with face of riser at forward edge of tread.

(3)  Safety Nets.  In general, safety nets will not be used.

(4)  Personal Fall Arrest Systems.  The second choice for fall protection is a personal fall arrest system.  This consists of a full body harness, connectors, and an anchorage capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds.  Alternatively, it must be designed and installed as part of a complete personal fall arrest system, which maintains a safety factor of at least two (e.g., will support at least twice the maximum force in a fall), and under the supervision of a qualified person.  All free falls must be limited to no more than 6 feet. USGS employees are prohibited from using body belts for fall arrest.

The kind of personal fall arrest system selected should match the particular work situation, and any possible free-fall distance should be kept to a minimum, not to exceed 6 feet.  The presence of acids, dirt, moisture, oil, grease, etc., and their effect on the system should be evaluated.  Hot or cold environments may also have an adverse effect on the system.  Wire rope should not be used where an electrical hazard is anticipated.

(a)  Anchor Point.  One of the most important aspects of personal fall protection systems is fully planning the system before it is put to use.  Probably the most overlooked component is planning for suitable anchor points.  Ideally, planning should be done before the structure or building is constructed so that anchor points can be incorporated during construction for use later for window cleaning or other building maintenance.  If properly planned, these anchor points may be used during and after construction.

Properly planned anchor points should be used if they are available.  In some cases, anchorages must be installed immediately prior to use.  In such cases, a registered professional engineer with experience in designing fall protection systems, or another qualified person with appropriate education and experience, should design an anchor point to be installed.

In other cases, there will be a need to devise an anchor point from existing structures.  Examples of what might be appropriate anchor points are steel members or I-beams if an acceptable strap is available for the connection (do not use a lanyard with a snap hook clipped onto itself); large eyebolts made of an appropriate grade steel; guardrails or railings if they have been designed for use as an anchor point; or masonry or wood members only if the attachment point is substantial and precautions have been taken to assure that bolts or other connectors will not pull through.  A qualified person should evaluate the suitability of these "makeshift" anchor points with a focus on proper strength.

(b)  Tie-Offs.  When a tie-off is made using a knot in a rope lanyard or lifeline (at any location), it can reduce the lifeline or lanyard strength by 50 percent or more.  If a knot must be used, a stronger lanyard or lifeline should be used to compensate for the weakening effect of the knot.  Alternatively, the lanyard length should be reduced or the tie-off location should be raised to minimize free-fall distance.  When possible, the lanyard or lifeline should be replaced by one with a connector that eliminates the need for a knot.

Tie-off of a rope lanyard or lifeline around an "H" or "I" beam or similar support can reduce its strength as much as 70 percent due to the cutting action of the beam edges.  Therefore, use a webbing lanyard or wire core lifeline around the beam; or protect the lanyard or lifeline from the edge; or minimize the free-fall distance.

Tie-off where the line passes over or around rough or sharp surfaces reduces strength drastically. Such a tie-off should be avoided or an alternative tie-off rigging should be used.  Such alternatives may include use of a snap hook/d-ring connection, wire rope tie-off, an effective padding of the surfaces, or an abrasion-resistance strap around or over the problem surface.

(c)  Horizontal Lifelines.  Horizontal lifelines may, depending on their geometry and angle of sag, be subjected to greater loads than the impact load imposed by an attached component.  When the angle of a horizontal lifeline sag is less than 30 degrees, the impact force imparted to the lifeline by an attached lanyard is greatly amplified.  For example, with a sag angle of 15 degrees, the force amplification is about 2:1; with a sag angle of 5 degrees, it is about 6:1.  Depending on the angle of sag and the line's elasticity, the strength of the horizontal lifeline and the anchor points to which it is attached should be increased a number of times over that of the lanyard. Extreme care should be taken in considering a horizontal lifeline for multiple tie-offs.  In the case of multiple tie-offs to a horizontal lifeline, if one person falls, the movement of the falling person and the horizontal lifeline during arrest of the fall may also cause others to fall.  Horizontal lifeline and anchor point strength should be increased for each additional person to be tied off.  For these and other reasons, the design of systems using horizontal lifelines must only be done by qualified persons. Testing of installed lifelines and anchors prior to use is recommended.

(d)  Eyebolts.  The strength of an eyebolt is rated along the axis of the bolt, and its strength is greatly reduced if the force is applied at an angle to this axis (in the direction of shear).  Care should be exercised in selecting the proper diameter of the eyebolt to avoid accidental disengagement of snap hooks not designed to be compatible for the connection.  Vendors can provide expert advice in selecting equipment.

(e)  Sliding Hitch Knot.  Due to the significant reduction in the strength of the lifeline/lanyard (in some cases, as much as a 70 percent reduction), the sliding hitch knot (prusik) should not be used for lifeline/lanyard connections except in emergency situations where no other available system is practical.  The "one-and-one" sliding hitch knot should never be used because it is unreliable in stopping a fall.  The "two-and-two”, or the preferred "three-and-three," knot may be used in emergency situations; however, care should be taken to limit free-fall distance to a minimum, not to exceed 6 feet, because of reduced lifeline/lanyard strength.

(f)  Vertical Lifelines.  Each person should have a separate lifeline when the lifeline is vertical.

(g)  Snap Hooks.  Locking snap hooks designed for connection to suitable objects are required.  Locking snap hooks incorporate a positive locking mechanism in addition to the spring loaded keeper, which will not allow the keeper to open under moderate pressure without someone first releasing the mechanism.  Such a feature, properly designed, effectively prevents rollout from occurring.

B.  Protection from Falling Objects.  Where persons work under or pass under a work area, a method to prevent tools and materials from falling on these persons must be provided.  This protection can be a solid canopy, a barricade for the area, or it can be toe boards, screens, or mesh from the top rail to the walking/working level and along the entire opening between top rail supports.  Personnel who work under or pass under a work area that may have falling objects must wear hard hats.

C.  Exceptions.

(1)  Ladders.  Additional fall protection is not required for fixed ladders that are 20 feet long or less.  Fixed ladders that are more than 20 feet long may have landing platforms, ladder safety devices, or cages.  Portable ladders that are more than 20 feet long should be used with caution and always used with another person present to assist.

(2)  Restraints.  Whenever possible, personal fall protection systems should be designed to prevent a worker from reaching the fall hazard (e.g., edge of the roof).  When the worker is restrained and cannot reach the fall hazard, the anchor point may be less than 5,000 pounds, but at least 200 pounds such as a standard railing.

(3)  Working over Water.  When working over water on bridges, dams, pools, and boats, the preferred fall protection is a standard railing.  When a standard railing is not available, the second choice is a personal fall arrest system, followed by a personal flotation device (PFD).  In some cases, a PFD is required. However, methods to prevent the fall should be implemented whenever possible.

(4)  Fall Protection Plans.  When standard railings and personal fall arrest systems are infeasible or create a greater hazard, a written fall protection plan must be prepared showing the method used to provide equivalent protection from falls.  The fall protection plan should include the following:

(a)  The reason why the use of a guardrail system or personal fall arrest system is infeasible, or why its use would create a greater hazard.

(b)  Measures that will be taken to reduce or eliminate the fall hazard for workers who cannot be provided with protection from a guardrail system or personal fall arrest system.  For example, explain how scaffolds, ladders, or vehicle-mounted work platforms can be used to provide a safer working surface and, thereby, reduce the hazard of falling.

(c)  Identify the locations where guardrail systems or personal fall arrest systems cannot be used.

(d)  Include a statement which provides the name or other method of identification of each employee who is designated to work in controlled access zones.  No other employees may enter controlled access zones.

(e)  In the event that a worker falls, or some other related, serious incident occurs (e.g., a near miss), the circumstances of the fall or other incident will be investigated to determine if the fall protection plan needs to be changed (e.g., new practices, procedures, or training).  If necessary, changes will be made to the fall protection plan to prevent similar types of falls or incidents.

(f)  Name, date, and signature of the qualified person who prepared the fall protection plan.

D.  Training.

(1)  Railings, Stairs, and Ladders.  All personnel should be trained in the nature of fall hazards in the work area; the proper construction, use, placement, and care in handling of all stairways and ladders; the maximum intended load-carrying capacities of ladders; how to report fall hazards; and other pertinent requirements of the OSHA standards.

(2)  Scaffolds.  Workers who assemble or use scaffolds must have additional training by a competent person on the type of scaffolding used.  They should also be trained in the nature of electrical hazards and the correct procedures for dealing with those hazards; fall hazards and falling object hazards in the work area; erecting, maintaining, and disassembling the fall protection systems; the falling object protection systems being used; the proper use of the scaffold; the proper handling of materials on the scaffold; design criteria; the maximum intended load and the load-carrying capacities of the scaffolds used; correct procedures for erecting, disassembling, moving, operating, repairing, inspecting, and maintaining the type of scaffold in question; and other pertinent requirements of the OSHA standards.

(3)  Personal Fall Arrest Systems.  Personnel who use personal fall arrest systems must have additional training by a competent person in the selection and use of the personal fall arrest systems being used.  This training should include the following: application limits; proper anchoring and tie-off techniques; estimation of free-fall distance, including determination of deceleration distance, and total fall distance to prevent striking a lower level; methods of use; and inspection and storage of the system.  Careless or improper use of the equipment can result in serious injury or death. Personnel should become familiar with the manufacturer's recommendations before a system is used.  Particular attention should be paid to the reduction in strength caused by certain tie-offs (e.g., using knots, tying around sharp edges, etc.) and the maximum permitted free-fall distance of 6 feet.  Inspections prior to use are critically important as well as limitations of the equipment and unique conditions at the worksite.  All three of these factors may be important in determining the type of system to be used.

(4)  Certified Written Record.  A certified written record will be made of the training to include the name of the employee trained, the date of the training, and either the signature of the person conducting the training or the supervisor.

E.  Rescue.  When personal fall-arrest systems are used, there must be a plan to assure that anyone who falls can be promptly rescued or can rescue one’s self.  The availability of rescue personnel, ladders, devices which have descent capability, or other rescue equipment should be evaluated.  In some situations, equipment which allows someone to rescue one’s self after the fall has been arrested may be desirable.

F.  Inspections.  All fall protection equipment requires routine inspection.  The frequency of inspections will depend on the use and the risk.  Inspections once or twice a year may be appropriate for permanent railing while personal fall arrest systems should be inspected before each shift.

(1)  Ladders.  Ladders are to be inspected by a competent person for visible defects on a periodic basis and after any occurrence that could affect their safe use.  Ladders with structural defects, such as broken or missing rungs, cleats, or steps; broken or split rails; corroded components; or other faulty or defective components, shall either be immediately marked in a manner that readily identifies them as defective, or be tagged with "Do Not Use" or similar language and withdrawn from service until repaired.

(2)  Stairs.  Stairs are to be inspected by a competent person for visible defects such as variations in riser height or tread depth; metal pan landings and metal pan treads not secured; hazardous projections; slippery conditions; and missing or damaged handrails.

