Alaska Science Center

News

News Releases are timely, official communications produced by the Alaska Science Center that are targeted for use by the news media in reporting information on scientific findings or program activities.

If you have questions about upcoming events, research, or media inquiries regarding the USGS Alaska Science Center please contact Yvette Gillies or Paul Laustsen.

Filter Total Items: 94
Date published: December 15, 2014

New Scientific Study Supports that Capture-based Research is Safe for Polar Bears

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A polar bear capture and release-based research program had no adverse long-term effects on feeding behavior, body condition, and reproduction, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey.

Date published: November 17, 2014

Southern Beaufort Sea Polar Bear Population Declined in the 2000s

In a new polar bear study published today, scientists from the United States and Canada found that during the first decade of the 21st century, the number of polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea experienced a sharp decline of approximately 40 percent. 

Date published: September 8, 2014

Research Shows Historic Decline in Pacific Walrus Population

The Pacific walrus population roughly halved between 1981 and 1999, the last year for which demographic data are available. A recent study by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey quantifies this historic population decline.

Date published: July 24, 2014

Climate Change Could Alter Range of Caribou and May Impact Hunters' Access

Alaska — Due to climate change, some communities in rural Alaska and the Yukon Territory of Canada may face a future with fewer caribou according to new research published by the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks in the recent issue of PLoS ONE.

Date published: July 3, 2014

Hyperspectral Aerial Survey will Enhance Mapping Capabilities

Starting on July 5 (weather permitting), U.S. Geological Survey scientists will conduct a high-resolution airborne survey over the next 30 days to study the distribution of minerals exposed at the surface in various parts of Alaska.

Date published: June 6, 2014

Through the Eyes of a Polar Bear

The first "point of view" video from a polar bear on Arctic sea ice has just become available courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey. 

Date published: May 28, 2014

Map Store Closes, Moves Online

The U.S. Geological Survey is reducing its footprint on the Alaska Pacific University campus by closing the Map Store @ USGS to lower rent costs. The store will remain open through Oct. 31, 2014.

Date published: April 30, 2014

Can a Creeping Segment of the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone Generate a Great Earthquake?

The coastal geology of Simeonof Island, the southeastern-most island in the Shumagin archipelago of the Aleutian Islands, suggests the region has not experienced a great megathrust earthquake in at least the past 3,400 years.

Date published: April 8, 2014

Sea Otters Can Get the Flu, Too

Northern sea otters living off the coast of Washington state were infected with the same H1N1 flu virus that caused the world-wide pandemic in 2009, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study. 

Date published: March 27, 2014

Prior Great Earthquakes Unveiled at the Western Edge of the 1964 Alaska Rupture

Ever since the great magnitude 9.2 earthquake shook Alaska 50 years ago today, scientists have suspected that the quake's rupture halted at the southwestern tip of Kodiak Island due to a natural barrier.

Date published: March 20, 2014

The Science Behind the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake and Tsunami

Why does the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake Matter 50 Years Later? Scientific experts will talk about a half-century of scientific and monitoring advances triggered by the 1964 events.

Date published: March 11, 2014

"Ultra Marathon Champion" Bird May Plan Flights Based on Weather Across Pacific

A recent U.S. Geological Survey-led study of the bar-tailed godwit, a shorebird known famously as the ultimate marathon champion of bird flight, suggests that these birds can sense broad weather patterns and optimally time their long, nonstop, transoceanic migrations to destinations thousands of miles away.