Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - March 17, 2015

Release Date:

Re-establishing VLF eruption rate monitor

 

Re-establishing VLF eruption rate monitor...

After establishing an appropriate location to resume VLF measurements over the June 27th lava tube to estimate the cross-sectional area of lava within the tube, HVO geologists make the measurements, sometimes requiring walking through volcanic gases.

(Public domain.)

The VLF radio wave, transmitted from the Lualualei Naval Base on O‘...

The VLF radio wave, transmitted from the Lualualei Naval Base on O‘ahu, is received by the handheld device. The numbers are read and recorded. These data will allow the estimation of the cross-sectional area of lava within the tube.

(Public domain.)

HVO geologists still sample lava

Geologist collecting a fresh sample of a slow-moving lava flow at K...

HVO geologists get fresh lava samples as close to the vent as possible. Once the sample is scooped from the pāhoehoe lobe, it is quickly quenched in a bucket of water to stop the growth of any crystals and to preserve the composition of the liquid lava. Once cooled, the sample is sent first to UH Hilo for quick analysis of a few components and prepared for a fuller analysis of its chemical components by a lab on the mainland. These data are used, with HVO's geophysical monitoring data, as another way to assess any changes that may be occurring within Kīlauea volcano.

(Public domain.)

Blue-glass pāhoehoe

Blue-glass pāhoehoe...

First recognized in Kalapana in 1990, these pāhoehoe flows appear bluish with dense, glassy crusts. These lavas are generally observed later in the life of an inflated pāhoehoe flow. The degassed nature of the lava promotes the formation of solid glass, rather than bubbly, crusts. The bluish color may be the result of the natural iron and magnesium in the lava.

(Public domain.)

The upper end of the June 27th lava tube

The upper end of the June 27th lava tube...

Most of the ground work today was to establish the location and estimated size of the two lava tubes coming out of the June 27th vent area on the north flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone. The area in this image is between the cone's north flank and a perched pond that formed last summer (arc-shaped feature on the right side of the image). The visual image shows the general location of the main tube before it splits downslope.

(Public domain.)

The upper end of the June 27th lava tube

This infrared view of the area in Fig. 4a shows that the area is s...

This infrared view of the area in Fig. 4a shows that the area is still quite hot and the tube location is possibly obscured although the few hotter strands may be indicators of the tube's location.

(Public domain.)

March 09 breakout has reached the north tree line

March 09 breakout has reached the north tree line...

The March 09 breakouts, which issued from the vicinity of Pu‘u Kahauale‘a, has advanced northward (to the left) and reached the forest at the north edge of the Kahauale‘a flows and was burning vegetation along its edges. The most recent active pāhoehoe lobes from the February 21st breakout are visible in the foreground.

(Public domain.)

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater...

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater again hosts a small lava lake near its southern edge (lower left) in addition to a hornito in the northeast corner (near right edge of image) with several glowing holes at its top.

(Public domain.)

Active portion of the February 21st breakout

Active portion of the February 21st breakout...

pāhoehoe lobes continue to be active at the leading edge of the February 21st breakout.

(Public domain.)

The leading edge is completely inactive

The leading edge is completely inactive...

As reported since March 12, the leading edge just upslope of the Pahoa Marketplace, is inactive. The active breakouts noted today were more than 14 km (8.7 mi) straight-line distance from the Marketplace.

(Public domain.)