(3)  Personal Fall Arrest Systems.  Components of personal fall arrest systems are to be inspected for visible defects such as cuts, tears, and abrasions; mold; undue stretching; alterations or additions which might affect its efficiency; damage due to deterioration; contact with fire, acids, or other corrosives; distorted hooks or faulty hook springs; tongues unfitted to the shoulder of buckles; loose or damaged mountings; or non-functioning parts.  Worn or deteriorating ropes must be withdrawn from service immediately and either marked as unusable or destroyed.

(4)  Scaffolds.  Scaffolds and scaffold components are to be inspected by a competent person for visible defects before each work shift and after any incident that could affect the scaffold's structural integrity.

(5)  Aerial Lifts.  Aerial lift controls are to be tested daily before use.  Prior to moving an aerial lift for travel, the boom is to be inspected to see that it is properly cradled and outriggers are in stowed position.

G.  Reducing Risk.  All risk cannot be eliminated from a job, but substitutions can be made to reduce the risk.  Whenever it is reasonable, fall-hazard risks should be reduced.  In general,

(1)  Standard railings are better than personal fall arrest systems.

(2)  Stairs are better than ladders.

(3)   Fixed ladders are better than portable ladders.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Provides Bureau-wide oversight and direction for the Fall Protection Program.

(2)  Conducts reviews and evaluates the effectiveness of headquarters and regional Fall Protection Programs and modifies policy and procedures as applicable.

(3)  Provides assistance, including training, to Regional Safety Managers in the development of Fall Protection Programs.

B.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide region-wide direction and oversight for the administration of an appropriate Fall Protection Program, serving as the focal point for program development and implementation in the regions; provide technical advice to Regional Safety Officers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators (CDSPCs).

(2)  Evaluate effectiveness of regional Fall Protection Programs and make recommendations for improvement.

C.  Regional Safety Officers.

(1)  Oversee the administration of Fall Protection Programs for regional science program field locations.

(2)  Serve as the focal point for the implementation of the regional science Fall Protection Programs and provide technical advice to field level CDSPCs and regional management.

(3)  Provide assistance to managers and CDSPCs in regional science program field locations in developing Fall Protection Programs.

(4)  Evaluate effectiveness of regional science program field-level Fall Protection Programs and make recommendations for improvement.

D.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist management and supervisors in the implementation of the Fall Protection Program, including training and education.

(2)  Assist supervisors in identifying personnel with potential for occupational exposure to falls and help conduct or coordinate appropriate training programs.

(3)  Assist in the development of a fall protection plan when standard railings and personal fall arrest systems are not feasible.

(4)  Assist supervisors in reviewing and updating the program as needed.

E.  Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Coordinate personnel training and education by qualified instructors on the Fall Protection Program.

(2)  Determine the personnel who have possible occupational exposure to falls.  Ensure that they receive required training and that training is properly documented.

(3)  Establish and maintain an effective Fall Protection Program.

(4)  Review and update the Fall Protection Program if someone falls; if some other related, serious incident occurs (e.g., a near miss); or if there are new or revised jobs with fall exposures.

F.  Employees.

(1)  Participate in required training programs.

(2)  Be familiar with the facility’s Fall Protection Program.

(3)  Wear appropriate personal protective equipment and observe appropriate work practice controls.

(4)  Report fall hazards (e.g., damaged or missing railings and holes in floors or walls) to the Supervisor or Manager.

 

6.  Additional Resources.

A.  OSHA Publication 3146, Fall Protection in Construction.

http://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3146.pdf

B.  OSHA Safety and Health Topics, Fall Protection.

http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/fallprotection/index.html

C.  Appendix 44-1, Sample Fall Protection Program.

D.  Appendix 44-2, Job Hazard Analysis.

E.  Appendix 44-3, Hazard Control Options.

F.  Appendix 44-4, Sample Fall Protection Plan.

 

7.  Definitions.

A.  Anchor Point.  A secure point of attachment for lifelines, lanyards or deceleration devices.  An anchor point must be capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds (3,600 pounds if engineered/ certified by a qualified person) per person and must be independent of any anchorage being used to support or suspend platforms.

B.  Authorized Person.  A person approved or assigned by the USGS to perform a specific type of duty or duties or to be at a specific location or job site (e.g., building maintenance, roof repair, etc.).

C.  Body Belt (safety belt).  A strap that can be secured about the waist or attached to a lanyard, lifeline, or deceleration device. USGS employees are prohibited from using body belts for fall arrest.

D.  Body Harness.  Straps which may be secured about the employee in a manner that will distribute the fall arrest forces over at least the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest, and shoulders with means for attaching it to other components of a personal fall arrest system.

E.  Buckle.  Any device for holding the body belt or body harness closed around the employee's body.

F.  Carabiner.  A metal loop with a sprung or screwed gate.  It can quickly and reversibly connect components in safety-critical systems.

G.  Clearance.  The distance required to prevent the worker from striking the next level or any other obstruction below.

H.  Competent Person.  One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate those conditions.  The employer (manager) should decide if an employee has the knowledge, training, and authority to be a "competent person."

I.  Connector.  A device which is used to couple (connect) parts of the personal fall arrest system and positioning device systems together.  It may be an independent component of the system, such as a carabiner, or it may be an integral component of part of the system (e.g., a buckle or D-ring sewn into a body harness, or a snap hook spliced or sewn to a lanyard or self-retracting lanyard).

J.  Controlled Access Zone.  An area in which certain work (e.g., overhand bricklaying) may take place without the use of guardrail systems, personal fall arrest systems, or safety net systems and access to the zone is controlled.

K.  Dangerous Equipment.  Equipment (e.g., pickling or galvanizing tanks, degreasing units, machinery, electrical equipment, and other units) which, as a result of form or function, may be hazardous to employees who fall onto or into such equipment.

L.  Deceleration Device.  Any mechanism (e.g., a rope grab, rip-stitch lanyard, specially woven lanyard, tearing or deforming lanyards, automatic self-retracting lifelines/lanyards, etc.) which serves to dissipate a substantial amount of energy during a fall arrest or, otherwise, limits the energy imposed on an employee during fall arrest.

M.  Decelcration Distance.  The additional vertical distance a falling employee travels, excluding lifeline elongation and free-fall distance, before stopping, from the point at which the deceleration device begins to operate.  It is measured as the distance between the location of an employee's body belt or body harness attachment point at the moment of activation (at the onset of fall arrest forces) of the deceleration device during a fall and the location of that attachment point after the employee comes to a full stop.

N.  Equivalent.  Alternative designs, materials, or methods to protect against a hazard which the employer can demonstrate will provide an equal or greater degree of safety for employees than the methods, materials, or designs specified in the standard.

O.  Failure.  Load refusal, breakage, or separation of component parts. Load refusal is the point where the ultimate strength is exceeded.

P.  Free Fall.  The act of falling before a personal fall arrest system begins to apply force to arrest the fall.

Q.  Free-Fall Distance.  The vertical displacement of the fall arrest attachment point on the employee's body belt or body harness between onset of the fall and just before the system begins to apply force to arrest the fall.  This distance excludes deceleration distance and lifeline/lanyard elongation, but includes any deceleration device slide distance or self-retracting lifeline/lanyard extension before they operate and fall arrest forces occur.  Free-fall distance must not exceed 6 feet.

R.  Full Body Harness:  Webbing/straps which are secured about an employee's body in a manner that will distribute the fall arrest forces over the thighs, pelvis, waist, chest, and shoulders.  Having means for attaching it to other components of a personal fall arrest system, preferably at the shoulders and/or middle of the back.

S.  Guardrail System.  A barrier erected to prevent employees from falling to lower levels. This system includes a toe board, midrail and toprail able to withstand 200 pounds of force applied in any direction.

T.  Hole.  A gap or void, 2 inches or more in its least dimension, in a floor, roof, or other walking/working surface.

U.  Infeasible.  It is impossible to perform the construction work using a conventional fall protection system (e.g., guardrail system, safety-net system, or personal fall arrest system) or that it is technologically impossible to use any one of these systems to provide fall protection.

V.  Lanyard.  A flexible line of rope, wire rope, or strap which generally has a connector at each end for connecting the body belt or body harness to a deceleration device, lifeline, or anchor point.

W.  Leading Edge.  The edge of a floor, roof, or formwork for a floor or other walking/working surface (e.g., deck) which changes location as additional floor, roof, decking, or formwork sections are placed, formed, or constructed.  A leading edge is considered to be an "unprotected side and edge" during periods when it is not actively and continuously under construction.

X.  Lifeline.  A component consisting of a flexible line for connection to an anchor point at one end to hang vertically (vertical lifeline), or for connection to anchor points at both ends to stretch horizontally (horizontal lifeline), and which serves as a means for connecting other components of a personal fall arrest system to the anchor point.

Y.  Lower Levels.  Areas or surfaces to which an employee can fall. Such areas or surfaces include, but are not limited to, ground levels, floors, platforms, ramps, runways, excavations, pits, tanks, material, water, equipment, structures, or portions thereof.

Z.  Low Slope Roof.  A roof having a slope of less than or equal to 4 in 12 (vertical to horizontal).  A roof with approximately a 19.5 degree slope or less.

AA.  Mechanical Equipment.  All motor- or human-propelled wheeled equipment used for roofing work, except wheelbarrows and mop carts.

BB.  Opening.  A gap or void, 30 inches or more high and 18 inches or more wide, in a wall or partition through which employees can fall to a lower level.

CC.  OSHA.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

DD.  Personal Fall Arrest System.  A system used to arrest an employee in a fall from a working level.  It consists of an anchor point, connectors, a body belt, or body harness and may include a lanyard, deceleration device, lifeline, or suitable combinations of these.  USGS employees are prohibited from using body belts for fall arrest.

EE.  Qualified Person.  An individual, who by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated his or her ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, work, or project.

FF.  Roof.  The exterior surface on top of a building.  This does not include floors or formwork which, because a building has not been completed, temporarily become the top surface of a building.

GG.  Roofing Work.  The hoisting, storage, application, and removal of roofing materials and equipment, including related insulation, sheet metal, and vapor barrier work, but does not include the construction of the roof deck.

HH.  Rope Grab.  A deceleration device which travels on a lifeline and automatically, by friction, engages the lifeline and locks so as to arrest the fall of an employee.  A rope grab usually employs the principle of inertial locking, cam/level locking, or both.

II.  Safety-Monitoring System.  A safety system in which a competent person is responsible for recognizing and warning employees of fall hazards.

JJ.  Self-Retracting Lifeline/Lanyard.  A deceleration device containing a drum-wound line which can be slowly extracted from or retracted onto the drum under slight tension during normal employee movement and which, after onset of a fall, automatically locks the drum and arrests the fall.

KK.  Snap Hook.  A connector comprised of a hook-shaped member with a normally closed keeper, or similar arrangement, which may be opened to permit the hook to receive an object and, when released, automatically closes to retain the object.  The locking type has a self-closing, self-locking keeper which remains closed and locked until unlocked and pressed open for connection or disconnection.

