Small magnitude earthquakes detected at Mount St. Helens.

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The largest earthquake was a Magnitude 0.7, an event that would not be felt even if you were standing on the surface above it.

On March 14, 2016, the seismic network at Mount St. Helens began detecting small magnitude earthquakes at a depth of 3–4 km beneath the crater. Twelve earthquakes have been formally located and the local seismic network detected at least 100 earthquakes too small to be recorded on enough seismometers to calculate a location. Many of the earthquakes have similar seismic signatures, suggesting they are occurring in the same area as the located earthquakes. According to the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, the largest earthquake over a four-day period was a Magnitude 0.7, an event that would not be felt even if you were standing on the surface above it.

These types of volcano-tectonic earthquakes beneath Mount St. Helens are likely associated with the recharge of the volcano. After the 2004-2008 eruption, subtle inflation of the ground surface and seismicity indicate that the magma reservoir beneath Mount St. Helens is slowly re-pressurizing, as it did after the conclusion of the 1980-1986 eruption. This is to be expected and it does not indicate that the volcano is likely to erupt anytime soon. Re-pressurization of a volcano's magma reservoir is commonly observed at volcanoes that erupted recently, and recharge can continue for many years without an eruption. For more information, see the Activity Updates for Volcanoes in CVO Area of Responsibility and Earthquake Monitoring at Mount St. Helens.