Bay health impacted by record flows

Release Date:

Chesapeake Bay Program — by Dylan Reynolds — November 26, 2019

"In 2019, more fresh water flowed into the Chesapeake Bay than in any of the past 82 years. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, the average freshwater streamflow into the Bay over the past year was 130,750 cubic feet per second—the highest since data collection began in 1937. To put this into perspective, 130,750 cubic feet is about 978,077 gallons. In comparison, an average Olympic-sized swimming pool holds approximately 660,253 gallons of water. That’s more than one pool entering the Bay every second!

These historic flows, which followed the record-breaking rainfall seen in 2018, caused Bay-wide changes in salinity. The extreme rainfall also washed nutrient and sediment pollution into the Bay, which depleted dissolved oxygen that aquatic species depend on for survival, and dramatically impacted the Bay’s underwater grass habitat and other living resources. . ."

Read the full article at the Chesapeake Bay Program

 

« Return to Chesapeake Bay Activities — News