LL.  Steep Slope Roof.  A roof having a slope greater than 4 in 12 (vertical to horizontal).  A roof with a slope greater than 19.5 degrees.

MM.  Toe Board.  A low, protective barrier that will prevent the fall of materials and equipment to lower levels and provide protection from falls for personnel.

NN.  Total Fall Distance.  The maximum vertical change in distance from the bottom of an individual's feet at the onset of a fall, to the position of the feet after the fall is arrested.  This includes the free-fall distance and the deceleration distance.

OO.  Unprotected Sides and Edges.  Any side or edge (except at entrances to points of access) of a walking/working surface (e.g., floor, roof, ramp, or runway) where there is no wall or guardrail system at least 39 inches high.

PP.  Walking/Working Surface.  Any surface, whether horizontal or vertical, on which an employee walks or works including, but not limited to, floors, roofs, ramps, bridges, runways, formwork, and concrete reinforcing steel but not including ladders, vehicles, or trailers, on which employees must be located in order to perform their job duties.

QQ.  Warning Line System.  A barrier erected on a roof to warn employees that they are approaching an unprotected roof side or edge, and which designates an area in which roofing work may take place without the use of guardrail, body belt, or safety net systems to protect employees in the area.

RR.  Work Area.  That portion of a walk/work surface where job duties are being performed.

Appendix 44-2: Job Hazard Analysis

Appendix 44-3: Hazard Control Options

 

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker

____________________________________________                    __1/7/09______________

Karen D. Baker                                                                                               Date

Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

Designated Agency Safety and Health Official

 

 

CHAPTER 45

The Management of Occupational Heat Stress

Instruction:  Changes to this chapter were made to reflect Bureau organization changes.

 

1.  Purpose.  To establish policy and procedures for employees working in hot environments in order to prevent heat-related illnesses. This policy applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and those who work under USGS funding or direction.

2.  References.

A.  Occupational Exposure to Hot Environments, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Revised Criteria 1986

B. Threshold Limit Values (TLVs ®) and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs ®) Based on the Documentation of the Threshold Limit Values for Chemicals Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, current edition.

 

3.  Requirements

A.  Evaluate the work environment for heat stress conditions by measuring the wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index using a WBGT meter. (Refer to Appendix A, Table 1: WBGT Index and Work-Rest/Water Intake Schedule.) Where a WBGT meter is not available, use the Heat Index chart in Appendix B until a further evaluation can be conducted. Reevaluate the work environment when there is a potential for changes in heat stress conditions.

B.  Develop a site-specific Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) to mitigate the risk to heat stress illness based on a worksite evaluation of heat stress conditions.  Update the JHA when followup evaluations determine a change in heat stress conditions.

C.  Implement a work-rest and fluid intake schedule when heat stress conditions have been identified. (Refer to Appendix A, WBGT Index and Work-Rest/Water Intake Schedule.)

D.  Acclimatize employees and monitor all employees for heat-related illnesses, while working in environments where heat stress conditions have been identified.

E.  Provide training to all employees working in heat stress conditions.  Training should be provided annually or when assigned work in hot environments.  Training shall include at a minimum:

(1)  The types of heat–related illnesses and how to recognize their signs and symptoms. (See Appendix C, List of Heat Related Illnesses.)

(2)  Recognition and evaluation of heat stress conditions.

(3)  Procedures and practices established to prevent heat–related illnesses including work-rest schedules and limiting or postponing certain activities until cooler periods.

(4)  Importance of drinking small quantities of water with electrolytes, often; restraining from the use of alcohol; and eating smaller meals.

(5)  Procedures for acclimatizing worker.

(6)  Procedures for responding to possible heat-related illness, including providing first aid and contacting emergency medical services.

(7)  Importance of immediately reporting signs or symptoms of heat-related illness to the supervisor.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Heat Stress Program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official, who, for the Bureau, is the Associate Director for Administration

B. Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO). Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish and maintain a bureauwide heat stress management program.

C.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to local sites to implement and comply with the Bureau’s heat stress management program.

(2)  Ensure that managers and supervisors are aware of their responsibility to comply with the Bureau’s heat stress management program requirements.

(3)  Ensure that regional, national capabilities, facility, and local program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services

(1)  Assigns Heat Stress Program responsibilities to the Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for Bureau program management and administration.

(2)  Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities implementation of heat stress program requirements.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides policy development and program oversight of the Bureau’s heat stress management program.

(2)  Provide direction oversight, serving as the focal point for compliance with the Bureau’s heat stress management requirements for national capability organizations and facilities and provide technical assistance, as requested, to Regional Safety Managers.

(3)  Conduct national capabilities and regional program evaluations, in accordance with SM 445-2-H.5 Program Evaluations, to assess the effectiveness and implementation of the Bureau’s heat stress management program.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide regionwide direction and oversight for the administration of the Bureau’s heat stress management program, serving as the focal point for regional compliance and provide technical assistance to collateral duty safety program coordinators.

(2)  Assist collateral duty safety program coordinators as required in establishing JHAs for specific jobsites that address heat stress management and coordinating employee training.

(3)  Evaluate effectiveness of field-level heat stress management during inspections, making recommendations for improvement and/or implementation, as appropriate.

G.  Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Ensure that adequate resources are available to fully address heat stress management within the centers and jobsites.

(2)  Evaluate the hot work environments for heat stress conditions and identify all work activities and locations where employees could be susceptible to heat-related illnesses.

(3)  Ensure that all employees assigned to perform strenuous work in hot environments are physically capable of safely carrying out their duties.  New employees or employees assigned to new positions where they are exposed to heat stress conditions may need to be medically cleared prior to assignment in these types of jobs.  Refer to SM 445-2-H.23 Occupational Medicine – Medical Surveillance Program and the Department of the Interior (DOI) Occupational Medicine Handbook for guidance on pre-employment/pre-placement exams.

(4)  Provide cool water to replace fluids.  If employees will be out in the heat for extended periods of time, sports drinks are recommended to replace electrolytes lost due to sweating.

(5)  Provide cool areas for rest and recovery.

(6)  Arrange work schedules so that the most strenuous work is conducted during the coolest part of the day.

(7)  Monitor all employees working in hot environments to ensure that they are drinking adequate quantities of fluids and to ensure that employees are not suffering from heat-related illnesses.

(8)  Be familiar with the signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses and take appropriate action when someone exhibits these signs or symptoms. (See Appendix C for a list of heat-related illnesses and recommended first aid.)

(9)  Ensure that all employees assigned to perform work in hot conditions are properly trained on the different types of heat–related illnesses and can perform first aid should they occur,

(10)  Report any heat-related incidents in the Safety Management Information System.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers and supervisors with complying with the Bureau’s heat stress management policy, including assisting in evaluating the work environment for heat-stress conditions.

(2)  Provide input to managers and supervisors on the effectiveness of site specific JHAs addressing heat stress management.

I.  Employees.

(1)  Follow the locally established heat stress management practices, as addressed in the site-specific JHAs.

(2)  Participate in heat stress training and be familiar with the hazards associated with working in hot environments and the signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses.  Information about heat-related illnesses, initial first aid, and when to seek professional medical help is provided in Appendix C.

(3)  Keep track of the local heat index or WBGT (Wet Bulb Globe Temperature) and moderate work, rest, and hydration based on Appendix A.  Contact the collateral duty safety program coordinator, as needed.

(4)  Report any heat-related illnesses to the manager or supervisor.

Appendix 45-A: Work Rest Times and Fluid Replacement Volumes

 

Appendix 45-B: Heat Index Chart

Appendix 45-C: Heat-Related Illnesses

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                                          April 24, 2014
_________________________________________________                      _________________
Karen D. Baker                                                                                                           Date
Acting Associate Director for Administration and Human Capital  

 

 

CHAPTER 46

Bear Spray Safety Program

Instruction:  This is a new chapter to address the use of bear spray for defense against wild animal attacks.

 

1.  Purpose.  To establish the minimum Occupational Safety and Health Program requirements for the Bear Spray Safety Program at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

 

2.  Scope.

A.  The requirements covered in this chapter apply to USGS employees, volunteers covered by a properly executed USGS Form 9-2080, Individual Volunteer Services Agreement, and students acquired by purchase orders citing Public Law 106-113 as the authority for the award, that use bear spray for protection against wild animal attacks in the performance of their official duties.  In addition to applying child labor laws and volunteer requirements in the utilization of minors, the USGS prohibits assigning those under the age of 18 hazardous duties involving the use of firearms, explosives, bear spray, or incendiaries.

B.  The USGS does not train for nor sanction the use of bear spray for defense against humans.  The USGS only sanctions use of bear spray that is specifically designed for defense against wild animal attacks. 

C.  Safety training requirements for bear spray devices can be found under section 6 in this chapter.

 

3.  Authorities.

A.  29 CFR 1910.1200.

B.  29 CFR Parts 570 to 580.

C.  29 USC §201 et seq.

D.  7 USC §136 et seq. (1996), Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA).

E.  Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended.

 

4.  References.

A.  USGS Physical Security Handbook, SM 440-2-H.

B.  USGS Volunteers for Science Handbook.

C.  Interagency Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials Handbook, Department of the Interior and USDA-Forest Service, located at:  http://amd.nbc.gov/safety/library/hazmathb0105.pdf.

D.  The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) List of Registered Bear Deterrents containing capsaicin (regulated under FIFRA) located at: http://www.epa.gov/region8/toxics/pests/beardeter.html.

E.  Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee (IGBC) Bear Spray Recommendations located at: http://www.igbconline.org/html/safety.html.

F.  Manufacturers of bear deterrents, e.g., Counter AssaultÓ Instructor Training Course.

G.  Other Federal and State laws pertaining to bear spray use, handling, transport, and storage.

 

5.  Definitions.

A.  Employee.  USGS employees, volunteers covered by a properly executed USGS Form 9-2080, Individual Volunteer Services Agreement, and students acquired by purchase orders citing Public Law 106-113 as the authority for the award.

B.  Bear Spray.  Spray specifically designed for protection against wild animal attacks.

 

6.  Safety Training Requirements.

A.  Employees must meet the following minimum training standards before being certified to carry and/or use bear spray:

(1)  Successful completion of a USGS-approved bear spray training course.  Local management will maintain files containing bear spray training records for their employees who attend USGS

bear spray or other USGS-approved bear spray courses.  Completion of the training must also be documented through the Department of Interior Learning Management System (DOI LEARN).

(2)  The bear spray training shall include hands-on demonstrations and exercises that emphasize safe bear spray use.  For employees taking training via CD-ROM or on-line, this requirement may be met by conduct of a practice spray using an inert canister demonstrating methods of use, holstering, deployment, arming/applying, and disarming in accordance with the directions for method of use in the Bear Spray Student Training Manual.

(3)  Bear spray training may be presented as a part of other safety courses, including USGS firearms safety and animal behavior courses.

(4)  The following topics shall be covered in any USGS-approved bear spray course (see Appendix 46-1, Bear Spray Training Standards):

(a)  General Bear Spray Safety.

(b)  Bear Spray Use in the Field.

