Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – May 26, 2021

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Kīlauea's summit is no longer erupting; lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has ceased and sulfur dioxide emissions have decreased to near pre-eruption background levels. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor for new changes from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand evolving processes at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

May 25, 2021 — Kīlauea

Halema‘uma‘u lava lake and west vent

On May 25, HVO field crews did not observe any active surface lava or incandescent areas within Halema‘uma‘u crater

During an eruption monitoring shift on May 25, HVO field crews did not observe any active surface lava or incandescent areas within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. Since the eruption began on December 20, 2020, over 40 million cubic meters (over 10 billion gallons) of lava has been erupted. This volume is approximately 16 times the volume of the Great Pyramid of Giza. USGS image by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

Though no active surface lava was observed within Halema‘uma‘u on May 25, Kīlauea summit continues to emit volcanic gases

Though no active surface lava was observed within Halema‘uma‘u on May 25, Kīlauea summit continues to emit volcanic gases. The most recent sulfur dioxide emission rate, measured on May 23, remains slightly elevated at 100 tonnes per day. This photo, taken from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u, shows an area near the north wall of Halema‘uma‘u crater that has been visibly degassing over the past few months. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)

An overview of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit, taken on May 25

An overview of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit, taken on May 25. Kīlauea’s summit collapse in 2018 deepened Halema‘uma‘u crater by over 500 meters (1640 feet). The eruption that began the evening of December 20, 2020, has filled approximately 229 m (751 ft) of the base of Halema‘uma‘u crater, which is more than the height of the Space Needle in Seattle, Washington. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.

(Public domain.)