River-Corridor Habitat Dynamics

Science Center Objects

River-Corridor Habitat Dynamics research seeks to improve the scientific basis for ecological restoration of large rivers.  Emphasis is placed on understanding how hydrologic and geomorphic characteristics combine to create dynamic habitats for native and exotic fauna and flora.  

Using interdisciplinary studies with scientists from throughout the USGS, Federal and State agencies, academia, and non-governmental organizations, CERC scientists conduct research that includes classification of habitats in large rivers of the Mid-Continent (Missouri, Platte, Loup rivers), land-capability indices applied to wetland development and cottonwood recruitment in the Missouri River, and habitat dynamics related to pallid sturgeon and Asian carp reproduction in the Missouri River. 

 

Inundated floodplains may provide multiple ecosystems services, includ

Inundated floodplains may provide multiple ecosystems services, including nutrient processing, flood-risk mitigation, and access of fish to food and spawning sites.

(Public domain.)

 

 

Floodplain Processes and Habitats 

Principal Investigators Robert Jacobson, Ph.D. and Ed Bulliner

This project addresses processes that determine structure and functional elements of large-river floodplains, including understanding to apply to management and restoration of floodplains for fish, wildlife, and ecosystem services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed maps of the bottom of the Missouri River reveal the complexity of habitats used by sturgeon.

Detailed maps of the bottom of the Missouri River reveal the complexity of habitats used by sturgeon.

(Public domain.)

 

 

Pallid Sturgeon Habitat Dynamics 

Principal Investigators Robert Jacobson, Ph.D.Susannah O Erwin, Ph.D., and Caroline Elliott

This project applies advanced measurement and modeling approaches to quantifying habitats in large rivers. Our research has been applied to improving the understanding of the reproductive ecology of the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) in the Missouri River.

 

 

 

 

 

Hydrologic technician Brian Anderson prepares to launch the Z-boat on the Current River

The Z-boat is a remote controlled, battery operated vessel which utilizes an accoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to map shallow water habitats. 

(Public domain.)

 

 

 

Ozarks Stream Dynamics and Native Mussel Habitats 

Principal Investigator Susannah O Erwin, Ph.D.

The National Park Service is implementing plans for the survey and management of the mussel fauna at the Ozark National Scenic Riverways and Buffalo National River in Missouri. CERC scientists are conducting research to understand how geomorphic patterns effect the distribution of mussels in Missouri streams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

R/V Lucien M. Brush surveys the Missouri River

R/V Lucien M. Brush surveys the Missouri River

(Public domain.)

 

 

Geomorphic Trends and Dynamics, Missouri National Recreational River 

Principal Investigators Caroline ElliottRobert Jacobson, Ph.D., and Ed Bulliner

The two mainstem Missouri River segments of the Missouri National Recreational River (MNRR) represent some of the least altered channel form and most complex physical habitat on the Missouri River. The 39-mile segment is located in an inter-reservoir reach between Fort Randall Dam and Lewis and Clark Lake and the 59-mile segment is located below Gavins Point Dam, the downstream-most water control impoundment in the Missouri River system.

 

 

 

 

Synthesis documents offer an opportunity to characterize project progress and status alongside regular publications.

Synthesis documents offer an opportunity to characterize project progress and status alongside regular publications. These five documents summarized the progress of the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project and the evolution of scientific decisionmaking. 

(Public domain.)

 

 

 

Synthesis of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Drivers of Riverine Habitat Dynamics 

Principal Investigator Robert Jacobson, Ph.D.

Habitats of many rivers of the US are perceived to be degraded as a result of human-induced stresses.  CERC scientist are focusing on physical habitat as measured by depth, velocity, and substrate, in order to establish relevance of physical habitat to biota.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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