(c)  Responsibilities Associated with Bear Spray Training, Issuance, and Use.

(d)  EPA Registration of Bear Spray.

(e)  Bear Spray Chemistry, Characteristics, and Delivery Systems.

(f)  Post-Exposure Treatment.

(g)  Comparison of Bear and Personal Defense Spray.

(h)  Comparison of Bear Spray versus other Methods of Wildlife Protection.

(i)  Defensive Mindset for Defense against Wild Animals.

(j)  Appropriate Practical Exercises.

(5)  Upon review and approval of employee curricula, the Bureau Firearms Safety Program Manager may offer or approve reciprocity to bear spray courses provided by other entities.  As a minimum, any USGS-approved bear spray course must cover the bear spray training standards specified in Appendix 46-1.  Any contracted instructor shall work directly with the Bureau or Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager to ensure that the training is relevant to the objectives of the USGS.

B.  Instructors.

(1)  Instructors who teach bear spray courses to USGS employees shall be certified by the Bureau or Regional Safety Program Manager and must successfully complete the following training elements:

(a)  Bear Spray Course for Defense against Wild Animals.

(b)  Bear Spray Instructor (BSI) Course or similar accredited pepper spray instructor course.

(c)  An accredited, non-Government pepper spray instructor training course can suffice for certification if approved by the Bureau or Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager.

(d)  In addition to the above training, all USGS BSI must be able to demonstrate the ability to independently and effectively teach the fundamentals of bear spray safety and usage.

(2)  USGS employees who serve as assistant bear spray instructors and instructor candidates shall have successfully completed the appropriate bear spray course and have demonstrated proficiency in the safe use and handling of bear spray.

(3)  Prior to approving, the Bureau or Regional Firearms Safety Program Manager shall evaluate non-USGS bear spray courses to ensure that they meet the criteria of Appendix 46-1, and that:

(a)  Adequate bear spray student manuals or texts are provided.  The USGS Bear Spray Student Manual is accessible via the USGS CD ROM Bear Spray Training and/or the USGS Firearms Safety Website.

(b)  All instructors have certification in good standing from a reputable organization that is recognized in the industry as a provider of bear spray training for instructors in non-law enforcement applications.

(c)  Offers a curriculum that contains lesson plans that stress the potential hazards and post-exposure treatment associated with bear spray training and use.

(d)  Provides a curriculum that establishes and implements appropriate safeguards to minimize the risks and liabilities to both students and instructors.

 

7.  Record Keeping.  Local management will maintain files containing:

A.  Bear Spray Certificate of Need/Completion of Training for Use/Issuance of Bear Spray (see Appendix 46-2) for all employees who attend USGS bear spray or other USGS-approved bear spray courses.  Completion of the training must also be documented through DOI LEARN.

B.  Bear Spray Discharges.

(1)  Any discharge resulting in injury or property damage will be reported to the appropriate Bureau or Regional Firearms Safety Manager.

(2)  Bear spray accidents or incidents that involve injury or property damage will be recorded in accordance with Chapter 7, Incident/Accident Reporting and Serious Accident Investigation, of this handbook.

 

8.  Bear Spray Use, Storage, Shipping, Transport, and Disposal.

A.  All field employees carrying bear spray shall be provided with unused canisters.  Partially discharged canisters should only be used as a back-up to unused canisters or for the Bear Spray Training Program.

B.  Only bear spray that specifically meets IGBC recommendations for defense against bears or other wildlife shall be used. 

C.  Annual chemical inventories shall include bear spray.

D.  All bear spray not being used in the field or under the direct control of a trained and certified employee shall be stored in a locked flammable chemical storage cabinet in accordance with USGS Physical Security Handbook, 440-2-H (10-4 to 10-7).  Bear spray shall not be stored in employee offices or in other unsecured areas.

E.  Bear spray is classified as a hazardous good and may not be delivered by regular mail.  Bear spray can only be shipped as Other Regulated Materials – Domestic (ORM-D). 

F.  The minimum volume for bear spray canisters is 7.9 ounces and, therefore, may not be legally transported in checked luggage.  Bear spray may be shipped by ground or air by a certified hazardous materials carrier.

G.  The pilot of DOI-sanctioned aircraft must be notified verbally of all hazardous materials loaded aboard the aircraft and the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods must indicate U.S. Department of Transportation exemption number 9198 in the authorizations column of the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods.

H.  In accordance with the DOI Interagency Aviation Transport of Hazardous Materials Handbook, employees are allowed to transport bear spray aboard field aircraft for official purposes.  The bear spray must be transported in a container/canister wrapped in cloth/foam and placed in a box or commercially available transport container specifically designed for bear spray to eliminate unintentional discharges.

I.  Employees who are authorized to use bear spray in the field as a part of their duties shall follow all State and municipal laws concerning the transportation and mode of carry of bear spray in motor vehicles.  In vehicles designed with separate passenger and storage compartments, bear spray shall not be transported in the passenger compartment.  During transport, canisters shall be wrapped in cloth/foam and placed in a box or commercially available transport container specifically designed for bear spray to eliminate unintentional discharges.

J.  All bear spray canisters shall be replaced as recommended by the manufacturer and based on maximum shelf life.  Outdated, unused, or dented canisters may only be used for training purposes.  All bear spray in local inventories shall be labeled with date of purchase.

K.  Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendation and State and local laws for disposal.  Bear spray should not be arbitrarily emptied in field locations as the bear spray is an attractant.

L.  Report lost or stolen bear spray immediately to a supervisor. 

 

9.  Responsibilities.

A.  Bureau Safety Manager.

(1)  Designates an individual as the responsible person for all bear spray training and certification activities within USGS, i.e., the Bureau Firearms Safety Manager (BFSM).

(2)  Establishes a Bureau Firearms Safety Committee to advise the Bureau DASHO and BSM on all bear spray issues, reviews all accidents related to bear spray inclusive of accidental discharges, and makes recommendations to prevent recurrence of similar accidents.

(3)  Provides final concurrence on substitutions to other bear spray training programs after review and approval by the Bureau Firearms Safety Committee and the Bureau Firearms Safety Manager.

(4)  Provides administrative support to the BFSM as appropriate.

B.  Bureau Firearms Safety Manager (BFSM).

(1)  Develops and recommends bear spray related policies for review by the Bureau Firearms Safety Committee.

(2)  Oversees all USGS bear spray training programs.

(3)  Serves as an advisor to the Bureau Safety Manager, Regional Firearms Managers, and bear spray instructors on all bear spray related issues.

(4)  Reviews all accidents, incidents, and notifications of discharges related to bear spray.

C. Regional Firearms Safety Manager (RFSM).

(1)  Oversees all regional bear spray activities.

(2)  Serves as the principle bear spray technical expert in their respective region.

(3)  Coordinates regional bear spray training activities in conjunction with regional program management.

(4)  Oversees all regional bear spray training programs including contracted training and monitors all to ensure consistency, accuracy, content, and overall quality.

(5)  Maintains regional bear spray training records as appropriate.

(6)  Serves as an advisor to the Regional Safety Manager on all bear spray issues.

D.  Supervisor.

(1)  Authorizes use of bear spray as part of an employee’s official duties using the Bear Spray Certificate of Need/Completion of Training for Use/Issuance of Bear Spray (see Appendix 46-2).

(2)  Authority to approve an employee's training, issuance, and use of bear spray shall be contingent upon the supervisor's knowledge of the employee’s needs and training in bear spray safety.

E.  Collateral Duty Safety or Environmental Program Coordinators shall be responsible for overseeing the disposal of old or damaged bear spray canisters.

F.  Employee.

(1)  Shall complete the appropriate bear spray safety training courses and remain up to date with all training requirements as specified in this chapter.  Documentation of training shall be through completion of a Bear Safety Certificate of Need/Completion of Training for Use/Issuance of Bear Pepper Spray (see Appendix 46-2).

(2)  Shall ensure that bear spray is used and carried in such a manner as to eliminate the possibility of an injury. 

(3)  Follows all guidelines for bear spray shipping and storage.

G.  Bear Spray Safety Instructor.

(1)  Serves as a bear spray technical expert for their respective office or center.

(2)  Maintains local bear spray training records.

(3)  Coordinates training activities in conjunction with the Regional Firearms Safety Manager.

(4)  Maintains a level of instructional and technical proficiency as described in this chapter.

(5)  Teaches the USGS-approved bear spray courses.

Appendix 46-1: USGS Bear Spray Training Standards

 

 

______/s/ Karen D. Baker_______________________                     __2/16/09_________

Karen D. Baker                                                                                 Date
Associate Director for Administrative Policy and Services

 

 

CHAPTER 47

Reserved for future content.

 

 

CHAPTER 48

Prevention of Cold Stress Injuries

Instruction: New chapter.

 

1.  Purpose.  To establish policy for employees working in cold conditions that may increase susceptibility to cold stress effects and injuries. 

 

2.  References.

A.  Threshold Limit Values (TLVs ®) and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs ®) Based on the Documentation of the Threshold Limit Values for Chemicals Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, current edition.

 

3.  Scope.  This policy applies to U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and those who work under USGS funding or direction.

 

4.  Requirements

A.  Evaluate the work environment for cold stress conditions using a job hazard analysis (JHA).  Refer to Appendix A, Table 1: Wind Chill Temperature Index or an equivalent wind chill index to evaluate cold stress conditions.

B.  Develop and implement local written procedures to protect employees from cold stress injuries to include the following, at a minimum:

(1)  Worksite or operational description where employees may be exposed to potential cold stress environments and the respective JHA.

(2)  Required preventive procedures and equipment to prevent cold stress injuries; e.g., protective cold weather clothing and equipment, worker rotation schedules and warm-up shelters.

(3)  Site specific training requirements for employees, students, and volunteers about the dangers of exposure to cold environments; i.e., cool temperatures, cool rainy weather, cold water immersion, etc., that can result in cold stress injuries and the measures to prevent cold stress injuries.

(4)  First-aid response to cold stress injuries including recognizing symptoms, treatment, and local emergency medical contact information.

C.  Employees shall replace wet clothing when working in cold conditions.

D.  Exposed skin shall be protected when frostbite conditions exist.  (Refer to Appendix A, Table 1: Wind Chill Temperature Index.)

E.  Heated shelters; e.g., rooms, tents, cabins, vehicles, etc.; and warm-up schedules or alternative protections shall be addressed in local written procedures and JHA when working in conditions where the equivalent wind chill temperature is continuously less than 20

F.  (See Appendix A, Table 2: Work/Warm-up Guidelines.)

F.  Training shall be provided to all employees working in cold conditions.  Training shall include at a minimum:

(1)  The types of cold stress injuries and how to recognize the signs of symptoms of the onset of hypothermia, excessive cooling, and other cold stress injuries.  (A list of the most common cold stress injuries, their symptoms, and treatment are provided in Appendix B.)

(2)  The recognition and evaluation of cold stress conditions.

(3)  Procedures and practices established to prevent cold stress injuries including proper rewarming procedures.

(4)  Proper personal protective equipment and clothing.

