News Briefs - August-October 2017

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Coastal and marine news highlights from across the USGS

This article is part of the August-October 2017 issue of the Sound Waves newsletter.

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Filter Total Items: 15
Date published: October 25, 2017

Biologist starting over after Hurricane Irma damages home, office, research site

Coral reef expert Caroline Rogers was the only USGS employee in the Virgin Islands when the Category 5 storm hit.

Date published: October 10, 2017

USGS Tracks Evolution of a Fire Island Hurricane-Made Breach

A study finds that although the “wilderness breach” created by Hurricane Sandy in 2012 has reached a relatively stable size and location, the channel and shoals will keep changing in response to weather. Related research shows the breach isn’t likely to increase storm-tide flooding in Great South Bay.

Date published: October 7, 2017

USGS Installs Storm-Tide Sensors Along Gulf Coast for Hurricane Nate

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Nate, visit the USGS Hurricane Nate page at https://www.usgs.gov/nate. 

Date published: September 29, 2017

Annual Southern Sea Otter Survey: Despite Small Population Dip, Species Moves a Step Closer to Recovery

According to data released Friday by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners, the three-year average of the total counts of southern sea otters was down from last year’s high, although it still exceeded the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s delisting threshold for a second straight year.

Date published: September 26, 2017

Hurricane Maria expected to alter North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland Beaches

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Maria, visit the USGS Hurricane Maria page at https://www.usgs.gov/maria.

Date published: September 22, 2017

USGS Continues Response to Four Hurricanes

As thousands of people remain displaced by or are recovering from one of the four hurricanes that have affected the United States the past month, the U.S. Geological Survey is in the field providing science that will help with recovery from these historic hurricanes and with preparing for the next storm.

Date published: September 22, 2017

USGS Tidal Network Monitoring Elevated Water Levels Off Hampton Roads

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Jose, visit the USGS Hurricane Jose page at https://www.usgs.gov/jose.

Date published: September 13, 2017

USGS Measures the Impacts of Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma’s heavy rains and storm surge caused severe flooding in parts of the Southeast.

Date published: September 8, 2017

River Levels Set Records in Texas: USGS Continues to Monitor Rivers in the State Due to Flooding

Editor’s note: this news release will be updated online with more information on the streamgage records being set in Texas as it becomes available.

Rivers and streams reached record levels as a result of Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall, with about 40 U.S. Geological Survey streamgages measuring record peaks.

Date published: September 8, 2017

Hurricane Irma to significantly affect beaches from Florida to South Carolina

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Irma, visit the USGS Hurricane Irma page.

Date published: August 24, 2017

Many Texas Beaches Likely to Erode, Be Overwashed, or Inundated by Hurricane Harvey

To learn more about USGS’ role providing science to decision makers before, during and after Hurricane Harvey, visit the USGS Hurricane Harvey page.

UPDATE: This story has been revised to reflect new NOAA-National Hurricane Center storm surge projections which were released August 25 at 7 a.m.

Date published: August 23, 2017

Invasive Pest May Not Be Only Cause of Recent Louisiana Marsh Die-off

A non-native insect infestation may not be the only factor involved in the ongoing die-back of a marsh grass in the Mississippi River’s “bird foot delta,” the ecologically and economically important part of coastal Louisiana where the river meets the Gulf of Mexico.