Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - September 24, 2014

Release Date:

Leading edge of June 27th flow stalls, but activity persists near flow front

Leading edge of June 27th flow stalls, but activity persists near f...

The leading edge of the June 27th flow stalled over the weekend, but active breakouts persist near the flow front, a short distance behind this stalled front. Today, lava was slowly advancing on a different front, along the north margin of the flow. The burn scar from a brush fire triggered by the lava this weekend covers much of the lower portion of the photograph.

(Public domain.)

Another view of the flow front region, looking northeast. Pāhoa ca...

Another view of the flow front region, looking northeast. Pāhoa can be seen near the top of the photograph, and is about 3.3 km (2.1 miles) from the stalled flow front.

(Public domain.)

Several skylights provided views into the June 27th lava tube today...

Several skylights provided views into the June 27th lava tube today, and the fluid lava stream could be seen moving downslope.

(Public domain.)

The thermal image on the right provides a different view of the flo...

The thermal image on the right provides a different view of the flow front, and clearly shows the scattered breakouts in this area. Most of these active breakouts were at, or upslope from, the slowly advancing flow front on the north margin of the flow. The leading edge of the stalled flow front, not surprisingly, did not have any active breakouts.

(Public domain.)

A wide view from the summit, looking east. Halema‘uma‘u Crater occ...

A wide view from the summit, looking east. Halema‘uma‘u Crater occupies the foreground, with the lava lake in the Overlook crater. At the skyline, Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō can be seen. The June 27th lava flow is fed from a vent on Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, with lava traveling through a lava tube to the flow front. The position of the flow front is marked by a smoke plume as the lava at the front burns vegetation.

(Public domain.)

Preview image for video: shows an HVO geologist sampling lava on th...

Preview image for video: shows an HVO geologist sampling lava on the June 27th lava flow using a rock hammer. The lava is placed into a bucket of water to quench the sample. Lava samples like this are routinely collected for chemical analysis, which provides insight into the magmatic system feeding the eruption.

(Public domain.)

This comparison of a photograph with a corresponding thermal image ...

This comparison of a photograph with a corresponding thermal image shows a typical lobe of pāhoehoe on the June 27th lava flow. The highest surface temperatures in this image are just under 900 Celsius (1650 F), but if one measured the temperature of the lava beneath the thin crust it would be close to 1140 Celsius (2080 F).

(Public domain.)