(5)  Proper hydration and nutrition.

(6)  Medical treatment required for common cold-weather injuries to include initial first aid and when to seek professional medical help. 

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs cold stress injury prevention program activities through the Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO).  The Associate Director for Administration serves as the Bureau DASHO.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to local sites to implement and comply with the hazard communication program.

(2)  Ensure managers and supervisors are accountable and comply with statutory, regulatory, and Bureau program requirements.

(3)  Ensure program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Bureau DASHO - Associate Director for Administration.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective cold stress injury prevention program within the Bureau.

(2)  Assigns cold stress injury prevention program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services (OMS) for program management and administration.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Assigns cold stress injury prevention program responsibilities for Bureau program management and administration to the Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(2)  Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities cold stress injury prevention program needs.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager

(1)  Provides policy development and oversight of the cold stress injury prevention program.

(2)  Assists national program staff and regional safety managers with the necessary support and guidance to effectively fulfill cold stress injury prevention program policy commitments.

(3)  Ensures the evaluation of national and regional organizations every 3 years to assess the effectiveness and implementation of the cold stress injury prevention program, in accordance with SM–445–2–H.5 Program Evaluations.

(4)  Conducts external audits of national programs to include auditing compliance with hazard communication program requirements.

F.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Provide region-wide direction and oversight of the cold stress injury prevention program, serving as the focal point for local procedure development and implementation and providing technical advice to field collateral duty safety program coordinators.

(2)  Assist local management in developing and implementing local written procedures for preventing cold stress injuries and coordinating employee training upon request.

(3)  Evaluate the implementation effectiveness of the cold stress injury prevention requirements, during inspections, and make recommendations for improvement.

G.  Managers/Supervisors.

(1)  Ensure that local written procedures are developed and adequate resources are available to fully implement cold stress injury prevention requirements at the locality.

(2)  Ensure that all employees assigned to perform work in cold conditions are trained in and are aware of:

(a)  The types of conditions and work environments where cold stress injuries are likely to occur.

(b)  The types and prevention methods of cold stress injuries that may occur under such conditions.

(c)  Rescue and first-aid procedures should a cold stress injuries occur.

(3)  Identify all work activities and locations where employees could be susceptible to cold stress injuries and evaluate the work environment for cold stress conditions through the development of a JHA.

(4)  Ensure that local written procedures are implemented that continually assess local temperatures, wind chill factors and level of employee activity.

(5)  Document cold stress incidents or injuries in the Safety Management Information System.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist managers in establishing and implementing cold stress injury prevention requirements, including assisting in evaluating the work environment for cold stress conditions training and developing local written procedures.

(2)  Provide input to managers on the status of compliance with cold stress injury prevention requirements at the locality.

I.  Employees.

(1)  Follow the cold stress injury prevention requirements.

(2)  Participate in cold stress injury prevention training and be familiar with the hazards associated with working in cold stress conditions and the signs and symptoms of overexposure to the cold.  Information about common cold stress injuries, initial first aid, and when to seek professional medical help is provided in Appendix B.

(3)  Keep track of the local temperature and wind chill factor and moderate activity based on the cold.

(4)  Report any cold stress injuries to your supervisor.

Appendix 48-A: Wind Chill Temperature Index

 

Appendix 48-B: Common Cold Stress Injuries, Symptoms, and Treatment

 

Katherine McCulloch /s/________________________________                9/19/2014_________
Katherine McCulloch                                                                                     Date 
Acting Deputy Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 49

Large Vessel Safety Management Program

Instruction: This chapter is revised to reflect the organizational realignment.

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify requirements for the safe operation of the Bureau’s large vessels greater than or equal to 26 feet "length over all" (LOA) and for the training and qualifications of large vessel operators and crew.

 

2.  References.  

A.  The large vessel safety management program conforms to the 46 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Sub-Chapter C, part 28, "Requirements for Commercial Fishing Industry Vessels," and other appropriate regulations and standards as defined in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Large Vessel Safety Management System (SMS) Manual.  

B.  Deviations from the requirements of this chapter are not permitted except as specifically described in this chapter.

 

3.  Requirements.

A.  Large Vessel Safety Management System.

(1)  All Science Centers that own and operate large vessels shall implement a large vessel SMS that provides sufficient information and guidance to mitigate hazards encountered during field operations and at the dock.  The large vessel SMS is designed to be used as both a manager’s reference and maintained onboard as a reference for any vessel that requires a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) licensed operator.

(2)  Large vessel SMS shall be tailored after the following chapters/contents and meet/exceed requirements established within the USGS Large Vessel Safety Management System Manual:

(a)  Chapter 1 Introduction.

(b)  Chapter 2 Safety and Environmental Protection Policy.

(c)  Chapter 3 Center Responsibility and Authority.

(d)  Chapter 4 Designated Persons.

(e)  Chapter 5 Master’s Responsibility.

(f)  Chapter 6 Resources and Personnel.

(g)  Chapter 7 Vessel Operating Procedures.

(h)  Chapter 8 Emergency Preparedness.

(i)  Chapter 9 Reporting Procedures.

(j)  Chapter 10 Maintenance Inspection Criteria References.

(k)  Chapter 11 Documentation.

(l)  Chapter 12 Science Center Verification and Reviews.

B.  Exceptions to Large Vessel Operation Requirements.

(1)  Deviation from the requirements of large vessel written policy may be permitted for special mission requirements such as emergency response or special law enforcement operations. 

(2)  Emergency policy deviations shall be authorized by the Science Center Director, documented in writing, with a copy forwarded to the Large Vessel Safety Program Manager (LVSPM) and the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program Manager.

(3)  Non-emergency policy deviations shall be requested in writing by the respective Science Center Director and forwarded to the LVSPM for approval, to include a justification for alternate/equivalent safety measures to be taken.  A copy shall be forwarded to the OSH Program Manager.

C.  Operators.

(1)  Operators of large vessels shall be required to hold a USCG license appropriate for the vessel and route.

(2)  Minimum licensing requirements for vessels 26 feet to 45 feet LOA shall be Operator of Uninspected Passenger Vessels, dependent on LOA, mission, route, number of individuals required to man, and tonnage.

(3)  Operators of vessels 45 feet LOA and greater shall be required to hold a Master level license.

(4)  A Master or Captain shall be designated in writing for each large vessel.

 

4.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and large vessel safety management program criteria.

(2)  Holds the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official (DASHO), Associate Directors, and Regional Directors accountable for effectively fulfilling large vessel safety management program responsibilities within region, mission area, or office.

(3)  Delegates sufficient authority to the DASHO to effectively manage and administer the large vessel safety management program. 

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Provide adequate staff and funding resources to effectively implement and administer the large vessel safety management program within their respective region, mission area, or office.  (Reference 29 CFR 1960.7.)

(2)  Require compliance with statutory, regulatory, and large vessel safety management program criteria and hold managers and supervisors accountable for effectively fulfilling program responsibilities.

C.  Designated Safety and Health Official.  Directs large vessel safety management program activities through the Chief, Office of Management Services (OMS), and ensures that adequate staff and funding resources are provided to develop and administer the program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Provides sufficient authority and resources to effectively support and represent the interests of the USGS in the oversight, management and administration of the large vessel safety management program.

E.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Provides for the establishment of a Large Vessel Safety Management Committee, which advises the Bureau DASHO through ad hoc membership on the Bureau OSH Council to address all large vessel issues.

(2)  Participates or designates a representative on the Large Vessel Safety Management Committee.

(3)  Provides administrative support to the large vessel safety management program manager and Large Vessel Safety Management Committee as appropriate.

(4)  Collaborates with the LVSPM on staffing levels to determine effectiveness in establishing and implementing the large vessel safety management program. 

F.  Specialized Safety Programs Section Chief.

(1)  Provide large vessel safety management program oversight, administration, budget coordination and supervision of the LVSPM.

(2)  Collaborates with LVSPM on the large vessel safety management program policies, goals, and annual program plans and accomplishments.

(3)  Serves as the OSH Program manager designee on the large vessel safety management committee.

(4)  Provides support, oversight, and supervision for the LVSPM.

G.  Large Vessel Safety Program Manager.

(1)  Serves as the technical expert on large vessel safety management issues.

(2)  Serves as the Large Vessel Safety Committee (LVSC) chair.  The LVSC serves as a forum for peer group discussion of large vessel safety management issues and to provide policy and program recommendations and other input to the Bureau OSH Council and DASHO.  The LVSPM is responsible for the coordination of meetings and agendas and publishing minutes.

(3)  Participates on the Bureau OSH Council.

(4)  Maintains a high level of technical proficiency regarding large vessel safety management issues.

(5)  Serves as the USGS representative on large vessel safety management issues requiring coordination with the DOI, other DOI Bureaus, and other Federal agencies.

(6)  Conducts required SMS vessel inspections and management audits to ensure compliance with the SMS and documents in the Inspection and Abatement System.

(7)  Coordinates with the LVSC to compile a fiscal year program action/accomplishment plan and submits annually to the OSH Program Manager.

(8)  Maintains program management and document control for the SMS.

(9)  Completes an annual large vessel safety management policy self-assessment within the DOI Safety Management Information System (SMIS).

(10)  Serves as lead investigator for large vessel accidents involving serious injury or major property damage.  Reviews SMIS large vessel accident reports to identify any trends and make recommendations for control.

(11)  Provides final written approval for “non-emergency” deviations or waivers to large vessel or SMS requirements.

H.  Large Vessel Safety Committee.

(1)  Develops, maintains, and recommends basic large vessel safety management program standards for the USGS.

(2)  Develops or endorses specialized training curricula specific to USGS large vessel-based operations.

(3)  Reviews and evaluates Federal instructions and regulations for impact on large vessel operations and develops recommendations and proposes alternatives for implementing compliance programs.

(4)  Evaluates and recommends large vessel safety equipment.

(5)  Provides a forum to ensure communication and resource sharing across the Bureau.

I.  Science Center Directors, Cost Center Managers, and Project Chiefs.

(1)  Provide appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to ensure the establishment of a local large vessel safety management program to include:

(a)  Operator training.

(b)  Periodic inspection and maintenance.

(c)  Personal protective clothing and other equipment as necessary for the safe operation of large vessels in all conditions.

(d)  Provide person(s) with large vessel expertise to participate as member(s) of the LVSC.

(e)  Appoint a Large Vessel Designated Person to carry out the Center’s onshore responsibility and authority for the SMS.

(2)  Authorize and document “emergency only” deviation/waiver to SMS policy for special mission requirements such as emergency response or special law enforcement operations.  Provide a copy of the deviation/waiver to the LVSPM.

J.  Large Vessel USCG Licensed Operator, Master, Captain.

(1)  Implements the USGS Large Vessel Safety Management System Manual as the minimum operational guideline for vessels 26 feet LOA or greater.

(2)  Has sole authority to make final decisions with regard to the safety of the vessel and crew.

(3)  Serves on the LVSC as needed.

