Colorado Water Science Center

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Date published: May 13, 2019

2019 USGS Unmanned Aircraft Systems Aquatic Airshow

A USGS Unmanned Aircraft Systems Aquatic Airshow field testing and demonstration event occurred 4/30/2019 - 5/2/2019 on the Saco River near Biddeford, and the Androscoggin River near Lewiston in Maine, USA.

Date published: September 14, 2018

Big Thompson Floods of 1976 and 2013 - A Visual Comparison

The Big Thompson Floods of 1976 and 2013 shown visually. The inundation images reflect the location and peak streamflows at certain points between Estes Park and Loveland, Colorado.

Date published: June 26, 2018

Media Advisory: Witness Groundbreaking River Measurements Collected from the Sky

This Thursday, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and NASA will test new technologies near Parkdale, Colorado, located west of Cañon City, to better understand how unmanned aerial systems (UAS), or drones, may be used to measure water depth, water levels and velocity from the sky. 

Date published: December 1, 2017

Hundreds of Biological Data Available for Fountain Creek Basin, Colorado 

The U.S. Geological Survey just added more than 800 fish and macroinvertebrate data samples from Fountain Creek, Colorado, to the USGS BioData Retrieval system.

Date published: January 12, 2017

New Tool Shows Historic and Simulated Future Water Conditions in the U.S.

Water users around the country can now view the past and simulated future of hydrologic processes. 

Date published: July 25, 2016

Big Thompson Canyon Floods of 1976 and 2013: A Tale of Two Deadly and Destructive Weather Events

 

Forty years ago on July 31, as Coloradoans and tourists celebrated the state’s centennial, between 12 and 14 inches of rain fell over a four-hour period in the mountains below the resort town of Estes Park, killing 143 people. The 1976 Big Thompson flood stands as the worst natural disaster in Colorado’s recorded history.

Date published: April 15, 2015

April Showers may Bring May Flowers, but Winter Snow is Water in the Bank

The type of precipitation falling from the sky matters, especially for delicate mountain ecosystems.