New Study: Water, Grazing, and a Threatened Amphibian – Oregon Spotted Frog

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A new study in the Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge in south-central Oregon examines how Oregon spotted frogs use habitat in grazed areas, and will evaluate seasonal water quality and sediment conditions in response to grazing.

Multiple amphibians of conservation concern, including Oregon spotted frogs (OSF), use habitats that are grazed in the western United States. OSF are highly aquatic and have declined in much of their historic range, prompting a need to understand how grazing relates to their status and recovery. Information about grazing effects on OSF and their habitat is mixed. USGS researchers are examining how OSF use habitat in grazed areas in the Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge in south-central Oregon, and evaluating seasonal water quality and sediment conditions in response to grazing. USGS researchers are also documenting the response of adult OSF to cattle movement and proximity. Information will help federal and private land managers evaluate and implement grazing while maintaining habitat for OSF and other amphibians.

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Date published: September 20, 2017
Status: Active

Herpetological Research Team (FRESC)

The Herpetological Research Team focuses on issues related to conservation and management of amphibians and other aquatic and semi-aquatic species. Among our current studies are effects of invasive species, disease, and land use change on the dynamics of amphibian communities to inform conservation and management decision making.