K.  Large Vessel Designated Person.

(1)  Assists the Science Center Director, Cost Center Managers, Project Chiefs, and Large Vessel USCG Licensed Operator/Master with implementation of the SMS.

(2)  Monitors the safety and pollution prevention aspects of the operation of large vessel.

(3)  Ensures vessel inspections and management audits are completed for compliance with SMS and documents appropriately.

 

 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                             November 5, 2015
                                                                                               ______________________
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                      Date
Associate Director for Administration                                                                                       

 

 

CHAPTER 50

Non-ionizing Radiation

Instructions:  This is a new chapter to address safety and health requirements for non-ionizing radiation sources within the U.S. Geological Survey. 

 

1.  Purpose.  To specify the minimum Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program requirements for protecting U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees and the public from adverse exposure to non-ionizing radiation.

 

2.  Scope.  This chapter applies to USGS employees and others for whom the Government assumes workers’ compensation liability and who conduct activities involving the use of equipment and systems producing non-ionizing radiation or who may be exposed to non-ionizing radiation during work activities.  This chapter applies to non-ionizing radiation that includes sub-radiofrequency, radiofrequency, and microwave radiation; infrared, ultraviolet, and high intensity visible light; and laser radiation.

 

3.  References.

A.  Public Law 91-596 Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (The Act), Section 19.

B.  Executive Order 12196 Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

C.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.97 Non-Ionizing Radiation.

D.  OSHA 29 CFR 1926.54 Non-Ionizing Radiation

E.  Department Manual Part 485 Chapter 21 Radiation Safety – Ionizing and Non-ionizing 
Radiation

F.  U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Radiological Health Regulations (21 CFR 1040, Performance Standards for Light Emitting Products).

G.  American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs), Electromagnetic Radiation Fields (latest edition).

H.  American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/ Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) C95.1, IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz.

I.  IEEE SA-C95.3.1 Recommended Practice for Measurements and Computations of Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields with Respect to Human Exposure to Such Fields, 0 Hz to 100 kHz.

J.  IEEE Std C95.7 IEEE Recommended Practice for Radio Frequency Safety Programs, 3 KHz to 300 GHz.

K.  ANSI Z136.1 American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers.

L.  ANSI Z136.6 American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors.

M.  Static magnetic fields: International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), “Guidelines on Limits of Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields,” Health Physics, vol. 66, January 1994, p. 100-106.21.

N.  Federal Communications Commission (FCC)Office of Engineering & Technology (OET) Evaluating Compliance with FCC Guidelines for Human Exposures to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields, OET Bulletin 65, Edition 97-01, August 1997.

 

4.  Definitions

A.  Electromagnetic Radiation.  Waves of electric and magnetic energy moving together (radiating) through space at the speed of light.

B.  Infrared Light.  Electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light that extends from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 0.74 micrometers (µm) to 300 µm.

C.  Laser.  Device that emits light (electromagnetic radiation) through a process of optical amplification based on the stimulated emission of photons.  The term "laser" originated as an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation.

D.  Microwave Radiation.  Electromagnetic waves with wavelengths ranging from one millimeter to one meter, or equivalently, with frequencies between 300 megahertz (MHz) and 300 gigahertz (GHz).

E.  Non-ionizing Radiation (NIR).  Radiation having enough energy to excite atoms (make them move more rapidly) but not enough to ionize them (alter them physically).  Examples of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation include microwaves, radio waves, lasers, and visible light.

F.  Radiofrequency Radiation.  Generally defined as the part of the electromagnetic spectrum where electromagnetic waves have frequencies in the range of about 3 kilohertz (kHz) to 300 GHz.

G.  Restricted Area.  An area or room where access is controlled to protect individuals from exposure to non-ionizing radiation hazards.

H.  Sub-radiofrequency Radiation.  The part of the electromagnetic spectrum where electromagnetic waves have frequencies less than 30 kHz.

I.  Ultraviolet Light.  Electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than visible light, but longer than X-rays, from 10 nanometers (nm) to 400 nm with corresponding photon energies from 3 electron volts (eV) to 124 eV.

J.  Visible Light.  Electromagnetic radiation that is visible to the human eye with wavelengths from about 380 nanometers (nm) to about 740 nm.  This range is between the invisible infrared, with longer wavelengths and the invisible ultraviolet, with shorter wavelengths.

 

5.  Requirements.

A.  The USGS will:

(1)  Establish programs and controls that comply with national consensus standards and regulations, control and prevent non-ionizing radiation hazards, and ensure employee and public exposures are maintained as low as practicable, but at no time exceeding the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs).  At a minimum, program elements must include hazard assessment; controls to eliminate or reduce hazards such as engineering controls, administrative controls, or personal protective; appropriate instruction or training; and periodic evaluation of the effectiveness of the program.

(2)  Ensure that potential non-ionizing radiation hazards are properly identified  and evaluated to determine and implement appropriate hazard controls such as engineering, administrative, and work practice controls, and the use of personal protective equipment, where applicable.

(3)  Use methods such as warning signs, physical barriers, and locks procedures to prevent access to restricted areas and accidental exposures to harmful quantities of non-ionizing radiation.

(4)  Maintain and periodically update an inventory of non-ionizing radiation hazard areas and non-ionizing radiation sources.
 
(5)  Evaluate non-ionizing radiation sources.  Measurement procedures and techniques recommended in IEEE C95.3 may be used as basic guidance for evaluating radiofrequency hazards.  Notify affected employees of any survey and measurement results and of non-ionizing radiation equipment and hazard areas.

(6)  Inspect non-ionizing radiation sources at least annually and survey if modifications were made.

(7)  Ensure that all employees potentially exposed to non-ionizing radiation receive appropriate safety training commensurate with hazards from non-ionizing radiation sources they use, maintain, or otherwise encounter.  
 
(8)  Investigate all incidents related to actual or suspected non-ionizing radiation exposures.  Investigations shall address results of non-ionizing radiation measurements, including detailed descriptions of circumstances leading to the incident, and make recommendations to prevent future reoccurrence.  
 
(9)  Follow guidelines in ANSI Z136.1 and Z136.3 and establish laser safety committees as applicable.

(10)  Establish a medical surveillance program for users of Class IIIB and IV lasers and those who perform maintenance of Class IIIB and IV lasers.

(11)  Ensure that repair, maintenance, and alignment of non-ionizing radiation equipment is conducted by a trained and qualified individuals.  Only a qualified expert will design, review, and test controls for access to a Class IIIB or IV laser.  A qualified expert will design or review for adequacy all laser safety standard operating procedures for each such facility.

(12)  Maintain records of, including but not limited to, surveys, exposures, training, maintenance, and audits.

(13)  Assess local compliance with program activities annually.

(14)  Assess national capabilities and regional non-ionizing radiation program compliance every 3 years in conjunction with the overall national capabilities and regional occupational safety and health program evaluations.

(15)  Ensure that radiofrequency and microwave equipment is reviewed and approved for use by the Radio Project Management Office prior to purchase.

 

6.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.

(1)  Ensures compliance with statutory and regulatory policy and non-ionizing radiation protection program requirements.

(2)  Provides the resources and staff support necessary for the successful implementation of a non-ionizing radiation protection program.

B.  Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director by providing support and monitoring compliance with the non-ionizing radiation protection program.

(2)  Provides pertinent information concerning the Bureau non-ionizing radiation program to the Departmental Designated Agency Safety and Health Official or the designee upon request.

C.  Associate Directors/Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that personnel and financial resources are provided to implement non-ionizing radiation protection programs under their purview.

(2)  Hold managers and supervisors accountable for ensuring non-ionizing radiation activities in their regional or national capabilities programs are conducted in accordance with regulations and established procedures.

(3)  Ensure program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

(4)  Ensure radio purchases are approved through USGS Radio Program Management Office.

(5)  Ensure radio equipment inventory, contracts, memorandums of understanding, and other applicable documents are current, accurate, and filed with USGS Radio Program Management Office.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services

(1)  Assigns non-ionizing radiation protection responsibilities to the Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for Bureau program management and administration.

(2)  Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities non-ionizing radiation protection implementation.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Advises and supports the Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official on non-ionizing radiation protection program responsibilities.

(2)  Oversees the implementation of the non-ionizing radiation protection program.

(3)  Develops policies and guidance on non-ionizing radiation and provides technical assistance and guidance to the Bureau in carrying out radiation protection program requirements.

(4)  Provides support, technical assistance, and direction to Office of Management Services (OMS) Operations in carrying out non-ionizing radiation program requirements.

(5)  Assesses non-ionizing radiation protection program compliance and implementation via the conduct of regional and national program evaluations every 3 years and provides management with recommendations for program improvement, as appropriate.

(6)  Acts as liaison with the Department of the Interior (DOI) Safety Council and represents Bureau non-ionizing radiation protection interests to DOI and OSHA.

(7)  Provides regional, national capabilities, and field level support, technical assistance, and direction for implementing program requirements for non-ionizing radiation activities.

(8)  Documents program evaluation and external audit findings and risk within the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS), while monitoring local abatement actions through closure.

H.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Assist regional science center managers and Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators in non-ionizing radiation protection program implementation. 

(2)  Assess regional science center non-ionizing radiation protection program compliance and implementation and document external audits and risk in the IAS and track abatement actions through closure.

(3)  Provide technical support and resource guidance to regional and local management and employees for implementing operational aspects of the non-ionizing radiation protection program.

I.  Science Center Directors and Line Supervisors.

(1)  Ensure that non-ionizing radiation activities are adequately budgeted for the successful implementation and continued improvement of the program.

(2)  Ensure that non-ionizing radiation activities are carried out in accordance with policies, regulations, and established procedures.

(3)  Ensure that all employees potentially exposed to non-ionizing radiation receive appropriate safety training commensurate with hazards from non-ionizing radiation sources they use, maintain, or otherwise encounter. 

(4)  Ensure that annual self-audits of non-ionizing radiation activities and operations are performed with findings documented in Inspection and Abatement System.

(5)  Ensure that findings and deficiencies of non-ionizing radiation activities are addressed and resolved in a timely manner.

(6)  Ensure that radiofrequency and microwave equipment is reviewed and approved for use by the Radio Project Management Office prior to purchase.

J.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.

(1)  Assist local management and employees in providing technical oversight and support in implementing non-ionizing radiation protection programs.

(2)  Perform self-audits of non-ionizing radiation activities and operations and record in the Inspection and Abatement System. 

K.  Employees.

(1)  Use non-ionizing radiation equipment in accordance with policies and established procedures.

(2)  Wear personal protective equipment when required.

(3)  Participate in the medical surveillance program, when required.

(4)  Report exposure incidents and near misses to supervisors to investigate.

(5)  Complete required training prior to performing non-ionizing radiation activities.

 

 

/s/ Karen D. Baker                                                                                              May 7, 2014
_________________________________________________                      _________________
Karen D. Baker                                                                                                           Date
Acting Associate Director for Administration and Human Capital 

 

 

CHAPTER 51

Industrial Hygiene Program

Instruction:  Chapter 51 is a new chapter established to describe the requirements for an Industrial Hygiene Program.

