Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - October 31, 2003

Release Date:

Halloween at Pu`u `O`o

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Onlookers sitting on flank of Pu`u `O`o are treated to spattering from west vent in filled West Gap Pit. Flow fed by spattering curves behind cone and heads off right side of image.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

photo of lava

Closer view of spattering from west vent in West Gap Pit.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

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Lava flow fed by spattering west vent in West Gap Pit, hidden in fume at top of image. Length of flow, about 850 m.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

 

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Closer view of front of lava flow in left image.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

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Area called Upper Mother's Day lava tube, with original Cookie Monster buried by largest hornito. Lava is welling from tube near site of growing hornitos (see images for October 24) and feeding flow traveling left beyond edge of image.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

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Looking northwest across Puka Nui toward West Gap Pit. Small black flow on floor of Puka Nui is fresh lava flow. Directly above it, in distance, is spatter from west vent in West Gap Pit. New flow is several tens of meters wide.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

photo of lava

Looking west-southwest across western part of floor of Pu`u `O`o crater, with fuming and, barely visible, spattering from West Gap Pit. Flow erupted earlier this morning is at far end of Pu`u `O`o crater. Fuming cone near left edge is Beehive vent.

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

photo of lava

Unusual perspective of crater floor of Pu`u `O`o, looking east from septum separating crater from West Gap Pit; septum is shown in left image. Visible vents on crater floor are Beehive (right), January (center), and East Pond (largely hidden by fume).

(Credit: , . Public domain.)

Map of flows from Pu`u `O`o: 10 October 2003

Map shows lava flows erupted during 1983-present activity of Pu`u `O`o and Kupaianaha. Red denotes Mother's Day flow, which began erupting on May 12, 2002 and continues to the present.

Through September and into early October,  lava was moving along the east and west sides of the Mother's Day flow. The east-side lava (known as the August 9 breakout) came from the August 9 rootless shield, itself fed by the main Mother's Day tube from Pu`u `O`o. The west side lava, known as the Kohola arm of the Mother's Day flow, branched off the tube system below the rootless shield.

In early October, the August 9 breakout stopped moving, the Kohola died back to a trickle, and the rootless shield gained prominence. By October 16, however, the shield had partly collapsed, leaving several drained perched ponds behind. Upstream from the shield, many hornitos and small flows formed over the Mother's Day tube.

(Public domain.)