Winter Ticks, Moose, and Climate Change

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A recent article in Jackson Hole News & Guide highlights National CASC supported research on how climate change could affect the impact of winter ticks on moose and other ungulates in Wyoming. 

Image: Moose (Alces alces)

Male moose standing in the grass at rehabilitation center. (Public domain.)

Read the original news story posted by the Jackson Hole News & Guide, here.

Shira moose populations in Jackson Hole, WY have dwindled in size from historic highs in the 1980’s.  Factors such as degraded habitat, changes in predation, and warmer temperatures have played a role in this reduction, but the impact of winter ticks on moose populations was previously unknown. A recent article in Jackson Hole News & Guide spotlights National CAS supported researcher Troy Koser’s work on winter tick populations in Wyoming. This work is intended to give wildlife managers insight into where ticks are most numerous now and might be in the future, informing moose managers decisions about moose habitat management.

This work is supported by the National CASC project, “Moose and Winter Ticks in Western Wyoming”.

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