 

1.  Purpose.  This chapter provides requirements for a comprehensive Industrial Hygiene Program that identifies and assesses potential health risks of employee workplace exposures to chemical, biological, and physical agents, differentiates between acceptable and unacceptable exposures, controls unacceptable exposures, and provides a basis for implementing relevant medical surveillance and exposure control programs.

 

2.  Scope.  This chapter applies to all U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) employees, volunteers, and cooperators who perform tasks that generate health hazards or whose work environment contains health hazards.  The term “employees” used in this chapter shall include USGS employees and others for whom the Government assumes workers’ compensation liability.

 

3.  References.

A.  Executive Order 12196.

B.  Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, parts 1910, 1915, 1918, and 1926.

C.  U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Manual, Part 485, Safety and Occupational Health Program, Chapter 17, Industrial Hygiene (485 DM 17).

D.  TLVs® and BEIs®: Documentation of the Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), latest edition.

 

4.  Requirements.

A.  The Bureau shall identify, evaluate, and control occupational exposures to chemical, biological, and physical agents in the workplace or generated during tasks performed by employees.  Note: These agents are also referred to as health hazards in this chapter.  Physical agents include ergonomics, thermal stress, ultrasound, vibration, noise, infrasound, and low-frequency sound.

B.  Employee exposures to airborne contaminants and physical hazards, at a minimum, shall not exceed the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs).  Where an OSHA PEL is not available for a health hazard or where it has been determined by an industrial hygienist that the OSHA PEL is not protective, the ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) shall apply.  The goal is to maintain exposures to health hazards as low as practicable.  The ACGIH TLVs provide an industry accepted benchmark to achieving this goal.  Every reasonable effort should be made to achieve exposures below the ACGIH TLV for all applicable health hazards.

C.  Where the OSHA PEL and the ACGIH TLV are not available, industry accepted guidance and practices and consensus standards shall be used.  These include but are not limited to guidance and practices from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Requirements for ionizing and nonionizing radiation are found in SM 445–2–H.30 Ionizing Radiation Safety, and SM 445-2-H.50 Non-ionizing Radiation, respectively.

D.  The Bureau shall implement an occupational exposure assessment process for identifying and evaluating all occupational exposures and shall implement exposure controls for all unacceptable occupational exposures, e.g., above the PEL or TLV.  The exposure assessment strategy shall include:

(1)  Basic characterization of tasks and health hazard agents to determine potential exposure profiles (i.e., workplace survey).

(2)  Exposure monitoring, where applicable, to quantitatively measure exposures.

(3)  Assessment and determination of the exposure based on the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected.

(4)  Periodic reassessments, including follow-up exposure monitoring.

(5)  Documentation and communication of assessment results and exposure control recommendations.

(6)  Use of the DOI exposure assessment database to manage exposure assessment data and exposure risks.   

E.  The Industrial Hygiene Program shall also include special assessments or investigations of occupational health concerns, such as, but not limited to, indoor air quality, ventilation surveys, investigation of health effects and abnormal biological monitoring, and customer requests.

F.  Engineering controls shall be used as the primary means to control exposures below the PEL or TLV, as applicable, and prevent skin contact to hazardous agents.  When engineering controls are not feasible, administrative controls and work practices shall be used.  Personal protective equipment (for example, respirators, hearing protection, and protective clothing) shall be used when engineering, administrative, and work practice controls do not adequately reduce exposure below the PEL or TLV, as applicable.  Any equipment and (or) technical measures used for exposure control must be approved for each particular use by an industrial hygienist or other technically qualified person as determined by an Office of Management Services (OMS) Industrial Hygienist.

G.  Whenever respirators and other personal protective equipment are used, their use shall comply with the requirements in SM 445–2–H.18, Respiratory Protection and SM 445-2-H.26, Personal Protective Equipment.

H.  When exposures are both unacceptable and cannot be controlled by engineering or administrative controls and work practices, employees may be required to be included in a medical surveillance program as defined in SM 445–2–H.23 Medical Surveillance Program.  Other exposure control programs that may be required based on exposure assessments and other industrial hygiene evaluations are found in:

(1)  SM 445–2–H.19, Hearing Conservation Program.

(2)  SM 445–2–H.20, Hazard Communication Program.

(3)  SM 445–2–H.21, Laboratory Protection Program.

(4)  SM 445–2–H.22, Formaldehyde Protection Program.

(5)  SM 445–2–H.24, Lyme Disease Protection Program.

(6)  SM 445–2–H.25, Human Bloodborne Pathogens Protection Program.

 

5.  Responsibilities.

A.  Director.  Directs Industrial Hygiene Program activities through the Designated Agency Safety and Health Official, who, for the Bureau, is the Associate Director for Administration,

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.

(1)  Ensure that financial resources are provided to local sites to implement and comply with industrial hygiene program requirements.

(2)  Ensure managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with industrial hygiene requirements.

(3)  Ensure program deficiencies are abated in a timely manner.

C.  Bureau Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to establish, develop, direct, and manage an effective Industrial Hygiene Program within the Bureau.

(2)  Assigns Industrial Hygiene Program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services, for program management and administration.

(3)  Provides appropriate personnel and budgetary resources to establish and maintain a bureau-wide industrial hygiene program.

D.  Chief, Office of Management Services.

(1)  Assigns Industrial Hygiene Program responsibilities to the Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager for Bureau program management and administration.

(2)  Ensures OMS staff has sufficient authority, resources, and qualifications to effectively support regional and national capabilities industrial hygiene needs.

E.  Bureau Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager.

(1)  Ensures establishment, oversight, and assessment of the Industrial Hygiene Program.

(2)  Ensures development of industrial hygiene policy.

(3)  Requires compliance with statutory, regulatory, and Bureau program requirements and provides management with the necessary support and guidance to effectively fulfill Industrial Hygiene policy commitments.

(4)  Ensures the evaluation of regional and local implementation of the Industrial Hygiene Program every 3 years, in accordance with SM 445–2–H.5, Program Evaluations.

(5)  Acts as Bureau liaison to the DOI Occupational Safety and Health Council for industrial hygiene matters, representing Bureau interests.

(6)  Ensures establishment and tracking of performance metrics for the Industrial Hygiene Program.

(7)  Provides support for Industrial Hygiene Program initiatives, publications, and related activities.

(8)  Coordinate with respective Regional Safety Managers and with the national capabilities and facilities Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators to ensure local implementation of the Industrial Hygiene Program.

(9)  Provide opportunity and resources for professional development of staff industrial hygienists for continual development of knowledge and skills to ensure the qualifications necessary to perform at the level assigned.

(10)  Evaluate regional and national capabilities Industrial Hygiene Programs, every 3 years, in accordance with SM 445–2–H.5, Program Evaluations.

(11)  Ensure use of the DOI exposure assessment database, and ensure that industrial hygiene findings from inspections, program reviews, exposure assessments, exposure monitoring, special investigations, etc. are entered into the Inspection and Abatement System.

F.  Bureau Industrial Hygienist.

(1)  Develops Industrial Hygiene Program policy, direction, guidance, and protocols; proposes bureauwide program goals, objectives, and initiatives for adoptive consideration by respective management; develops core competencies and training requirements for industrial hygienists and industrial hygiene support personnel.

(2)  Monitors implementation and effectiveness of Industrial Hygiene Program policies, guidelines, and processes through periodic assessment of internal controls and an policy assessment of industrial hygiene requirements and responsibilities every 3 years to ensure the integrity of the program.

(3)  Provides technical assistance and guidance to Occupational Safety and Health Management Branch (OSHMB) Industrial Hygienists regarding the Industrial Hygiene Program.

(4)  Acts as Bureau Industrial Hygiene liaison to the DOI Industrial Hygiene Working Group and bureaus, representing Bureau interests.

(5)  Establishes and monitors OSHMB contracts and interagency agreements for industrial hygiene services.

(6)  Administers the DOI exposure assessment database.

(7)  Initiates bureau-level industrial hygiene data calls.

(8)  Provide industrial hygiene technical support to the field, regions, and national capabilities, such as, but not limited to, identifying potential health hazards, conducting exposure assessments and exposure monitoring, assisting in the development of site-specific procedures, assessing exposure control measures, providing industrial hygiene training, and responding to customer requests.

(9)  Ensure that employees who assist in performing exposure monitoring have the appropriate orientation and training; and provides technical oversight to the monitoring project.

(10)  Enter and maintain local exposure assessment data in the DOI exposure assessment database.

(11)  Enter industrial hygiene findings from program reviews, exposure assessments, sampling, special investigations, etc. into the Inspection and Abatement System.

(12)  Assist with periodic program evaluations in accordance with SM–445–2–H.5, Program Evaluations.

G.  Regional Safety Managers.

(1)  Ensure local implementation of the Industrial Hygiene Program.

(2)  Validate through inspections and external audits that exposures to chemical, biological, and physical agents in the workplace are evaluated and controlled.

(3)  Assist management and collateral in obtaining industrial hygiene services, such as, but not limited, to exposure assessments, training, special investigations, and exposure monitoring; in consultation with the OMS Operations Industrial Hygienists.

(4)  Track and ensure abatement of industrial hygiene findings in the Inspection and Abatement System (IAS).

H.  Science Center Managers and Supervisors.

(1)  Ensure that adequate funding resources are provided for control measures to abate occupational exposures to identified health hazards.

(2)  Ensure occupational exposures to chemical, biological, and physical agents in the workplace are evaluated through coordination with their respective Regional Safety Manager.

(3)  Ensure engineering controls, administrative and work practices, and personal protective equipment to control occupational exposures are utilized when required by regulations or policies.

(4)  Ensure that affected employees are informed of industrial hygiene evaluations and investigation results.

(5)  Investigate exposure events and enter the investigation and findings in the Safety Management Information System.

(6)  Ensure employees who conduct industrial hygiene exposure monitoring are appropriately trained, e.g., monitoring equipment operations and calibration, exposure monitoring protocols, etc.

(7)  Ensure center industrial hygiene findings are documented in the IAS.

I.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Assist organizational managers and supervisors in the implementation of the Industrial Hygiene Program.

K.  Employees.

(1)  Comply with requirements to use engineering controls, administrative and work practice controls, and personal protective equipment, where applicable.

(2)  Report to their supervisors or local safety coordinators any concerns regarding exposures or exposure events to chemical, biological, or other potentially hazardous substances.

 

​​​​​​​

Paul M. McEnrue /s/_____________________________    _8/22/2014_____
Paul M. McEnrue                                                                   Date
Acting Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 52

Youth Safety

Instruction:  Chapter 52 is a new chapter established to address safety requirements for minors.

 

1.  Purpose. 

A.  To establish occupational safety and health related policy and responsibilities for minors either employed by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) or acting as a volunteer.

B.  To define the safety information cooperating and partnering organizations must include in agreements or memorandums of understanding with the USGS.  

 

2.  Scope.

A.  This chapter applies to:

(1)  Anyone under the age of 18 who performs official work (volunteer or compensated) for the USGS.

(2)  Youth Program Participants under the age of 18.

