USGS 360-degree videos of king tides show how rising seas will transform California beaches in the future

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USGS oceanographer Juliette Finzi Hart shot 360-degree videos of king tides—the highest high tides of the year—throughout the Los Angeles region in 2016 and 2017.

Roughly a dozen times a year, king tides lap the shores high up on the beach; this will be the “normal” high tide in about 20 years, based on National Academy of Sciences sea-level rise projections. King tide videos provide a glimpse of the future, and they help USGS scientists fine-tune the Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS), which combines projected sea-level rise and storm intensities to forecast future coastal flooding. The CoSMoS team has been working with partners to develop immersive virtual reality and video products to help communities understand how coastal hazards and rising seas will alter California's coastline. Previous products include the 2016 Santa Monica Pier Owl project, in which USGS CoSMoS simulations allowed people to see how Santa Monica beaches could be transformed in the future.

360 degree video captured this photograph during a normal high tide at Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles.
USGS oceanographer Juliette Finzi Hart shot 360-degree videos throughout the Los Angeles region in 2016 and 2017. Above: normal high tide at Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles, on January 6, 2017.(Credit: Juliette Finzi Hart, USGS. Public domain.)
360 degree video captured this photograph during the king high tide at Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles.
USGS oceanographer Juliette Finzi Hart shot 360-degree videos throughout the Los Angeles region in 2016 and 2017. Above: "king" high tide at Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles, on February 10, 2017.(Credit: Juliette Finzi Hart, USGS. Public domain.)