California Water Science Center

Aquatic Ecosystems

Aquatic ecosystems information and data is neccessary for many California water management decisions including preservation of California's natural resources. The California Water Science Center conducts interdisciplinary research from aquatic species behavioral, population and community ecology, to the effects hydrologic extremes and climage change on ecosystems.  

Filter Total Items: 77
Date published: December 4, 2018
Status: Completed

Scoping Study of Los Angeles River-Arroyo Seco Confluence Park

The Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority (MRCA) is considering plans for developing a new park at the confluence of the Los Angeles River and the Arroyo Seco. These plans include removing channel lining and creating a temporary lake using an inflatable rubber dam. Before implementing the plan, a wide array of scientific and engineering issues must be addressed. The U.S. Geological...

Contacts: Michael T Land
Date published: December 3, 2018
Status: Active

A Non-Point Source Of Contaminants To The Estuarine Food Web: Mobilized Particles From The Intertidal Zone

The San Francisco Bay and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Bay-Delta) region is a highly urbanized and contaminated estuary with a valuable commercial and recreational fishery (Nichlos et al., 1986; SFEI, 2004). Many fish and birds in the San Francisco Estuary exhibit high levels of contaminants (metals and organic pollutants), which have been shown to affect their behavior and reproductive...

Contacts: Jacob A Fleck
Date published: November 28, 2018
Status: Active

Mercury

Mercury is a rare, dense metal, slightly more common than gold in the earth's crust. Mercury occurs in several different forms, the most important of which is methylmercury. Methylmercury is the form most readily incorporated into biological tissues and most toxic to humans. Methylmercury accumulates and biomagnifies in the food chain, reaching highest concentrations in predatory fish such as...

Date published: November 28, 2018
Status: Completed

Assessing the role of winter flooding on baseline greenhouse gas fluxes from corn fields in the Sacramento – San Joaquin Bay Delta

Understanding the magnitude and variability of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Sacramento – San Joaquin Bay Delta is critical for current and future land management. For example, strategies that maximize carbon sequestration in soils and plants while minimizing unintended consequences such as GHG emissions are likely to produce both economic and environmental benefits for the...

Contacts: Brian Pellerin
Date published: November 27, 2018
Status: Active

Pesticide Occurrence in California – Yolo Bypass Pesticide Analyses

The project is part of an overarching Interagency Ecological Program (IEP)/Department of Water Resources (DWR) study that is focused on understanding the processes by which the Yolo Bypass may provide a fall food web supply for the Cache Slough Complex and downstream regions of the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta.  Several studies conducted since 2011 have shown that phytoplankton blooms can be...

Contacts: James Orlando
Date published: November 20, 2018
Status: Completed

Spatially Explicit Mapping of Hydrologic Residence Time Paired with Water Quality Measurements to Determine the Effects of the Emergency Drought Barrier

The purpose of this study is to assess the distribution of water residence times across the central Delta using rapid water isotope measurements (δ2H, δ18O) made with a boat-based flow-through instrument.

Contacts: Bryan Downing
Date published: November 19, 2018
Status: Completed

Enterococcus Surface Protein as an Indicator of Human Fecal Pollution in the Lower Russian River Basin

Preliminary evaluation of water-quality data collected in the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California during an on-going program by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA), indicated that there is considerable variability in bacterial concentrations from reach to reach and from year to year. Furthermore, tributaries that maintained...

Contacts: Robert Anders
Date published: November 16, 2018
Status: Completed

Water-Quality Inventory Pesticides in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area

In 1998, all urban creeks in the San Francisco Bay Area were added to the Clean Water Act Section 303d list due to known or suspected diazinon impairment. Diazinon is an organophosphorus insecticide used on lawns, and fruit and vegetables. This pesticide has since been "phased out" and has not been available for purchase since late 2004. Diazinon use is declining and is being replaced by other...

Date published: November 15, 2018
Status: Active

Variability of Salinity and Temperature In San Francisco Bay

The USGS has been collecting specific conductance (salinity) and water temperature data in San Francisco Bay (SF Bay) since 1990. Data are typically collected at 5-10 fixed locations throughout the bay, every fifteen minutes, every minute of the day.

Date published: November 15, 2018
Status: Completed

High-Speed Mapping of Nutrient Distributions and Water Quality Survey - Lower South San Francisco Bay

This project aims to characterize spatial heterogeneity for key water quality parameters, and pilot the use of underway-flowthrough mapping of biogeochemical properties as a cost-effective approach to monitoring. 

Date published: November 15, 2018
Status: Completed

Assessment of Baseline Conditions in Liberty Cut

Monitoring habitat quality in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) and Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta has been limited to mostly monthly discrete measurements of biologically relevant parameters (e.g. phytoplankton, dissolved organic matter (DOM), nutrients) that cannot fully characterize the physical and biogeochemical variability.

Contacts: Bryan Downing
Date published: November 15, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluating coagulation techniques to reduce the transport of Hg from mine-affected and active geothermal Hg-source watersheds

Our objective is to determine the effectiveness of coagulation and adsorption techniques in removing mercury from contaminated surface waters of the Cache Creek watershed.

Contacts: Jacob A Fleck