B.  This chapter does not apply to contractors.  Contractors must comply with the safety and health clauses in their contract agreement and should be advised of the USGS restrictions listed in this chapter.

 

3.  References.

A.  Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970, Federal Agency Safety and Health Program (Public Law 91-596, Section 19).

B.  Youth Conservation Corps Act (16 U.S.C. 1701-1706).

C.  Government Organization and Employees – Services to Employees; 7901, Health Services Programs; 7902, Safety Programs; 7903, Protective Clothing and Equipment (5 U.S.C. 7901 -

7903).

D.  Executive Order 12196, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for Federal Employees.

E.  Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs (29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1960).

F.  485 DM 1, Safety and Health Program; Authority, Purpose, and Policy.

G.  485 DM 13, Safety and Health Training.

H.  USGS Volunteer for Science Handbook, 500-23-H.

I.  Fair Labor Standards Act: 29 CFR Part 570 – Child Labor Regulations, Orders and Statements of Interpretation.

J.  OSHA’s Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals.

 

4.  Definitions.

A.  Volunteer.  Services received from individuals or groups without salary or wage compensation.  Volunteers must sign a Volunteer Services Agreement (OF 301A) and the position task-specific Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) before beginning work.  For more information refer to the Volunteer for Science Handbook, 500-23-H.

B.  Youth Program Participants.  

(1)  Youth Organizations.  These are the organizations (such as the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts of America, and 4-H Clubs of America) that have a written agreement or memorandum of understanding with the Department of the Interior (DOI) or USGS.  Written agreements and memorandums of understanding must include the information in 52.5.D. 

(2)  Youth Partnerships.  These are the organizations with which the USGS partners such as the Student Conservation Association (SCA).  A SCA program participant is a high school or college age volunteer recruited through the SCA whose volunteer service is defined under a national agreement.  The agreement includes the information in 52.5.D. 

(3)  Youth Hiring Authorities.  Examples of this type of program include the Youth Conservation Corps and the USGS Pathways Programs.

(4)  Collegiate Partners.  Universities or colleges that have written agreements with the USGS for students or professors to provide research, labor, or other.  The written agreements must include the information in 52.5.D. 

C.  Signal Words.  https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs.html.  The signal word indicates the relative degree of severity of the hazard.

(1)  The signal words used in the GHS are "Danger" for the more severe hazards and Warning" for the less severe hazards.

(2)  Some lower-level hazard categories do not use signal words.  Only one signal word corresponding to the class of the most severe hazard should be used on a label.

 

5.  Requirements.  

A.  Conduct volunteer and youth program activities in a way that will prevent death, occupational illness, injury, or property damage and insure that minors do not actively participate in a hazardous occupation or work activity at the USGS.

B.  Project leaders and supervisors must ensure that volunteers and youth program participants have completed required occupational safety and health training prior to conducting assigned job tasks.

C.  Volunteers and youth program participants must adhere to the occupational safety and health requirements in this chapter and other relevant DOI and USGS occupational safety and health policies.  

D.  Include safety information in agreements or memorandums of understanding between cooperating and partnering organizations and the USGS.  This information must include what each party is responsible for:

(1)  Administering and paying workers’ compensation and tort claims.

(2)  Providing safety training to meet the minimum safety standards in USGS policies.

(3)  Providing personal protective equipment for job tasks that require it. 

(4)  Requiring detailed JHA to be completed and reviewed to insure the tasks the minor will be expected to perform are in compliance with this chapter, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and the Human Capital requirements.

(5)  Disclosing the hazards identified in the JHA to the minor and their guardian.

 

6.  General.

A.  Acceptable Youth Tasks/Activities.

(1)  Volunteers and youth program participants may only participate in job tasks where they have completed the appropriate training and certification requirements specific to the hazards of the tasks involved.

(2)  Minors may perform field work only as part of a group or team consisting of two or more USGS employees who accompany them at all times.

B.  Unacceptable Youth Tasks/Activities.

(1)  Persons under 18 years of age may not operate any motor vehicle that weighs more than 6,000 pounds (2,700 kilograms), regardless of who owns or leases it.

(2)  Persons under 18 years of age may not operate private vehicles when performing official business.

(3)  Certain Activities Based on Age.  The Fair Labor Standards Act sets a minimum age for certain occupations determined to be particularly hazardous or detrimental to the health or well-being of minors.  The minimum age standards can be found in 29 CFR Part 570 – Child Labor Regulations, Orders and Statements of Interpretation.

(4)  In addition to applying child labor laws in the utilization of minors, the USGS prohibits assigning duties to minors that involve any of the following or similar types of activities that might potentially constitute a hazard:

(a)  Underwater Diving.

(b)  Use of chemicals classified with the signal word "Danger" or “Warning” on a Safety Data Sheet or Label in accordance with OSHA Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals.  For a definition of the signal words see 52.4.C. of this chapter.

(i)  Minors may participate in supervised activities provided they use only chemicals classified as low hazard with no signal word, have supervisory approval, and are trained on and follow the occupational safety and health requirements of this chapter and other applicable DOI and USGS occupational safety and health policies and OSHA regulations.

(ii)  Minors may participate as observers in laboratory tours under fully supervised conditions.  
  
(c)  Activities that result in employee exposures requiring enrollment in a medical surveillance program as required by SM 445-2-H.23.

(d)  Exposure to radiation or biological hazards.

(e)  Riding in helicopters or unscheduled aircraft.

(f)  Driving Government-owned or leased motorized vehicles.

(g)  Operation of power-driven machinery or equipment; e.g., chain saws, power shop tools, rock crushers, drill rigs, specialized equipment or vehicles, etc.

(h)  Use of firearms, explosives, or incendiaries.

(i)  Traffic Control.

C.  Other Applicable Laws.

(1)  Federal laws that apply to our safety program for volunteers and youth program participants:

(a)  The Federal Employees Compensation Act (FECA) is a workers' compensation law administered by the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs in the U.S. Department of Labor.  FECA provides compensation benefits to civilian employees of the United States for disability due to personal injury sustained while working in the performance of duty or due to an employment-related disease.  FECA also provides for the payment of benefits to dependents if the injury or disease causes the employee's death.

(i)  Volunteers and participants in programs for hiring youth are considered employees for the purposes of FECA.  Supervisors, Project Leaders, and volunteers/youth program participants can get help filing injury compensation claims from the Workers’ Compensation Specialist. Supervisors must submit a Report of Accident/Incident for all work-related injuries in accordance with SM 445-2-H.7.

(ii)  Participants in youth organizations, youth partnerships, and collegiate partners are not considered employees for the purposes of FECA.

(b)  The Federal Tort Claims Act provides a way for persons to make claims against the U.S. Government for damage, loss, injury, or death caused by negligent or wrongful acts or omissions by any employee of the Government while acting within the scope of employment.

(i)  Volunteers and participants in programs for hiring youth are considered employees for the purposes of the Federal Tort Claims Act.

(ii)  Participants in youth organizations, youth partnerships, and collegiate partners are not considered employees for the purposes of the Federal Tort Claims Act.

 

7.  Responsibilities.  The responsibilities in SM 445-2-H.2 are applicable.  Additional youth specific responsibilities are listed below.

A.  Designated Agency Safety and Health Official.

(1)  Exercises the authority of the Director to develop, direct, and manage an effective Youth Safety Program within the USGS.

(2)  Assigns Youth Safety Program authority to the Chief, Office of Management Services (OMS) for program management and administration.

B.  Associate Directors and Regional Directors.  Ensure that managers and supervisors are accountable for ensuring compliance with youth safety policy requirements.

C.  Chief, Office of Management Services.  Assigns Youth Safety Program responsibilities to the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Program Manager.
D.  Occupational Safety and Health Program Manager
 
(1)  Ensures the establishment, oversight, and assessment of the Youth Safety Program.

(2)  Advises and coordinates with regional safety and mission area staff to facilitate program implementation of youth safety policy, initiatives, publications, and related activities.

(3)  Assists as necessary in evaluating hazardous activities, recommending appropriate controls, and developing JHAs that allow the youth programs to function safely.

(4)  Recommends additional occupational safety and health training for youth participants, as appropriate.

(5)  Advises Human Capital and managers of proper job placement for minors by determining suitability based on safety requirements. 

(6)  Ensures that mission area volunteer and youth program supervisors are trained in the methods for preventing accidents and illnesses and the procedures for outdoor work activities and how to assess operations for the risks they pose.

E. Regional Safety Managers.  Have the same responsibilities for their regions as 52.7E(2)-(6) above.

F.  Science Center Directors.  Ensure the safety of youth program participants and compliance with the youth safety policy.

G.  Science Center Managers, Supervisors, and Project Leaders.

(1)  Ensure that volunteers complete OF 301A that includes a position description describing work duties, hazards, and required personal protective equipment.

(2)  Ensure the completion of a hazard assessment, preparation of an emergency/rescue plan, and conduct of a pre-work briefing with all participants.

(3)  Complete JHA for tasks requiring them.  (See SM 445-2-H.15, Job Hazard Analyses.)

(4)  Ensure volunteer and youth program participants receive appropriate required occupational safety and health training per SM 445-2-H.14, Training prior to conducting the task/activity.  Managers and supervisors are encouraged to use the following National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) web sites as additional training resources for volunteer workers: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety and http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety/video.html.  The training must include:

(a)  Safety and health program requirements and how to assess operations for the risks they pose.

(b)  Safe operating procedures.

(c)  Using personal protective equipment and required clothing and knowing its limitations.

(d)  The site safety plan and procedures to follow in an emergency including procedures to immediately stop activities that are of imminent danger to individuals.

(5)  Comply with applicable DOI and USGS occupational safety and health requirements.

(6)  Request support from the Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinator, the Regional Safety Manager, or the OSH Program Manager to address complex safety and occupational health hazards.

(7)  Document initial and refresher volunteer and youth program participant training completions in the DOI Learning Management System; i.e., DOI Learn.

(8)  Immediately stop activities that are of imminent danger to individuals.

H.  Collateral Duty Safety Program Coordinators.  Assist science center managers, supervisors, and project leaders in complying with Departmental and USGS occupational safety and health requirements.

I.  Youth Participants.

(1)  Immediately report the following to their supervisor or the project leader:

(a)  All unsafe or unhealthful conditions that they observe.  (See SM 445-2-H.8.)

(b)  Job-related accidents that result in, or have the potential to result in, harm to people, damage to property, or a potential tort claim.

(c)  Any personal conditions that could adversely affect their ability to perform their jobs in a safe and healthful manner.

(2)  Complete required occupational safety and health training before conducting job tasks.

(3)  Wear USGS-provided personal protective equipment, when required.

(4)  Maintain a high degree of safety awareness to perform work without accident or injury.
 

/s/ Jose R. Aragon                                                                              August 5, 2015
                                                                                                            ____________            
Jose R. Aragon                                                                                               Date

Associate Director for Administration

 

 

CHAPTER 53

Reserved for future content.

 

 

CHAPTER 54

Glossary of Terms and Acronyms